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Google have teased a big Stadia event planned next week where we could see new game announcements, along with some special early demos to try out. Seems they're starting to ramp-up everything now, following on from finally putting out a pretty good explainer advert on what Stadia actually is.

Starting October 20 and going on for three days, they're doing an event that will have "exciting game announcements and some Stadia-only hands-on surprises". There's not much details right now but they also said there will be three games to try, with "exclusive" demos and reveals of more games coming to the Stadia streaming service.

At least this time around, Google are being a bit smarter. Unlike their 'Free Play Days', it seems according to a Stadia staffer on Twitter that you will not need Stadia Pro to access the demos.

The event starts on October 20 at 9 AM PT / 4PM UTC, which will be up on the Stadia YouTube. We'll be following along each day, to let you know what's announced. What are you expecting?


In other news, the Stadia team recently held a Q&A session with Founders in a special section on their community site. In response to questions about people pointing out the famous Google Graveyard, something people love to bring up constantly, Chris from Google replied to say:

You can rest assured that Google is in it for the long haul. We saw something special in cloud gaming, and we think we have the tools and knowledge to push this technology to the next level. It's okay to be unsure; the future is uncertain. But we care deeply about this space, because we are gamers too, and we want Stadia to succeed. 

While the other Stadia staff member involved in the Q&A, Grace, said:

Ah, yes I hope you all know that I see those comments that say "Stadia is headed for the Google Graveyard". My response to this is... please give the Stadia team time. It's been less than a year since we've launched, and we have a lot in store for you all.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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elmapul 15 Oct
Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: mirvDoes it, though? I mean, does releasing for GNU/Linux in general benefit Stadia?

I think it does, almost directly. Game released for Linux is trivial to release for Stadia (assuming all modern APIs usage like Vulkan which should be the case for modern games either way). Bethesda developers pointed it out in their Stadia talks explicitly. So it's not just expertise, simply the number of Linux games potentially increases Stadia's pool of games. I see it very beneficial for Google to make as many publishers releasing routinely for Linux as possible.

Quoting: mirvOh, and Google could let SDL2 support for Stadia be made more widely available. I think I read somewhere that someone doing work for that couldn't release it to the general public, but I might be mistaken.

I suspected they are using some custom SDL, but if they aren't upstreaming things - that's a major shame and sounds already like a stance that's actually harmful.

i think youre over estimating the benefits and underestimating the costs.


the issue with supporting linux in general is supporting all distros in all hardware combinations.
just just test against nvidia 1060, but nvidia 1060 on an intel cpu, nvidia 1060 on an amd cpu, or an specific model of intel cpu.
the game may work fine in one hardware combination but not in other and you have to figure out why, imagine testing an game with 200 hours of gameplay in countless distros in countless hardware configurations?
on stadia, you have on distro and hardware to test against and that is it, they will upgrade the hardware in the future, but you wont have to test again in thousands of video cards and cpus, only the 1 new configuration.

google could let those games get relased for linux in general, but then steam and others who sell games for linux will be able to sell those games for this public too.
sure, we arent many but at the current state i wont be surprised to discovery that most of the stadia users are also linux users, considering that stadia is one of our only options when it comes to games and they dont have as many players as we have users.
so as of right now, google is probably wasting money to port games to make money, not now but in the future, the few money that google is earning is helping to pay the costs but not much, and he gonna make it even worse by allowing others to compete with him?

one good thing that google is doing is helping the linux marketshare to grow (alongside the chromeOS marketshare wich benefits google), and this increase in marketshare may help us to get the games elsewhere anyway, especially considering that part of the cost of porting to linux was already paid, those companies are more likely to relase elsewhere once the market grown.

in the end of the day, no one is paid to be impartial ( well techinically khronos and w3c are, but that is beyond the point) if you keep spending money to benefit everyone but others dont do the same, you will end up without money while others profit from it without contributing back.
Shmerl 15 Oct
Quoting: elmapulin the end of the day, no one is paid to be impartial ( well techinically khronos and w3c are, but that is beyond the point) if you keep spending money to benefit everyone but others dont do the same, you will end up without money while others profit from it without contributing back.

Increasing the number of Linux games directly benefits Google. What's the issue that it also benefits other stores? Stadia is still in positive, because it's not the same as Steam or other stores. Titles exclusivity is a faulty method to differentiate. Features good for the users - that's something stores should be competing on.

Same goes for anyone else. If Steam or GOG help something come out for Linux, Stadia can as well benefit from it by releasing it too. So I don't see any issue in all of them collaborating on breaking this publisher deadlock situation. That's what they should have been doing all along.


Last edited by Shmerl on 15 October 2020 at 2:47 am UTC
elmapul 15 Oct
Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: elmapulin the end of the day, no one is paid to be impartial ( well techinically khronos and w3c are, but that is beyond the point) if you keep spending money to benefit everyone but others dont do the same, you will end up without money while others profit from it without contributing back.

