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The saga continues for the GTA III and Vice City code that was reverse engineered and available on GitHub, as it has now been taken down once again from a DMCA request.

For the second time the code repository on GitHub is no more, with it linking to the public DMCA notice that shows Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp LLP acting for Take-Two Interactive Software. It requested a take down of all repositories (including forks) of the code and brings up the recent lawsuit filed against the developers involved in the code.

It's not exactly unexpected of course. They took it down once, counter-claims were filed to bring them back up and now with the lawsuit in progress it was only a matter of time until they vanished once again.

As we've mentioned before the other reason it's no surprise is that there's plenty of credible leaks out there showing that Take-Two are planning to release Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy – The Definitive Edition which would include GTA 3, GTA Vice City and GTA San Andreas and so Take-Two are trying to protect the IP here (even though you needed to buy the actual games to work with these reverse engineered source ports).

Take-Two have a history of disliking mods for these and more modern games, issuing multiple take-down requests recently as it seems they want as much control as possible every the whole experience.

We don't expect the code to come back to GitHub given the lawsuit.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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53 comments
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mirv 4 Oct
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Quoting: Cyril
Quoting: Beamboom
Quoting: scaineIt would be the kind of brain dead thinking you often see from publishers (re: DRM).
I don't think it's brain dead to defend your own intellectual property. You will have to be on the extreme left politically to think so.

So, you accept DRM and find it a normal/good way (maybe the only way?) to defend their intellectual property?
You accept a system that restrict your freedom of what you buy only because it protect corporations and give them more power?
You will have to be on the extreme right politically to think so.

Nobody was saying that. Can we keep such escalations out of it?

I think we can all agree that take-two and their lawyers are not exactly on the moral high ground, while still being able to discuss that they do have a right to "defend" (I think a better word might be "control") their own IP.
If anybody wants a copy of the code let me know.

Whenever you want to learn the true intent of another person/organization, always watch what they do, not what they say. And Take Two's actions say they specifically want to prevent people from playing their games unless they submit to a very strict platform+software configuration.
F.Ultra 4 Oct
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Quoting: scaineI mean... wow. Yeah, I mean in-game. I wasn't implying that GTA fans like to kill cops in real life? I kinda thought that was obvious, but I suppose I didn't state that explicitly.

Thanks for the clarification, you had me really worried there for a moment!
MayeulC 4 Oct
Interesting TorrentFreak article that goes a bit more in-depth about the lawsuits: https://torrentfreak.com/github-removes-gta-fan-projects-re3-revc-following-new-take-two-dmca-notice-211004/
Quoting: TheSHEEEP
Quoting: BeamboomQuoting: scaine
It would be the kind of brain dead thinking you often see from publishers (re: DRM).
I don't think it's brain dead to defend your own intellectual property.
I don't think so, either.

I do think they are stupid to go about it in that way, but they are fully in their right to do so
Scaine didn't comment on whether they are within their rights to do so. I don't think it's illegal for me to, if I legally own a firearm, use it to literally shoot myself in the foot. But it would be brain-dead for me to do it.
Quoting: Beamboom
Quoting: scaineIf they release their Trilogy at a higher price, it's simple greed. If they release it at a lower price, it's a stupid move that costs them: in sales, in legal fees and in reputation with their fanbase (whatever that might be worth).

It's not just "simply greed". To defend your properties do come at a cost. To choose not to defend your property because the bottom line isn't green enough - now that's rather what one should call greed. To drop it because it doesn't lead to short term immediate economical gain.
You do realize the the whole and only point of laws about "intellectual property" is to allow money to be made from it, right?

Also the whole and only point of the existence of limited liability corporations. Greed is technically their sole raison d'etre.

So, if an entity dedicated solely to making money deploys legal powers created solely to let entities make money, in such a way as to lose them money . . . that's just brain dead. There's no higher purpose to those powers, using them to lose money is just failing on the only level available.


Last edited by Purple Library Guy on 4 October 2021 at 4:56 pm UTC
Beamboom 4 Oct
Quoting: CyrilSo, you accept DRM and find it a normal/good way (maybe the only way?) to defend their intellectual property?

Yeah, the reality being as it is, I support DRM 110%. Of course I do. Especially as a software developer myself for many many years I can *totally* relate to the challenge it must be for the company to suffer a grand scale theft of their hard work and investments.

