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For developers who are building all sorts of software, you now have another choice to get them running on Linux with the release of Uno Platform 3.1.

What is it? The Uno Platform (Pronounced 'Oono' or 'Ouno') is a Universal Windows Platform Bridge that allows UWP-based code (C# and XAML) to run on iOS, Android, macOS, WebAssembly, Linux and Windows 7.

Along with the brand new release, it brings with it Linux support available in preview. This was demonstrated with the Uno Calculator for Linux, which is a port of the Windows Calculator to Linux using the Uno Platform which they did to show as a proof of concept type of thing.

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On Linux, they're relying on Skia to draw the UI on canvas and Shell support with Gtk3. They say it offers up the same consistent look across all platforms, with Uno doing the "heavy lifting for pixel-perfect look". You can develop with it on Linux, with the example they give in their documentation using VS Code.

Always good to see more options.

See the release announcement here.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Misc, Toolkit
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12 comments
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Linas 3 Dec, 2020
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This stuff is really interesting. Anything that reduces the friction between Linux and Windows is a good thing in my book.

At work all our servers are Linux, but desktops are Windows. And it always seemed that these are two separate worlds that have nothing in common. But now a lot of people started using WSL on their desktops for development of our server applications. Some are content with that, and think why would they run Linux when they can do it all in WSL? While others started questioning why do they need Windows at all if they spend all the time in WSL anyway? A double edged sword for sure, but at least people are talking about it now!

As for daily work, all the developer tools, Microsoft Teams, and Skype work natively on Linux. Office 356 runs in a browser anyway. Printers work via CUPS. Windows shares via Samba. Evolution is a great replacement for Outlook, and works just fine with an Exchange server. Surviving as a Linux user in a corporate environment is not nearly as much of a struggle as it has been.
Purple Library Guy 3 Dec, 2020
I dunno. I feel like things are getting too elaborate when you need a whole platform just to play Uno.
randyl 3 Dec, 2020
Quoting: Purple Library GuyI dunno. I feel like things are getting too elaborate when you need a whole platform just to play Uno.
Hahaha, I thought the same thing when I first saw the article title. I was thinking an entire platform for Uno what is this about? It's a neat project. I'm glad to see more cross platform interop.
denyasis 4 Dec, 2020
QuoteThe Uno Platform (Pronounced 'Oono' or 'Ouno')

Wait what? I wasn't confused on how to say it until now. Is it not like the Spanish word? Or am I miss pronouncing the pronunciation? I'm so confused, lol

On a side note, I'm all for compatibility, even if it is with a platform. I seriously would switch to Linux at my work if I could replace my SQL management programs and our GIS program.

I'm sure my IT department would have a meltdown if I tried. I think they are straight windows from the servers to the desktops, with the exception of that one RED HAT server.
tuubi 4 Dec, 2020
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Quoting: denyasisOn a side note, I'm all for compatibility, even if it is with a platform. I seriously would switch to Linux at my work if I could replace my SQL management programs and our GIS program.
Don't know about your GIS program, but DBeaver does the job for me on the SQL front. And I think one co-worker runs HeidiSQL on top of Wine for some reason.
AciD 4 Dec, 2020
....And QGis is a masterpiece
denyasis 4 Dec, 2020
DBeaver looks really nice, I was just looking at it the other day. I will have to give it a spin!

I've heard of QGis. I'll have to check it out.
flesk 6 Dec, 2020
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Quoting: denyasis
QuoteThe Uno Platform (Pronounced 'Oono' or 'Ouno')

Wait what? I wasn't confused on how to say it until now. Is it not like the Spanish word? Or am I miss pronouncing the pronunciation? I'm so confused, lol

I'm not a native English speaker either, but I think you'd normally pronounce it "juno" in English, hence the clarification.

I also have good past experiences with HeidiSQL and DBeaver, although, in my experience, they have trouble refreshing stale connections. For Oracle databases (*ptooey*), SQLDeveloper is pretty good, but it's quite resource hungry, and tends to lock up after a while. These days, the SQL client built into IntelliJ IDEA is my favorite, since it doesn't have either of those issues, is quite feature rich, and I use the IDE for most of my development work anyway.
randyl 6 Dec, 2020
Azure Data Studio ( https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/azure-data-studio/download-azure-data-studio?view=sql-server-ver15 ) also works well for a cross database visual query tool. I haven't run it under Linux though so I'm unsure about its performance or ease of install. It feels like it's built on VSCode, but again that just from casual use not from digging into the workings.

I like it because of the plug-in functionality. I can do some basic sql management tasks, like import flat file wizard, in ADS that used to require a full Sql Server Management Studio install. I don't use it often because I'm usually on a Windows workstation executing queries and just use Linqpad.


Last edited by randyl on 6 December 2020 at 9:27 pm UTC
denyasis 8 Dec, 2020
Thanks for the advice, friends. I didn't get to try anything today, but I'm in "zoom based training" the next two days, which, according to my supervisor, should provide me with a large amount of mandatory free time to play with.

Question for you. I'm new to SQL so this might be dumb. The problem I run into is that the editor needs to talk to OpenEdge... From the 90's... I think version 10?

I know one can openquery, but there are a lot of draw backs, most of which involve my sanity.


I'm currently using MSSMS, which is nice. I'm no admin, I just do queries to pull data for various reports and visualize it in various maps using ArcGis. I'll have to look at azure too, although, I'm a little worried our new Sql database might be a little old. It's been running since 2007.


Last edited by denyasis on 8 December 2020 at 2:35 am UTC
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