Join us on our own very special Reddit: /r/Linuxers

Valve are committed to Linux and Linux gaming with Steam, that much is currently clear. They're working with so many contractors on various things, and it seems not everything is as people think.

Recently, Collabora, one of the companies they're contracting with went over a bunch of details like their upcoming Linux Kernel work coming to Linux 5.11 and then a quick overview of everything. Many people thought that a lot of the ongoing work, like the Kernel work was to help things like anti-cheat with Steam Play Proton and it was mentioned by Collabora however it seems that's not exactly the case. Valve developer Pierre-Loup Griffais commented on Reddit to clear up on some speculation, mentioning that Collabora did some speculating of their own. 

Griffais mentioned the Kernel work is "nothing to do with anti-cheat" and is instead for anti-tamper and DRM to function properly while also mentioning proper anti-cheat support "is still a long ways out and will need vendor support". That alone is going to be a sore spot for a long time for multiplayer titles run through the Proton compatibility layer, which is why we have an FAQ entry for Easy Anti-Cheat and BattlEye (the most popular) on our dedicated Proton site.

Other points mentioned are that the Steam Linux Runtime Container has nothing to do with security, OpenXR for SteamVR was done by Valve directly (Collabora's own VR work like Monado is unrelated), and the "image-based updater work" is actually towards improving live USB media to update them without losing user data.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Editorial, Misc, Valve
53 Likes, Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG, Humble Store and Paradox Interactive. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
38 comments
Page: «4/4
  Go to:

Quoting: mphuZ
Quoting: Purple Library Guythey themselves don't exactly know why they're working on upgrading Linux and Linux gaming
Absurdity. We are now talking about a huge Corporation, not about young students.
But Valve is weird. It's not really a corporation--not publicly traded, and so not worried about share prices, shareholder value, quarterly this-and-that etc.
There are shareholders, but they are basically Gabe and some other Valve developers, so how Valve is run is less about typical suit stuff and more comes down to the internal culture of that small group of people who are more technologically than business oriented. It's an odd cross between an oligarchy (probably near autocracy when the chips are down) and a workers' co-op.
In addition, their core business as far as I can tell is insanely profitable, and so far their competitors are only nibbling around the edges. They have the breathing room to pull a more Bell Labs kind of approach to a few things--dabble in some relatively "blue sky" R&D. So no, in the case of Valve I don't think my suggestion is absurd. If it were Epic or someone like that I would not suggest such an idea.
Salvatos 16 Nov
Quoting: HoriI'm not saying this is why they're doing this, as I don't think that's true, but you gotta admit there's a certain benefit in being loved by the community. Valve is basically our "knight in shining armour".
Indeed, I am reminded of the way many people said they would buy games at full price from Feral just to thank them for doing what they do, even when they already owned that title or weren’t interested in actually playing it. Similarly, I would never buy a Windows game from Epic to play it via Wine, but with Valve I’m willing to make a few exceptions knowing that some of that money will in fact go towards supporting the Linux ecosystem.
Quoting: Salvatos
Quoting: HoriI'm not saying this is why they're doing this, as I don't think that's true, but you gotta admit there's a certain benefit in being loved by the community. Valve is basically our "knight in shining armour".
Indeed, I am reminded of the way many people said they would buy games at full price from Feral just to thank them for doing what they do, even when they already owned that title or weren’t interested in actually playing it. Similarly, I would never buy a Windows game from Epic to play it via Wine, but with Valve I’m willing to make a few exceptions knowing that some of that money will in fact go towards supporting the Linux ecosystem.
There's something to it. Consider that Epic is doing those "megagrants", as far as I can tell mainly for the PR value.
Micromegas 16 Nov
So many great and thoughtful comments here. Just a "thank you!" to all who shared their thoughts! And this in 2020...
Hori 16 Nov
Quoting: Salvatos
Quoting: HoriI'm not saying this is why they're doing this, as I don't think that's true, but you gotta admit there's a certain benefit in being loved by the community. Valve is basically our "knight in shining armour".
Indeed, I am reminded of the way many people said they would buy games at full price from Feral just to thank them for doing what they do, even when they already owned that title or weren’t interested in actually playing it. Similarly, I would never buy a Windows game from Epic to play it via Wine, but with Valve I’m willing to make a few exceptions knowing that some of that money will in fact go towards supporting the Linux ecosystem.
Having to use WINE for others is also a very good point.
Even for people who don't really care if where their money goes, they still probably prefer Steam, since it's seamless playing Windows games there. You enable a checkbox once in Steam and that's it. You don't have to batter your head with installing and especially maintaining WINE. Lutris might make it much easier (AFAIK it also has support for Epic games) but it's still much more involvement than the "normal" process requires.
IMO Proton was the best move so far from Valve when it comes to Linux gaming and there's many reasons for it.
Linuxwarper 16 Nov
Quoting: GuerrillaFor me, Linux gaming is already here because I generally don't play online multiplayer games. I have literally one friend that plays games, so I rarely have anyone tugging at me to play a game online.

