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You can now support the Flatpak package format on Open Collective

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Flatpak is the next-generation of packing applications and games for Linux and now you can directly support it.

The idea behind Flatpak is that anything packaged up with it will work across multiple distributions, with a stable environment for everything thanks to common libraries to link against and developers can add any dependencies they need right into the package to ensure it works everywhere. Sandboxing is another prominent feature and one of the main goals of Flatpak packages, to increase security by isolating applications from each other with sandboxing and giving limited access to your operating system.

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There's also Snap packages supported by Canonical as another next-gen format for Linux, but one of the problems there that we've seen people talk often about is how the back-end supporting it all is proprietary and tightly controlled whereas Flatpaks are fully open source. You can learn a lot more about Flatpak at this link.

For Flatpak installs you can use the Flathub website, which is the most convenient but anyone can host their own repository too.

Just recently the team announced they've setup an Open Collective effort to gather more funding, so now you too can help push forward this newer packaging format. Open Collective is pretty slick, as it keeps all the finances open so you can see what goes in and out for it. So if you think Flatpak is important for the future, you can go support it.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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38 comments
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F.Ultra 30 Jul
Quoting: WorMzy
Quoting: F.Ultra
Quoting: PublicNuisanceI don't have a horse in the race but here is an article worth reading as devil's advocate.

https://flatkill.org/2020/

Yes this "next generation" packaging is really the stone age packaging while rpm/apt is the real next-generation. That said, for games the security issues are basically zero (basically but not to 100%) since few games have open external ports or handle random files/data that you feed it like it is for applications.

lol, I've never seen rpm/deb described as 'next-generation'. I can kind of see it with rpm, but deb is something that deserves to be consigned to history as a terrible mistake that future generations should learn from.

Sorry to be so "slashdot" in my reply here but saying so about deb vs rpm show that you don't know how they both actually work. The thing is that rpm and deb are extremely similar with the main difference being that deb:s have far greater helper scripts that among other things means that what does require platform specific .spec files for rpm can be done in a single deb.

RPM/DEB is "next-generation" in the sense that stone age distribution is files in a archive, then came files in a archive with some basic script (this is where the current Windows installers are), then came rpm/deb which is files in a archive with several scripts (pre-install, pre-update, post-install, post-update, post-delete) and most importantly with a dependency tracker. This makes rpm/deb next-generation functionality wise of all the types of packagers available today.

Then comes flatpak, snap and so on which are back to files in a archive but now in a sandbox (sometimes). To me this is a huge step backwards, but it allows the dumb Windows type installers that millions of developers are used to so therefore it became popular.

edit: And I should perhaps add that there are some environments where flatpaks and snaps are the obvious choice and that is for people running virtualized servers.


Last edited by F.Ultra on 30 July 2021 at 2:59 pm UTC
F.Ultra 30 Jul
Quoting: andythe_greatNot even openSUSE and Fedora can share the same spec file (a file that contain build instructions) since they some time use difference RPM macros. Maintaining a package across many distros are very tedious.

Yes that is one of the problems with rpm that is not really there with deb:s (I use the exact same files to build deb:s e.g when building for both Debian and Ubuntu). However in their defence, RPM:s where never intended as being used by third parties, they where intended to be used by the distribution maintainers only and there this problem does not exist. That said this is an are where rpm:s could be greatly enhanced, there is nothing in the format itself that prohibits the same .spec to work between distributions.
Quoting: KlausThe other part (mostly relevant for corporate environments) is that a natively or indistinguishable-from-native running version of Microsoft Office releases from the last ten years isn't optional. I tried with OnlyOffice and LibreOffice, but the moment your working with a customer who uses Microsoft Office, you will need it somehow, or the customer will be annoyed at you for breaking their documents; The only solution working properly here is a virtual machine with Windows and native MS Office.
Office is for sure a big issue. Luckily my work doesn't really fiddle documents in that kind of detailed way where an odd looking font here and there will cause any problems, and I don't use any really advanced spreadsheets, so I can get away with LibreOffice. Which is nice, because I hate the bloody ribbon; at this point, I actually like LibreOffice's UI better. But none of that changes the fact that Office remains the standard and for a whole lot of work-type requirements, from document exchanges to high-end Excel features, you really need it.
Does Office work in Wine these days? Man, if I were massively rich I would pay some outfit to get Office, Acrobat and Photoshop all working hiccup-free on Wine, no muss no fuss, maybe with special installers or something just to give people a button to click.
F.Ultra 30 Jul
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: KlausThe other part (mostly relevant for corporate environments) is that a natively or indistinguishable-from-native running version of Microsoft Office releases from the last ten years isn't optional. I tried with OnlyOffice and LibreOffice, but the moment your working with a customer who uses Microsoft Office, you will need it somehow, or the customer will be annoyed at you for breaking their documents; The only solution working properly here is a virtual machine with Windows and native MS Office.
Office is for sure a big issue. Luckily my work doesn't really fiddle documents in that kind of detailed way where an odd looking font here and there will cause any problems, and I don't use any really advanced spreadsheets, so I can get away with LibreOffice. Which is nice, because I hate the bloody ribbon; at this point, I actually like LibreOffice's UI better. But none of that changes the fact that Office remains the standard and for a whole lot of work-type requirements, from document exchanges to high-end Excel features, you really need it.
Does Office work in Wine these days? Man, if I were massively rich I would pay some outfit to get Office, Acrobat and Photoshop all working hiccup-free on Wine, no muss no fuss, maybe with special installers or something just to give people a button to click.

