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Frozenbyte being the developer behind titles like the Trine series, Shadwen, Has-Been Heroes and the upcoming Starbase talks a little about Proton and future native Linux support. If you're not clear on what Proton and Steam Play are, be sure to check out our constantly updated dedicated page. It's a special compatibility layer for running Windows games and apps from Steam on Linux.

If you're not aware, Frozenbyte did previously have their games ported over to Linux but they eventually stopped after the release of Shadwen in 2016. The latest Trine 4 and their other titles don't have Linux version. With Starbase that's due to release tomorrow (July 29, 2021), there's a post on the Steam forum from a user asking about Linux support and Frozenbyte developer Jukka Larja (JLarja) replied on July 27 to explain it's not a priority:

With Proton being as good as it is, native support is not very high on our list. In fact (without actually trying the native versions on modern Linux distro) I would recommend Proton emulation over native versions for all the previous games we've released. Changes are you'll get better graphics quality, likely less trouble getting the game running and input working, and possible better performance too. For low-on-resources port Proton is simply superior.

If Linux gaming takes off (for example, because Steam Deck becomes a huge success), then we'll have a reason to consider not-so-low-on-resources port, which may (and probably does) change the picture somewhat. At the moment we have Xbox Series X/S higher on our porting targets list though (not for Starbase currently, but for other future projects).

I imagine there will be plenty more of this, especially for older ports where performance wasn't top and some that might have other issues. Proton isn't just something that's good to ensure Linux gamers and Steam Deck users get to play the latest games, it's also (as even porter Ethan Lee has pointed out), good for being an "essential preservation project" for older Windows games to keep them working nicely.

What is interesting to see is a mention of it being possibility if the Steam Deck is a success. People will argue on one side about there not being a point if Proton gets to the stage where Windows games can just run out of the box on Linux with Proton, but there is the other side that a native Linux build gives developers more control and flexibility on their games compared with handing it all over to Valve. Either way, that and more depends on how the Steam Deck goes.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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mirv 29 Jul
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Quoting: Beamboom
Quoting: ObsidianBlkHonestly, if you feel so adamant that there are games running on a runtime translation layer (Proton/Wine) on Stadia, look one up! Email the question to Google/Stadia directly or even a few of the developers who've ported their games to Stadia. If the feels are there for you that we don't know that there aren't any games on Stadia running through Proton (etc)... find one and sooth those feelings.

I'm not adamant, I just seek to separate facts from assumptions (as we all should, really!).
Like I say, I struggle to see the logic in it. But of course, that is nothing but an assumption on my behalf too, based on my limited insights.

So I simply ask, do we know this? Or do we assume this based on the little we do know? That's what I try to get to the bottom of here. Not to discredit anyone, but too often assumptions gets repeated and establish themselves as "truths" without anyone actually knowing.

But if none of us here actually knows this (and even have a link to support it!), then yeah it's a good idea to send an email to someone inside and ask, absolutely!

https://web.archive.org/web/20200806220626/https://icculus.org/finger/flibitijibibo

Read that.

--edit:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8LaYzXDQkqI

Also look at that.


Last edited by mirv on 29 July 2021 at 12:15 pm UTC
Ardje 29 Jul
Quoting: BeamboomSo I simply ask, do we know this? Or do we assume this based on the little we do know? That's what I try to get to the bottom of here. Not to discredit anyone, but too often assumptions gets repeated and establish themselves as "truths" without anyone actually knowing.
I assume they deliver wine wrapped binaries like porting used to be.
Hmmm, maybe it's like this: the less CPU and GPU your game uses, the less % google will take from your income.
Now *that's* an incentive.
Beamboom 29 Jul
... And just to add to this, if we look at the available games on Stadia today:

https://stadia.google.com/games

Scroll down to the store titles. Do anyone honestly believe that all those titles are really fully ported to Linux? Seriously? Look at that list.

Maybe a custom library or three are added just to add an API to the controllers or something, maybe, but honestly: It simply doesn't add up for me. There has to be a layer of some sort, with the vast majority of the code running being the original windows binaries.


Last edited by Beamboom on 29 July 2021 at 12:32 pm UTC
mirv 29 Jul
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Quoting: Beamboom... And just to add to this, if we look at the available games on Stadia today:

https://stadia.google.com/games

Scroll down to the store titles. Do anyone honestly believe that all those titles are *really* fully ported to Linux? Seriously? Look at that list.

Maybe a custom library or three are added just to add an API to the controllers or something, maybe, but honestly: They can't be fully ported to Linux. It simply doesn't add up. There has to be a layer of some sort, with the vast majority of the code running must be the original windows binaries.

