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Google have teased a big Stadia event planned next week where we could see new game announcements, along with some special early demos to try out. Seems they're starting to ramp-up everything now, following on from finally putting out a pretty good explainer advert on what Stadia actually is.

Starting October 20 and going on for three days, they're doing an event that will have "exciting game announcements and some Stadia-only hands-on surprises". There's not much details right now but they also said there will be three games to try, with "exclusive" demos and reveals of more games coming to the Stadia streaming service.

At least this time around, Google are being a bit smarter. Unlike their 'Free Play Days', it seems according to a Stadia staffer on Twitter that you will not need Stadia Pro to access the demos.

The event starts on October 20 at 9 AM PT / 4PM UTC, which will be up on the Stadia YouTube. We'll be following along each day, to let you know what's announced. What are you expecting?


In other news, the Stadia team recently held a Q&A session with Founders in a special section on their community site. In response to questions about people pointing out the famous Google Graveyard, something people love to bring up constantly, Chris from Google replied to say:

You can rest assured that Google is in it for the long haul. We saw something special in cloud gaming, and we think we have the tools and knowledge to push this technology to the next level. It's okay to be unsure; the future is uncertain. But we care deeply about this space, because we are gamers too, and we want Stadia to succeed. 

While the other Stadia staff member involved in the Q&A, Grace, said:

Ah, yes I hope you all know that I see those comments that say "Stadia is headed for the Google Graveyard". My response to this is... please give the Stadia team time. It's been less than a year since we've launched, and we have a lot in store for you all.

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Liam Dawe 14 Oct
Quoting: ShmerlFirst of all, they profit off Linux in it. It's proper to give Linux gaming something back, and I don't find it not fitting to criticize them for not doing more.
Nothing to do with proper or not, you don't have to give back to open source if you use it. That's not what it's all about. It's about freedom, and it's borderline zealotry to claim any company using FOSS in their stack has to "give back" or has to keep doing more and fit into some special philosophy just because they use it.

That said, Google do give back plenty to the FOSS world anyway. Some of what's used for Stadia is open source here, and as pointed out in a previous article they also have:

  • Open Match (Apache license) - "an open source game matchmaking framework that simplifies building a scalable and extensible Matchmaker". This is something Google co-founded with Unity.
  • Agones (Apache license) - "a library for hosting, running and scaling dedicated game servers on Kubernetes". This was co-founded with Ubisoft.

And you might want to look at this big website dedicated to Google and open source. There's a lot more that people probably aren't even aware of.


Last edited by Liam Dawe on 14 October 2020 at 3:52 pm UTC
Shmerl 14 Oct
Quoting: Liam DaweNothing to do with proper or not, you don't have to give back to open source if you use it.

Same as you don't have to avoid criticizing them for not doing it ;) Mutual collaborative relationship is better than someone profiting on FOSS and not improving it in that area.

Tackling the actual publisher deadlock is something I'd consider a contribution fitting for Google.


Last edited by Shmerl on 14 October 2020 at 3:54 pm UTC
mirv 14 Oct
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Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: Liam DaweThey want people to come to them. It's business, plain and simple.

To be blunt, they don't need to "give back" anything. They're providing a service.

First of all, they profit off Linux in it. It's proper to give Linux gaming something back, and I don't find it not fitting to criticize them for not doing more.

Collaboration can be beneficial to all parties, as above and be good for business. So it's not really "about us", it's more about making it "it's not about everyone else", even if it's at the cost of their own benefit. That's an attitude in the gaming industry especially and it's bad for progress of technology.

But they do give something back. The HLSL -> SPIR-V compiler was pushed from Google, as my favourite example. They've helped in development and debug tools too.
Shmerl 14 Oct
Quoting: mirvBut they do give something back. The HLSL -> SPIR-V compiler was pushed from Google, as my favourite example. They've helped in development and debug tools too.

Something yes, but I feel like big problems require bigger players to solve them. Publisher deadlock is a massive problem. Valve tried to move the needle and it didn't move far. Heavyweights like Google can tip the balance in the right direction, especially if it's in their interest to have more publishers releasing for Linux in general - it clearly can benefit Stadia.


Last edited by Shmerl on 14 October 2020 at 4:08 pm UTC
mirv 14 Oct
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Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: mirvBut they do give something back. The HLSL -> SPIR-V compiler was pushed from Google, as my favourite example. They've helped in development and debug tools too.

Something yes, but I feel like big problems require bigger players to solve them. Publisher deadlock is a massive problem. Valve tried to move the needle and it didn't move far. Heavyweights like Google can tip the balance in the right direction, especially if it's in their interest to have more publishers releasing for Linux in general - it clearly can benefit Stadia.

Does it, though? I mean, does releasing for GNU/Linux in general benefit Stadia? I would have thought developer experience with GNU/Linux would be beneficial, not necessarily releasing games on the platform. While releasing for GNU/Linux implies developer experience, Google can really only push that if there's GNU/Linux machines to be pushed onto, which means taking on the burden of trying to put that into people's homes over Windows. Not even Google is heavyweight enough to do that - which is exactly why their development tooling for Stadia works remotely through Visual Studio.

