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The classic Crusader: No Remorse is ready for testing in ScummVM

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Crusader: No Remorse, the classic sci-fi action game from 1995 is getting a new home with ScummVM and you can go ahead and test it right now.

For those unaware ScummVM is a free and open source application that allow you to run tons of classic graphical adventure and role-playing games, as long as you have the data files needed. This allows you to easily play them on modern systems, often with enhancements to make the experience a bit smoother.

Over time the ScummVM project has expanded to include more types of games and following on from supporting Origin Systems classic Ultima games they've moved onto adding in support for Crusader: No Remorse (but Crusader: No Regret is not yet supported).

Need the data files? Thankfully it's another classic you can easily grab DRM-free over on GOG.com. For details on where to put the files check the ScummVM Wiki.

This is another game from my own childhood. I actually had it on the Sega Saturn and thoroughly enjoyed it, looking forward to blasting through on Linux with huge thanks to ScummVM.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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10 comments

dpanter 3 years 19 Jul
Woot! I played both Crusader games a lot back in the day, this is pretty awesome.
Now I only have to decide if I want to play them again and possibly be incredibly disappointed, or continue to enjoy the memories filtered through the rosy lens of nostalgia...
andy155 19 Jul
WOHOOOO!
https://youtu.be/O-0ucoCggEQ


Last edited by andy155 on 19 July 2021 at 4:40 pm UTC
denyasis 19 Jul
They are still good. Played them in 2008 as a "test" of my sound card and amp during my switch to Linux. Best test ever. Prolly still have them on CD some where.

Things that didn't age well... The sound effects, particularly some of the machine guns.

I've always thought of SCUMM as for the adventure games. It makes me wonder what underlying engine Crusader used?
slaapliedje 19 Jul
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Sweet! I was planning on beating this eventually.
Quoting: denyasisThey are still good. Played them in 2008 as a "test" of my sound card and amp during my switch to Linux. Best test ever. Prolly still have them on CD some where.

Things that didn't age well... The sound effects, particularly some of the machine guns.

I've always thought of SCUMM as for the adventure games. It makes me wonder what underlying engine Crusader used?
SCUMM seems to have gone kind of the way GCC did, where it originally was the Gnu C Compiler but eventually was the Gnu Compiler Collection. If I remember right it's at this point a few different engines under one roof.
whizse 19 Jul
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Quoting: denyasisI've always thought of SCUMM as for the adventure games. It makes me wonder what underlying engine Crusader used?
Sounds like it was based on the Ultima 8 engine.
Lightkey 19 Jul
Quoting: Purple Library GuySCUMM seems to have gone kind of the way GCC did, where it originally was the Gnu C Compiler but eventually was the Gnu Compiler Collection. If I remember right it's at this point a few different engines under one roof.
Yes, a few. Not long before it hits the 100 engines mark.

Edit: Just realised, that is a pessimistic count. If you include the unfinished engines in the tree that are not enabled for releases, it's already 93 (although some are just variants of another, like sword1 and sword2) and two of those (Glk and Ultima) are rather frameworks than engines, with their own sub-engines, upping the number to 109!


Last edited by Lightkey on 20 July 2021 at 11:32 pm UTC
Pit 20 Jul
Hehe, just realized that the Windows-version of the game on GOG is powered by dosbox.....
scaine 20 Jul
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Loved this game when I played it... 1996? 1997? Somewhere around there, I think.

I replayed it via Dosbox in the late 2000's and boy it had definitely aged. The control scheme is what tripped me up the most. I'm having that same problem this week with System Shock Remastered. Controls in games back then were awful!
slaapliedje 21 Jul
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Quoting: PitHehe, just realized that the Windows-version of the game on GOG is powered by dosbox.....
Well yeah, because backward compatibility with Windows 10 is terrible. I'm shocked Valve hasn't just outright inserted Proton in between for some of the games even under Windows 10. Would be hilarious if they ran Proton through WSL2 to get better compatibility for older games!
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