Office365?
Quoting: F.Ultra
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: KlausThe other part (mostly relevant for corporate environments) is that a natively or indistinguishable-from-native running version of Microsoft Office releases from the last ten years isn't optional. I tried with OnlyOffice and LibreOffice, but the moment your working with a customer who uses Microsoft Office, you will need it somehow, or the customer will be annoyed at you for breaking their documents; The only solution working properly here is a virtual machine with Windows and native MS Office.
Office is for sure a big issue. Luckily my work doesn't really fiddle documents in that kind of detailed way where an odd looking font here and there will cause any problems, and I don't use any really advanced spreadsheets, so I can get away with LibreOffice. Which is nice, because I hate the bloody ribbon; at this point, I actually like LibreOffice's UI better. But none of that changes the fact that Office remains the standard and for a whole lot of work-type requirements, from document exchanges to high-end Excel features, you really need it.
Does Office work in Wine these days? Man, if I were massively rich I would pay some outfit to get Office, Acrobat and Photoshop all working hiccup-free on Wine, no muss no fuss, maybe with special installers or something just to give people a button to click.

Office365?
Dunno. That's the web thing, right? Does it have all the features of the real thing?


Last edited by Purple Library Guy on 31 July 2021 at 6:38 am UTC
Kuduzkehpan 31 Jul
All incompability issues are about how good "support" is. if you support your application it will definitly work with new libraries in new distros thats it. if you dont support it or drop support for it yes. İn some time your app will be dead.
just look at starcraft it just borked in XP outdated libraries. its also borked in windows 10 11 just for outdated starcraft itself. it still works flawless under win95 win98. Or you have to use remastered which is complately working in high res+new libraries with new OSes even works in Linux with 3rd party tools.
About package systems; apt rpm tgz pisi (msi for MS) and so on are the good for precompiled distributing and running apps. But not good for compability,dependency hell,library and peripheral compability issues.
the real thing is compiling from the source it has total compability speed optimizations and so on. But thats stoneage distribution and requires power users to handle errors etc.

either flakpak snap package managers etc.. Linux lacks 1 thing really. one universal distribition system. İmagine you only need 1 type of package and manager. let call it "lpis"
"Linux package installer system" Now we have another diversion beyond snap flat tgz rpm pisi etc etc etc.
We need Standarts Some common things as universal just for more user friendlyness.
Nitsuga 31 Jul
For god sake, please no. Flatpaks are a total disaster.

I don't even agree that much with AppImages, but they just do their work and that's it.

And then you have snap and flatpak, and every kind of derivative crap which just bloats, half works, and makes everything harder (and while being full of security and structural flaws).
F.Ultra 1 Aug
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: F.Ultra
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: KlausThe other part (mostly relevant for corporate environments) is that a natively or indistinguishable-from-native running version of Microsoft Office releases from the last ten years isn't optional. I tried with OnlyOffice and LibreOffice, but the moment your working with a customer who uses Microsoft Office, you will need it somehow, or the customer will be annoyed at you for breaking their documents; The only solution working properly here is a virtual machine with Windows and native MS Office.
Office is for sure a big issue. Luckily my work doesn't really fiddle documents in that kind of detailed way where an odd looking font here and there will cause any problems, and I don't use any really advanced spreadsheets, so I can get away with LibreOffice. Which is nice, because I hate the bloody ribbon; at this point, I actually like LibreOffice's UI better. But none of that changes the fact that Office remains the standard and for a whole lot of work-type requirements, from document exchanges to high-end Excel features, you really need it.
Does Office work in Wine these days? Man, if I were massively rich I would pay some outfit to get Office, Acrobat and Photoshop all working hiccup-free on Wine, no muss no fuss, maybe with special installers or something just to give people a button to click.

Office365?
Dunno. That's the web thing, right? Does it have all the features of the real thing?

I have zero idea, have not touched Office in over 15 years. Considering that Office365 is a subscription service though I guess that it's where the future of Office lies.
kon14 2 Aug
Quoting: ZlopezI'm personally running an ostree distribution...

Update your PC distro specs and join the Silverblue GoL masterrace my dude
s8as8a 2 Aug
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: F.Ultra
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: KlausThe other part (mostly relevant for corporate environments) is that a natively or indistinguishable-from-native running version of Microsoft Office releases from the last ten years isn't optional. I tried with OnlyOffice and LibreOffice, but the moment your working with a customer who uses Microsoft Office, you will need it somehow, or the customer will be annoyed at you for breaking their documents; The only solution working properly here is a virtual machine with Windows and native MS Office.
Office is for sure a big issue. Luckily my work doesn't really fiddle documents in that kind of detailed way where an odd looking font here and there will cause any problems, and I don't use any really advanced spreadsheets, so I can get away with LibreOffice. Which is nice, because I hate the bloody ribbon; at this point, I actually like LibreOffice's UI better. But none of that changes the fact that Office remains the standard and for a whole lot of work-type requirements, from document exchanges to high-end Excel features, you really need it.
Does Office work in Wine these days? Man, if I were massively rich I would pay some outfit to get Office, Acrobat and Photoshop all working hiccup-free on Wine, no muss no fuss, maybe with special installers or something just to give people a button to click.

Office365?
Dunno. That's the web thing, right? Does it have all the features of the real thing?
I think not. For example, last time I checked (quite a long time ago), if I remember correctly, I vaguely remember that it didn't seem possible to insert math equations in Office 365 (but it was possible to use the local client (on Windows 10) and have it synchronize immediately to the web version (so that others using only the web version could see the equations added live)).

If you don't need macro compatibility, perhaps you would also like ONLYOFFICE?

P.S.
https://www.onlyoffice.com/

https://personal.onlyoffice.com/

https://flathub.org/apps/details/org.onlyoffice.desktopeditors


Last edited by s8as8a on 2 August 2021 at 7:57 am UTC
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