What would be better from Google is allowing more games to be available through Stadia and have developers interested in wanting to get onto the platform. Smaller developers, not just the big ones. That would naturally interest more people in figuring out how to develop for Stadia, and by extension GNU/Linux. Oh, and Google could let SDL2 support for Stadia be made more widely available. I think I read somewhere that someone doing work for that couldn't release it to the general public, but I might be mistaken.


Last edited by mirv on 14 October 2020 at 4:29 pm UTC
Shmerl 14 Oct
Quoting: mirvDoes it, though? I mean, does releasing for GNU/Linux in general benefit Stadia?

I think it does, almost directly. Game released for Linux is trivial to release for Stadia (assuming all modern APIs usage like Vulkan which should be the case for modern games either way). Bethesda developers pointed it out in their Stadia talks explicitly. So it's not just expertise, simply the number of Linux games potentially increases Stadia's pool of games. I see it very beneficial for Google to make as many publishers releasing routinely for Linux as possible.

Quoting: mirvOh, and Google could let SDL2 support for Stadia be made more widely available. I think I read somewhere that someone doing work for that couldn't release it to the general public, but I might be mistaken.

I suspected they are using some custom SDL, but if they aren't upstreaming things - that's a major shame and sounds already like a stance that's actually harmful.


Last edited by Shmerl on 14 October 2020 at 5:37 pm UTC
mirv 14 Oct
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Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: mirvDoes it, though? I mean, does releasing for GNU/Linux in general benefit Stadia?

I think it does, almost directly. Game released for Linux is trivial to release for Stadia. Bethesda developers pointed it out in their Stadia talks explicitly. So it's not just expertise, simply the number of Linux games potentially increases Stadia's pool of games.

I would almost agree, however Stadia needs a certain quality level of the games for both stability and performance. The Bethesda people (or Doom developers) already had both of that in spades, and help from AMD directly in getting there.

I think Google would be better off pushing behind the scenes for better support that just so helps GNU/Linux desktop rather than push the games themselves. So help with Unity, for example. And Google could _definitely_ help out in getting a few companies together to keep older games running, like what Valve is doing with Collabora. I suspect actually that Google is doing all this, we're just not really hearing about it.
Shmerl 14 Oct
Quoting: mirvI would almost agree, however Stadia needs a certain quality level of the games for both stability and performance. The Bethesda people (or Doom developers) already had both of that in spades, and help from AMD directly in getting there.

It's still a lot easier for Google to say: "Hey, come release your Linux game for Stadia, we'll help you here if you to need improve quality" than to say "Hey, come release your Windows game for Stadia... oops you need to make sure it works on Linux first and has good quality...".

So growing number of Linux games is beneficial for Stadia overall.

Quoting: mirvAnd Google could _definitely_ help out in getting a few companies together to keep older games running, like what Valve is doing with Collabora. I suspect actually that Google is doing all this, we're just not really hearing about it.

Why would they hide that?


Last edited by Shmerl on 14 October 2020 at 5:53 pm UTC
mirv 14 Oct
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Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: mirvI would almost agree, however Stadia needs a certain quality level of the games for both stability and performance. The Bethesda people (or Doom developers) already had both of that in spades, and help from AMD directly in getting there.

It's still a lot easier for Google to say: "Hey, come release your Linux game for Stadia, we'll help you here if you to need improve quality" than to say "hey, come release your Windows game for Stadia... oops you need to make sure it works on Linux and has good quality...".

So growing number of Linux games is beneficial for Stadia overall.

Quoting: mirvAnd Google could _definitely_ help out in getting a few companies together to keep older games running, like what Valve is doing with Collabora. I suspect actually that Google is doing all this, we're just not really hearing about it.

Why would they hide that?

No one particular reason, but it's quite common for companies to do quite a lot of such work that isn't well known. It's not really a product so never gets to marketing, or there are NDAs in place because of work on proprietary code (easier to just blanket not mention it), is part of a wider group effort (e.g Khronos), lost in the noise (Kernel), is known by other names (Gerrit code review was originally a Google thing) and so on.
elmapul 14 Oct
Quoting: 3zekiel
Quoting: elmapulWhat are you expecting?

kingdom hearts, that will give pc gamers an reason to try, since this game never gets relased for pc for some reason.
and... any other big title that never get ported to pc (i cant think of any now)

street fighter 5 (i doubt it will happen), they had console exclusivity deal with sony, but that didnt stoped it from appearing on pc, so who knows about streaming?

any project diva
.hack//g.u. last recode
neptunia series, touhou series, blazz blue, guilty gear
blood stained
Yooka-Laylee The Impossible Lair
tekken / dead or alive
persona series
final fantasy series
nier series
yakuza series

and some ecchi games without censorship (just because its very unlikely)

and last but not least, cyber punk 2077 exclusive demo just to make the haters mad.

Genshin Impact would be a good addition too: https://community.stadia.com/t5/Stadia-General/Genshin-Impact/m-p/34056 with people being worried about invasive anti cheat. I do play it on my ps4 with chiaki to stream it on my pc, and it is definitely nice.

And I would kill to get project diva and kingdom hearts on PC, including through Stadia.
the issue with anti cheat is:
either the game have crossplay with other platforms and as result, hackers can still hack due to the other platforms...

or the game dont have crossplay and as result: you cant play with/against most of the players and the game dies on stadia, its a dead end.

another thing to consider is that google already makes money with genshin on playstore, and we can play it on android.
i think his priority should be the games that they dont have yet, and that is good for us too.
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