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Canonical want your feedback on Ubuntu Gaming

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Looks like Canonical, the creator of Ubuntu, want to get in on more Linux Gaming with their Desktop Product Manager starting a new series of blog posts and your feedback is needed.

The first blog post goes over using Steam and Proton, which won't be news to any of our readers, especially with our full guide existing for some time now. What's interesting though, that I had no idea, is that their Desktop Product Manager is Oliver Smith, who previously worked for Creative Assembly as a Producer on the likes of Alien Isolation - which got ported natively to Linux by Feral Interactive.

As for the actual guide, it's a pretty good intro for those who need to point newer users to get setup ready with Steam and try out Proton.

Pictured - Steam on Ubuntu

At the end of it, Smith mentions how "we don’t want to get complacent, we know there is still a lot more we can do to improve the gaming experience on Ubuntu Desktop" and that Canonical is "keen to hear from you on the issues or areas we should focus on in 2022". A post on their official Discourse Forum has been opened to gather feedback.

The first reply on it already jumps right into thing Ubuntu should look to sort, like making Mesa upgrades easier so people don't need to resort to PPAs for new graphics drivers on AMD/Intel, which is often needed to keep up with newer game releases and new Proton releases.

Hopefully this will be the start of Ubuntu making more progress to make gaming great on Ubuntu, and easier overall.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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Anza 29 Nov, 2021
Quoting: ElectricPrismMAKE A ROLLING RELEASE UBUNTU VARIANT

It kind of exists, it's called Debian. You just need to enable the testing (or sid) repositories.
Redface 29 Nov, 2021
Quoting: Anza
Quoting: ElectricPrismMAKE A ROLLING RELEASE UBUNTU VARIANT

It kind of exists, it's called Debian. You just need to enable the testing (or sid) repositories.

Nah, that is Debian, the Ubuntu development version, currently Jammy Jellyfish to be released as 20.04, does come close to a rolling release, but its like Debian testing and unstable affected by freezes, so its not really rolling, but close.

You can also use devel instead of the codename, devel is kind of a symlink to the current development repositories.
slaapliedje 29 Nov, 2021
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Quoting: Redface
Quoting: Anza
Quoting: ElectricPrismMAKE A ROLLING RELEASE UBUNTU VARIANT

It kind of exists, it's called Debian. You just need to enable the testing (or sid) repositories.

Nah, that is Debian, the Ubuntu development version, currently Jammy Jellyfish to be released as 20.04, does come close to a rolling release, but its like Debian testing and unstable affected by freezes, so its not really rolling, but close.

You can also use devel instead of the codename, devel is kind of a symlink to the current development repositories.
Ubuntu just isn't good...
erm, good for a rolling release. There isn't any point, really. It has a release every 6 months. And unless your particular pieces of software you use are actually directly in the Debian repositories, they aren't likely to be updated fast enough to bother any quicker than that anyhow. And even then sometimes you likely don't want it to be that quick. Sure there are times when it's nice.

Really if you want a rolling release where you always have latest/greatest (or pretty damned close) Arch is the way to go.
Anza 29 Nov, 2021
Quoting: RedfaceNah, that is Debian, the Ubuntu development version, currently Jammy Jellyfish to be released as 20.04, does come close to a rolling release, but its like Debian testing and unstable affected by freezes, so its not really rolling, but close.

You can also use devel instead of the codename, devel is kind of a symlink to the current development repositories.

At least according to documentation, Debian unstable (aka. sid) is not subject to freezes. Testing is subject to freezes, so rolling stops for a while (shouldn't called testing rolling release as because of that it's not really one).

However as mentioned, there are other distributions out there that do rolling releases. Those are quickest way to fix the problem instead of waiting Canonical to implement true rolling release. Debian is the most familiar for Ubuntu users, Arch is doing bit of its own thing with AUR and all (which is not bad thing at all).
slaapliedje 29 Nov, 2021
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Quoting: Anza
Quoting: RedfaceNah, that is Debian, the Ubuntu development version, currently Jammy Jellyfish to be released as 20.04, does come close to a rolling release, but its like Debian testing and unstable affected by freezes, so its not really rolling, but close.

You can also use devel instead of the codename, devel is kind of a symlink to the current development repositories.

At least according to documentation, Debian unstable (aka. sid) is not subject to freezes. Testing is subject to freezes, so rolling stops for a while (shouldn't called testing rolling release as because of that it's not really one).

However as mentioned, there are other distributions out there that do rolling releases. Those are quickest way to fix the problem instead of waiting Canonical to implement true rolling release. Debian is the most familiar for Ubuntu users, Arch is doing bit of its own thing with AUR and all (which is not bad thing at all).
Debian Sid is basically a rolling release. There is usually a bit of a hiccup during the freeze of testing, but it isn't very long. But there is also a period of 'unrest' right after a new stable version is released. This is due to a ton of new packages and version bumps that flood into Sid. Historically there can be pretty nasty breakages during this point. But as long as you use upgrade, and not dist-upgrade, it is fine.
Redface 30 Nov, 2021
Quoting: Anza
Quoting: RedfaceNah, that is Debian, the Ubuntu development version, currently Jammy Jellyfish to be released as 20.04, does come close to a rolling release, but its like Debian testing and unstable affected by freezes, so its not really rolling, but close.

You can also use devel instead of the codename, devel is kind of a symlink to the current development repositories.

At least according to documentation, Debian unstable (aka. sid) is not subject to freezes. Testing is subject to freezes, so rolling stops for a while (shouldn't called testing rolling release as because of that it's not really one).