We've gone off topic, so last post on this before I go quiet: yes, they are ported. There are multiple dev talks about how this was all done. Don't forget these games all have ports for windows and all the consoles (most of them will anyway) so it's not so difficult as you might think.
One of the most challenging aspects was actually HLSL -> SPIR-V, and Google invested in that for a reason.
Leopard 29 Jul
Quoting: Beamboom... And just to add to this, if we look at the available games on Stadia today:

https://stadia.google.com/games

Scroll down to the store titles. Do anyone honestly believe that all those titles are really fully ported to Linux? Seriously? Look at that list.

Maybe a custom library or three are added just to add an API to the controllers or something, maybe, but honestly: It simply doesn't add up for me. There has to be a layer of some sort, with the vast majority of the code running being the original windows binaries.

Yes, all of those got ported to Stadia.

If you want i can throw Doom 2016 Stadia port experiences video from id Software dev, comments from Durante ( PC porter that was previously a well famed modder, also does Stadia ports )on Reddit about his Stadia ports and Stadia port requirements , Bungie's Destiny 2 Stadia port experiences video, Ubisoft's Ac Odyssey Stadia port experiences video.

Why those games ported to Stadia and why they don't see daylight for Linux desktop?

- Google pays small fortunes to get those ports on their platform.
- Supporting Stadia as a platform is lot easier than supporting desktop Linux; one driver, one set of hardware, no user input/choice that can cause different behaviour between instances. It is essentially a console but on cloud.
-While in house ports does exists and if they are confident about their Vulkan work it ends up in PC build ( such as Rockstar's RDR2,Vulkan is default api for RDR2 on PC) ; most of those ports were outsourced to porting houses such as QLOC ( Ported Cyberpunk 2077 to Stadia ) with basically zero tests being done on actual PC hw combinations. So neither build itself or VLK backend itself won't end up on PC for such cases.

PS: DXVK-native is also being used for some Stadia ports. Just like how Portal 2, Left 4 Dead 2 Linux ports are using DXVK-native. DXVK-native is meant for usage as a native library. Just name containing DXVK doesn't make it not native.

Stadia doesn't use Wine/doesn't rely on Wine.
Beamboom 29 Jul
Quoting: LeopardWhy those games ported to Stadia and why they don't see daylight for Linux desktop?


Thanks a lot, Leopard!
Amazing. That gotta cost'em a fortune!
Eike 29 Jul
Quoting: constAnyway, they were among the first to jump the Humble Linux train that got everything started and I'll never forget that. Linux gaming today only exists because of some critical events and the HIBs were a key part of this.

Trine 2 was the first game I bought for Linux.
Mohandevir 29 Jul
Quoting: Eike
Quoting: constAnyway, they were among the first to jump the Humble Linux train that got everything started and I'll never forget that. Linux gaming today only exists because of some critical events and the HIBs were a key part of this.

Trine 2 was the first game I bought for Linux.

Yep... Sitting on my couch, my Inspiron N5110 on my lap. Still remember that moment. Good'ol times, when everything felt new!
Eike 29 Jul
Quoting: Mohandevir
Quoting: Eike
Quoting: constAnyway, they were among the first to jump the Humble Linux train that got everything started and I'll never forget that. Linux gaming today only exists because of some critical events and the HIBs were a key part of this.

Trine 2 was the first game I bought for Linux.

Yep... Sitting on my couch, my Inspiron N5110 on my lap. Still remember that moment. Good'ol times, when everything felt new!

It didn't start up at first, all just black, and I wasn't even disappointed, I felt like it had to be like this, 'cause, you know... it's Linux, it cannot be for gaming!
Mohandevir 29 Jul
Quoting: Eike
Quoting: Mohandevir
Quoting: Eike
Quoting: constAnyway, they were among the first to jump the Humble Linux train that got everything started and I'll never forget that. Linux gaming today only exists because of some critical events and the HIBs were a key part of this.

Trine 2 was the first game I bought for Linux.

Yep... Sitting on my couch, my Inspiron N5110 on my lap. Still remember that moment. Good'ol times, when everything felt new!

It didn't start up at first, all just black, and I wasn't even disappointed, I felt like it had to be like this, 'cause, you know... it's Linux, it cannot be for gaming!

My Inspiron had a Radeon HD6470m with 512mb VRAM... Considering the driver support for AMD products, back then... The input lag made the game barely playable... But I kept on gaming, because "It's on Linux and Steam is in beta".


Last edited by Mohandevir on 29 July 2021 at 6:33 pm UTC
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