Confused on Steam Play and Proton? Be sure to check out our guide.

Are you on Debian and keep missing packages or want some of the latest applications on top of your stable system? Say hello to the brand new Debian User Repository in the style of the Arch User Repository. It only got announced a couple of days ago so it's very fresh-faced and so there's not many packages yet, but it could end up being something revolutionary for Debian - perhaps anyway.

The creator, Hunter Wittenborn, mentioned how they initially started off developing makedeb, which makes Debian packages from Arch PKGBUILDs as they loved "Arch Linux's simple and efficient PKGBUILD format for creating packages". Another project, mpm, came later as a package manager for makedeb to make it even easier. So the Debian User Repository seems like the natural evolution of their ongoing work.

As an Arch Linux user myself (there's a joke there somewhere…) thanks to EndeavourOS making the setup easy I've found the Arch User Repository to often be an invaluable tool.

What do you think? Will you use it or contribute to it or do you not like the idea of it? Let us know in the comments.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Distro News, Meta
29 Likes
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG and Humble Store. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
The comments on this article are closed.
36 comments
Page: «4/4
  Go to:

axredneck 30 Jun, 2021
Quoting: Nibelheim
Quoting: axredneck
Quoting: Nibelheim- It doesn't really support Debian, but Ubuntu and the author consider it "the same" (watch out for names and versions of dependencies which may not be the same between Debian and Ubuntu).
Even Debian has 3 different versions (4 with oldstable) with different versions of libraries. I wonder how these PKGBUILDs will manage this?
(Arch has 2 versions + Manjaro, but they differ very little)

Arch has 1 version since 2017, i686 support stoped. And before, the only difference was just 64 bits libs wasn't accessible to 32 bits Arch. Otherwise, everything was same (packages name etc...)

Manjaro is not Arch. Manjaro use his own repositories. Like Ubuntu is not Debian.

AUR has no Manjaro support. If something is not working on Manjaro, never ask about a fix to an AUR packager...
I meaned 2 versions: stable and testing.
slaapliedje 30 Jun, 2021
View PC info
  • Supporter Plus
Quoting: Nibelheim
Quoting: axredneck
Quoting: Nibelheim- It doesn't really support Debian, but Ubuntu and the author consider it "the same" (watch out for names and versions of dependencies which may not be the same between Debian and Ubuntu).
Even Debian has 3 different versions (4 with oldstable) with different versions of libraries. I wonder how these PKGBUILDs will manage this?
(Arch has 2 versions + Manjaro, but they differ very little)

Arch has 1 version since 2017, i686 support stoped. And before, the only difference was just 64 bits libs wasn't accessible to 32 bits Arch. Otherwise, everything was same (packages name etc...)

Manjaro is not Arch. Manjaro use his own repositories. Like Ubuntu is not Debian.

AUR has no Manjaro support. If something is not working on Manjaro, never ask about a fix to an AUR packager...
I thought Arch supported ARM now?
Nibelheim 30 Jun, 2021
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: Nibelheim
Quoting: axredneck
Quoting: Nibelheim- It doesn't really support Debian, but Ubuntu and the author consider it "the same" (watch out for names and versions of dependencies which may not be the same between Debian and Ubuntu).
Even Debian has 3 different versions (4 with oldstable) with different versions of libraries. I wonder how these PKGBUILDs will manage this?
(Arch has 2 versions + Manjaro, but they differ very little)

Arch has 1 version since 2017, i686 support stoped. And before, the only difference was just 64 bits libs wasn't accessible to 32 bits Arch. Otherwise, everything was same (packages name etc...)

Manjaro is not Arch. Manjaro use his own repositories. Like Ubuntu is not Debian.

AUR has no Manjaro support. If something is not working on Manjaro, never ask about a fix to an AUR packager...
I thought Arch supported ARM now?

ArchARM exist but it's an independant project. You can't find any information about ArchARM on main arch website.

It's another distro based on Arch, maintained partially by the main Arch team.

And yes AUR packages usually works on ArchARM (I use it on PinePhone) but sometimes packages are x86_64 compatible only.
slaapliedje 1 Jul, 2021
View PC info
  • Supporter Plus
Quoting: Nibelheim
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: Nibelheim
Quoting: axredneck
Quoting: Nibelheim- It doesn't really support Debian, but Ubuntu and the author consider it "the same" (watch out for names and versions of dependencies which may not be the same between Debian and Ubuntu).
Even Debian has 3 different versions (4 with oldstable) with different versions of libraries. I wonder how these PKGBUILDs will manage this?
(Arch has 2 versions + Manjaro, but they differ very little)

Arch has 1 version since 2017, i686 support stoped. And before, the only difference was just 64 bits libs wasn't accessible to 32 bits Arch. Otherwise, everything was same (packages name etc...)

Manjaro is not Arch. Manjaro use his own repositories. Like Ubuntu is not Debian.

AUR has no Manjaro support. If something is not working on Manjaro, never ask about a fix to an AUR packager...
I thought Arch supported ARM now?

ArchARM exist but it's an independant project. You can't find any information about ArchARM on main arch website.

It's another distro based on Arch, maintained partially by the main Arch team.

And yes AUR packages usually works on ArchARM (I use it on PinePhone) but sometimes packages are x86_64 compatible only.
Somethings are simply written to only work on x86 or x86_64. Which is why most will end up having to rebuy their software for their Macs when they upgrade to arm ones.
14 3 Jul, 2021
I think it's great. People can do as much or little of their own security reviews. Without the AUR or DUR, you can still go to Github or GitLab or Docker and run like anything. It's very different than picking a release branch because you can literally install one thing from the AUR or DUR, so it's not like you're committing to running a system made of experimental bubblegum.
Vortex_Acherontic 9 Jul, 2021
OBS: Am I joke to you! o.o
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Reward Tiers: Patreon. Plain Donations: Liberapay or PayPal.

This ensures all of our main content remains totally free for everyone with no article paywalls. We also don't have tons of adverts, there's also no tracking and we respect your privacy. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
The comments on this article are closed.