I do not know your age but you may not have been around back then, but around the turn of the century piracy was well on the way of destroying the entire PC platform as a gaming platform. It was so bad that the developers only had a window of a few days of sales after release before it *completely* died out due to piracy. Dead. What the shops didn't sell the first couple of weeks would very likely be a loss, collect dust.

Back then, when you entered a game store, it was all about consoles. The practically piracy-free platforms completely covered the walls, from floor to roof. A corner deep down in the store there was some top selling PC titles. The rest of the shelves were consoles, consoles, consoles.

Valve pretty much single handedly, via Steam, saved the PC platform as a viable market for games.

Quoting: CyrilYou accept a system that restrict your freedom of what you buy only because it protect corporations and give them more power?
I experience ZERO restrictions on Steam. Zero. Never ever in my 16 years on Steam have I experienced any kind of hindrance. I play anytime anywhere on whatever computer I may have had over the course of these years.
Quite the contrary, what I experience is a free cloud save of all my savegames forever, and a free storage of my entire library of games, ready and available to be installed on new machines whenever, wherever. This service is something I'd PAY for, gladly.

We gotta stop being so damn anal about reasonable DRM systems. It's just fanatic.


Last edited by Beamboom on 4 October 2021 at 5:23 pm UTC
Beamboom 4 Oct
Quoting: Purple Library GuyYou do realize the the whole and only point of laws about "intellectual property" is to allow money to be made from it, right?

Just like any other profession. Are you "greedy" because you work? The laws are there to protect you from theft and exploitation of your work, regardless if you make bicycles, write books or create software.

I can't believe we're still having these discussions around piracy. I really honestly can't believe we've not gotten further.


Last edited by Beamboom on 4 October 2021 at 5:18 pm UTC
TheSHEEEP 4 Oct
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Quoting: BeamboomYeah, the reality being as it is, I support DRM 110%. Of course I do. Especially as a software developer myself for many many years I can *totally* relate to the challenge it must be for the company to suffer a grand scale theft of their hard work and investments.
While that's true, I don't see how it applies here.
This open source project did no harm to anyone - no money was made with it and it did not allow anyone to play the game without paying for it.
Reverse engineered code is also generally not the same as the original code - unless Java, but I have my doubts Vice City was written in Java ;)

Of course, you could just download a pirated copy, and use the assets from that in order to use this project - but if you got as far as downloading a pirated copy, you already did the thing, so...

As I said, they were fully in their right to stop the project, I just completely fail to see how not doing so could have done any damage to them.
Quoting: Beamboom
Quoting: Purple Library GuyYou do realize the the whole and only point of laws about "intellectual property" is to allow money to be made from it, right?

Just like any other profession. Are you "greedy" because you work? The laws are there to protect you from theft and exploitation of your work, regardless if you make bicycles, write books or create software.

I can't believe we're still having these discussions around piracy. I really honestly can't believe we've not gotten further.
As far as I know I was not having a discussion about piracy, because there is in this case no allegation that piracy is going on.
As to what the law is for . . . individual people do what they gotta do. If the law and the system that the law creates is bad, that does not mean everyone living in it is bad. In Pinochet's Chile, the government disappeared thousands of people and was vicious and oppressive. Does that mean every schmoe working for the government, say in vehicle registration or teaching primary school, was evil? Of course not. So no, if I criticize the current system of "intellectual property" that does not mean you are an evil person for working within it. That's how the game works, you're just playing. So please stop taking it all so bloody personally.
But anyhow, the system of intellectual property we have was not put in place for people like you; you are a grudgingly accepted side effect. The current length of US copyright protection, for instance, was put in place specifically for Disney--it is unlikely that you have a real use for copyright protection that lasts until your death plus fifty years. And no real person can afford to patent anything any more.

You talk like anyone who isn't pleased with the current "intellectual property" system must want lawlessness and anarchy. I can't speak for anyone else, but my position is that, duh, bad systems should be replaced by better systems, not by nothing. People tend to by hypnotized by how things currently work where and when they happen to be, into thinking that's the only way things could possibly work, or the only way things could work well. But they worked differently in the past, they work differently in different places, and they will work differently in the future, so refusing to so much as entertain the possibility of things being different is a kind of madness.
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