Increasing the number of Linux games directly benefits Google. What's the issue that it also benefits other stores? Stadia is still in positive, because it's not the same as Steam or other stores. Titles exclusivity is a faulty method to differentiate. Features good for the users - that's something stores should be competing on.

Same goes for anyone else. If Steam or GOG help something come out for Linux, Stadia can as well benefit from it by releasing it too. So I don't see any issue in all of them collaborating on breaking this publisher deadlock situation. That's what they should have been doing all along.

"Titles exclusivity is a faulty method to differentiate. "
except that it works, history has proven again and again that this strategy fucking works, its just gamers ideology that refuse to adimit that there are more people willing to buy an playstation to play that exclusive game than people willing to boycot the console and game because they used this strategy of exclusives.
and even if consumers want to boycot this strategy, where they gonna play? nintendo make exclusives, sony make exclusives, microsoft make exclusive games and direct x wich is an exclusive api...

exclusives guarantee an minimum playerbase wich guarantee an minimum of developers interested in developing for the platform wich guarantee the playerbase will grow.

but even that is not enough nor the point:
google is spending money to convince companies to support their platform, he need to cash back this money somehow.
if we purchase those games on steam instead, then he will be spending money without making it back from us, sure there are a lot of people out there who might buy beside us, but the more the better for then.

the benefit they get from helping us is lesser than from us purchasing from then.

plus the marketshare wont move anytime soon, the sales on the other hand will happen soon.


Last edited by elmapul on 15 October 2020 at 9:15 am UTC
Shmerl 15 Oct
And it's still disgusting as it always was. Exclusivity is an anti-competitive practice.
bacatta 15 Oct
Is there a way to test stadia for free ? without pro nor buying anything ?
Is the demos will be the solution next week ?
dubigrasu 15 Oct
Quoting: bacattaIs there a way to test stadia for free ? without pro nor buying anything ?
Is the demos will be the solution next week ?
AFAIK you can try it for free (for a month).
elmapul 21 Oct
Quoting: ShmerlAnd it's still disgusting as it always was. Exclusivity is an anti-competitive practice.

as much as i hate the concept of exclusives, i have lived enough to see the facts.
there is no such a thing as an world without exclusives, either we have something like we have on consoles were nintendo make some exclusives, sony make some exclusives, microsoft make some exclusives and everything else is multiplat, or what we have on pc, where almost everything is windows exclusive due to the sheer marketshare of it, and a few things go multiplat but the other platforms dont have a chance to grow their marketshare.

even if most developers were against exclusives, didnt acept sign any exclusivity deal and were willing to port their softwares/games to other platforms, that would be an dead end because:

1)linux dont have enough marketshare to be sustainable (the only reason we have a few ports is due to the lack of competition on our platform, we will never reach an point where most of the things are multi plat with our marketshare)

2)we're not just talking about linux here, if developers were willing to support all platforms, you could bet that we would have tons of platforms coming out of nowhere without any chance of competing but trying anyway because they knew the support would be there, i'm not talking just about operating systems, but game consoles like 3Do, turbografx, amico, etc. (the first 2 actually had an chance to compete but failed)

tons of platforms demanding support without providing enough value to developers. (in terms of marketshare or monetary reward for the ones who do support)

the time you spend rewriting the application for different platforms is the time you didnt spend improving the application for the platforms you already support, making your product less competitive against others.
sure, you could try some multiplat libraries, but the library writter would have to support all those platforms anyway.
sure, you can use some multiplat apis like openGL, but you still have to test it.

so, as much as i hate it, exclusives are here to stay.
mabye temporary exclusives could solve the issue.
Shmerl 21 Oct
Quoting: elmapulthere is no such a thing as an world without exclusives

That's a strange argument. I don't see a reason to accept crooked practices or to say "that's how it should be". No, thanks. We don't need it.


Last edited by Shmerl on 21 October 2020 at 2:01 am UTC
mirv 21 Oct
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Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: elmapulthere is no such a thing as an world without exclusives

That's a strange argument. I don't see a reason to accept crooked practices or to say "that's how it should be". No, thanks. We don't need it.

How nice of you to take one tiny thing being said and turn it completely out of context without offering an alternative at all.

Exclusives are here to stay. That's simply a matter of realism, nothing to do with the ethics behind it. That anti-consumer and anti-competitive exclusives exist is also something that currently exists and is entirely unethical, and some of it probably borderline illegal if the appropriate body ever looked closely enough at it.

Once you understand the difference between practicalities and intent, then discussions can actually progress. Listen to talks by Stallman: he will say what is wrong with something, why, and offer alternatives, but never just says "it's bad we don't want it".
Shmerl 21 Oct
That's just demagoguery. Crooked practices might be around whenever. That's never a reason to accept them.
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