I can understand if you're into multiplayer games that the situation is disappointing, to say the least. But consider how far we've come; for example, I bought Yakuza: Like a Dragon last week and other than some minor annoyances/workarounds, the game basically works out of the box on day one. It's stunning to me to see a AAA game work day one, but here we are.

Hopefully there will be some solution to the anticheat problem that truly makes Linux a viable platform for gamers of all stripes.
It's wonderful to me as well. But it's been so long time since mentions of talks between Valve and EAC, and it's still far off. But we must also look at it from another point of view.

When Windows 10 was a mess, and alot of people fought against switching to it, there was a bigger opportunity for people to be persuaded to use Linux than now. These days alot have switched to Windows 10, and Microsoft has made alot of improvements that have made the OS attractive to gamers. Even Microsoft understood time was important when they decided to support developers in making their games run on Windows 7 with DirectX 12. I argue they did to prevent the developers considering Vulkan. One of those games was World of Warcraft.

I am very grateful for work Codeweavers and Valve have put in, but I wish we got more information on anti cheat. What's holding support back? What does "far off" mean? A year, two, or more? Windows 7 percentage on Steam is at 4.5%, and it's shrinking. The sooner Proton is more complete (anti cheat and mature DX12 support), the better likelihood of persuading these users to switch to Linux.

Also the sooner we get more users, the more desirable Vulkan as API will be. Consequently this will pave way for better native support.


Last edited by Linuxwarper on 16 November 2020 at 12:58 pm UTC
Quoting: LinuxwarperWhen Windows 10 was a mess, and alot of people fought against switching to it, there was a bigger opportunity for people to be persuaded to use Linux than now. These days alot have switched to Windows 10, and Microsoft has made alot of improvements that have made the OS attractive to gamers. Even Microsoft understood time was important when they decided to support developers in making their games run on Windows 7 with DirectX 12. I argue they did to prevent the developers considering Vulkan. One of those games was World of Warcraft.

I am very grateful for work Codeweavers and Valve have put in, but I wish we got more information on anti cheat. What's holding support back? What does "far off" mean? A year, two, or more? Windows 7 percentage on Steam is at 4.5%, and it's shrinking. The sooner Proton is more complete (anti cheat and mature DX12 support), the better likelihood of persuading these users to switch to Linux.

Also the sooner we get more users, the more desirable Vulkan as API will be. Consequently this will pave way for better native support.
Yeah, I think the Windows 10 opportunity has sailed. But there will always be more for as long as they're trying to make money. At some point they will either have a next version or they'll do another trial balloon at trying to make it a subscription.
Quoting: rustybroomhandleI still want to know what the mission is with all of this. Not technically, but from a business perspective.

I get it, Linux customers are paying customers, but Valve have contracted several companies, individuals, fulltime employees, contact with GPU vendors etc. This seems like way more financial and time investment than what our meagre 1-2% is worth.

Exactly this is pretty much what I have been saying from the beginning what is the end game or what do you valve envision being the end game. At this point they must of sunk millions into r & d on linux funding projects addressing mesa vulkan vr kernel and even anti cheat. They are a big corporation how long will they continue funding these projects at a loss because there is no way there are enough linux users gaming that they have clawed all that money back.
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Patreon, Liberapay or PayPal Donation.

We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
Login / Register

Or login with...
Sign in with Steam Sign in with Twitter Sign in with Google
Social logins require cookies to stay logged in.

Livestreams & Videos
Community Livestreams
Latest Forum Posts