Check out our Monthly Survey Page to see what our users are running.

After being in Early Access for close to a month now, Stephan Hövelbrinks has posted a brief summary of sales for Death Trash on Steam across the different platforms.

It's worth reminding that so far the game has been pretty successful, with Hövelbrinks noting previously that the game has sold well enough to cover development and that they can finish it on their own. They've also released a roadmap which goes over their plans.

According to Steam's reporting here's how it's sold so far:

  • Windows - 95.5 %
  • Mac - 2.9 %
  • Linux - 1.6 %
YouTube Thumbnail
YouTube videos require cookies, you must accept their cookies to view. View cookie preferences.
Accept Cookies & Show   Direct Link

Considering Linux has only just recently made it back to a 1% user share on Steam, that result is quite expected. Hopefully though with the Steam Deck coming, developers will begin to see more Linux sales. At least for this game, the developer says it has been worth it "Might seem low for Mac and Linux, but in our case worth it if I consider extra effort vs. extra revenue.". Designing for multi-platform has clearly always been a goal for Hövelbrinks too, when you take a look at the build tool they created to make it easier.

In another Twitter post Hövelbrinks also mentioned "I think I'm so stubborn on making games multi platform because I remember that feeling of being left out around 2005+ when so many companies were leaving PC gaming (my favorite way to play) for greener pastures elsewhere. I don't want anyone to feel being left out."

You can buy it on GOG, itch.io and Steam.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
25 Likes
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG and Humble Store. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
16 comments
Page: 1/2»
  Go to:

Eike 2 Sep
Their comment reminds me of what has been said by the Primordia dev lately. At the moment, native Linux gaming comes mostly from people who are involved enough to want to bring their game to "all" the people and/or those that have such a long and good experience at developing multi platform that the cost is low enough to actually justify it financially.


Last edited by Eike on 2 September 2021 at 10:07 am UTC
begui 2 Sep
View PC info
  • Supporter
Buying this
This is the correct reason to make Linux games. I don't really understand when some developers make a game for a platform that is around 1% of the PC gaming market and then get shocked when we are aren't more than about 1% of their sales. These guys get it, it's about the love of the platform or just simply wanting more people to play your game.
logge 2 Sep
Generally, I would consider cross-platform-development kind of training for the future.
kokoko3k 2 Sep
Quoting: EikeTheir comment reminds me of what has been said by the Primordia dev lately. At the moment, native Linux gaming comes mostly from people who are involved enough to want to bring their game to "all" the people and/or those that have such a long and good experience at developing multi platform that the cost is low enough to actually justify it financially.
Independently of the platform, this is quite obvious and almost a tautology if you're not a benefactor (emphasis added)


Last edited by kokoko3k on 2 September 2021 at 2:30 pm UTC
Eike 2 Sep
Quoting: kokoko3k
Quoting: EikeTheir comment reminds me of what has been said by the Primordia dev lately. At the moment, native Linux gaming comes mostly from people who are involved enough to want to bring their game to "all" the people and/or those that have such a long and good experience at developing multi platform that the cost is low enough to actually justify it financially.
Independently of the platform, this is quite obvious and almost a tautology if you're not a benefactor (emphasis added)

To say it more clearly: I fear some actually support Linux despite making a net loss.
dpanter 2 Sep
It's almost like the benefits of developing a cross-platform application outweighs the cost of the additional work.
denyasis 2 Sep
Quoting: EikeTo say it more clearly: I fear some actually support Linux despite making a net loss.

I think that's believable. One could argue the "loss" is less by looking at it as skill development or training. Probably cheaper in the long run to multiplatform a smaller game at a "loss" and then apply those skills to develop larger, more profitable projects later on.
kokoko3k 2 Sep
Quoting: dpanterIt's almost like the benefits of developing a cross-platform application outweighs the cost of the additional work.
Yeah, It feeds the soul ^_^


Last edited by kokoko3k on 2 September 2021 at 6:58 pm UTC
Quoting: PublicNuisanceThis is the correct reason to make Linux games. I don't really understand when some developers make a game for a platform that is around 1% of the PC gaming market and then get shocked when we are aren't more than about 1% of their sales. These guys get it, it's about the love of the platform or just simply wanting more people to play your game.

Ok, but then when a developer declares they are not developing a native version of their game for Linux, everybody starts complaining how underappreciated the Linux market is and how, supposedly, everybody on Linux would totally buy said game and somehow the entirety of the overall 1% of the Linux segment of the market would be a customer. Then time and time again, when developers actually share sales data, we see it being anywhere between little under 1% to maybe 2% (I think I saw 3%, once), with a definite co-relation between how popular the game is and how small the % of Linux gamers playing is (e.g. the more popular the game the lower % the Linux gamers are).

Don't get me wrong - I am not disagreeing with you. My problem is with the community's attitude in general. It's either: "Why don't you develop a native version - everybody on Linux would buy it?", or: "We're 1% of the market - of course you get around only ~1% of sales on Linux". Damned if you do, damned if you don't...


Last edited by mao_dze_dun on 3 September 2021 at 12:35 pm UTC
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Patreon, Liberapay or PayPal Donation.

This ensures all of our main content remains totally free for everyone with no article paywalls. We also don't have tons of adverts, there's also no tracking and we respect your privacy. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
Login / Register

Or login with...
Sign in with Steam Sign in with Twitter Sign in with Google
Social logins require cookies to stay logged in.

Livestreams & Videos
Community Livestreams
Latest Forum Posts