However as mentioned, there are other distributions out there that do rolling releases. Those are quickest way to fix the problem instead of waiting Canonical to implement true rolling release. Debian is the most familiar for Ubuntu users, Arch is doing bit of its own thing with AUR and all (which is not bad thing at all).

See https://lists.debian.org/debian-devel-announce/2021/06/msg00000.html for the full freeze announcement of Buster which links to https://release.debian.org/bullseye/freeze_policy.html#full

QuoteNo changes in unstable that are not targeted for bullseye

Don't upload changes to unstable that are not targeted for bullseye. Having changes in unstable that are not targeted/appropriate for bullseye could complicate fixes for your package and related packages (like dependencies and reverse dependencies).

That means while sid/unstable is not technically frozen there are almost no newer versions during that time, mostly bugfixes, and newer versions only as exception.

I can tell from experience that running sid is very similar running the Ubuntu development version.
And since Ubuntu is closer to Ubuntu than Debian or Arch then Ubuntu development is the closest to a rolling release Ubuntu.

Instead of release upgrading to the next development release which opens days after the release of the current one, you also can change your repositories to use devel instead of the codename, either manually or with the https://github.com/wimpysworld/rolling-rhino script.
Redface 30 Nov, 2021
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: Anza
Quoting: RedfaceNah, that is Debian, the Ubuntu development version, currently Jammy Jellyfish to be released as 20.04, does come close to a rolling release, but its like Debian testing and unstable affected by freezes, so its not really rolling, but close.

You can also use devel instead of the codename, devel is kind of a symlink to the current development repositories.

At least according to documentation, Debian unstable (aka. sid) is not subject to freezes. Testing is subject to freezes, so rolling stops for a while (shouldn't called testing rolling release as because of that it's not really one).

However as mentioned, there are other distributions out there that do rolling releases. Those are quickest way to fix the problem instead of waiting Canonical to implement true rolling release. Debian is the most familiar for Ubuntu users, Arch is doing bit of its own thing with AUR and all (which is not bad thing at all).
Debian Sid is basically a rolling release. There is usually a bit of a hiccup during the freeze of testing, but it isn't very long. But there is also a period of 'unrest' right after a new stable version is released. This is due to a ton of new packages and version bumps that flood into Sid. Historically there can be pretty nasty breakages during this point. But as long as you use upgrade, and not dist-upgrade, it is fine.

Yeah, and from a user standpoint its the same when running the Ubuntu development release and then after release immediately going to the next, or by tracking devel in the first place.
Anza 30 Nov, 2021
Quoting: RedfaceSee https://lists.debian.org/debian-devel-announce/2021/06/msg00000.html for the full freeze announcement of Buster which links to https://release.debian.org/bullseye/freeze_policy.html#full

QuoteNo changes in unstable that are not targeted for bullseye

Don't upload changes to unstable that are not targeted for bullseye. Having changes in unstable that are not targeted/appropriate for bullseye could complicate fixes for your package and related packages (like dependencies and reverse dependencies).

That means while sid/unstable is not technically frozen there are almost no newer versions during that time, mostly bugfixes, and newer versions only as exception.

I was reading the same document earlier and missed that part. So Debian testing and unstable are more of a rolling release with hiccups about every two years or so.
slaapliedje 1 Dec, 2021
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Quoting: Anza
Quoting: RedfaceSee https://lists.debian.org/debian-devel-announce/2021/06/msg00000.html for the full freeze announcement of Buster which links to https://release.debian.org/bullseye/freeze_policy.html#full

QuoteNo changes in unstable that are not targeted for bullseye

Don't upload changes to unstable that are not targeted for bullseye. Having changes in unstable that are not targeted/appropriate for bullseye could complicate fixes for your package and related packages (like dependencies and reverse dependencies).

That means while sid/unstable is not technically frozen there are almost no newer versions during that time, mostly bugfixes, and newer versions only as exception.

I was reading the same document earlier and missed that part. So Debian testing and unstable are more of a rolling release with hiccups about every two years or so.
Basically. Every 6 months, Ubuntu snags a snapshot from Debian and tweaks the stuff and tries to stabilize it and then does a release.
I just stick with Debian Sid as everytime I have strayed, I have not been happy. Unless I require stable (like on servers) then I stick to the Stable branch of Debian.
slaapliedje 1 Dec, 2021
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Quoting: Redface
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: Anza
Quoting: RedfaceNah, that is Debian, the Ubuntu development version, currently Jammy Jellyfish to be released as 20.04, does come close to a rolling release, but its like Debian testing and unstable affected by freezes, so its not really rolling, but close.

You can also use devel instead of the codename, devel is kind of a symlink to the current development repositories.

At least according to documentation, Debian unstable (aka. sid) is not subject to freezes. Testing is subject to freezes, so rolling stops for a while (shouldn't called testing rolling release as because of that it's not really one).

However as mentioned, there are other distributions out there that do rolling releases. Those are quickest way to fix the problem instead of waiting Canonical to implement true rolling release. Debian is the most familiar for Ubuntu users, Arch is doing bit of its own thing with AUR and all (which is not bad thing at all).
Debian Sid is basically a rolling release. There is usually a bit of a hiccup during the freeze of testing, but it isn't very long. But there is also a period of 'unrest' right after a new stable version is released. This is due to a ton of new packages and version bumps that flood into Sid. Historically there can be pretty nasty breakages during this point. But as long as you use upgrade, and not dist-upgrade, it is fine.

Yeah, and from a user standpoint its the same when running the Ubuntu development release and then after release immediately going to the next, or by tracking devel in the first place.
Except that Ubuntu now wants you to use snaps instead of .debs.
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