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Capcom shows off official video of Devil May Cry 5 on the Steam Deck

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As more developers get their hands on a Steam Deck devkit, we're seeing plenty more show their games and now Capcom has taken a turn with Devil May Cry 5.

Unlike a lot of what we've seen previously via small clips or plain pictures on Twitter, Capcom went a tiny step further by making a video on their official Capcom USA YouTube Channel - that's quite a bit of extra advertisement power there for the Steam Deck.

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The video description notes the gameplay is being presented by the Lead Game Designer.

That looks like it runs very nicely too, very smooth action. Not totally unexpected though, since Devil May Cry 5 has worked well with Steam Play Proton for quite a while now. Since the Steam Deck resolution is only 1280 x 800px, most games should hopefully scale down quite well for it.

In case you missed it: Proton 6.3-8 was recently released. With more games working, DLSS for DirectX 11 and 12, CEG DRM support and more.

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Whitewolfe80 26 Nov, 2021
Quoting: rustybroomhandle
Quoting: benjamimgoisI think that's big ! Until now, we only saw indies and small games making steam deck videos on twitter. A official video from a AAA studio may get the attencion of others.

Well we've seen Witcher 3 posted by CDPR also. And from Valve, Control, Doom Eternal, Jedi Fallen Order.

Well yeah but all accounts they were part way through porting before there feeling were hurt on twitter and cancelled it and Capcom promised DMC 5 and Street Fighter 5 at E3 a long while back so good they finally are sort of on linux but not so good they were not native as promised i wanna say E3 2017 but i might be wrong.
Linuxwarper 27 Nov, 2021
Quoting: mirvIt's amazing how when a company senses a marketing opportunity like this suddenly the impossible can happen.

Releasing on GNU/Linux can't be done!
Oh, Stadia appears? Sure, not a problem.
Steam Deck appears? Sure, not a problem (especially when someone else does the work).

But, to be clear, I see this as the same case with Stadia. Capcom might well support (or not) the Deck officially (and if they're putting it on their official youtube channel, they support it now!) but it's only the Deck they support. It's not GNU/Linux desktop, and they aren't going to magically make native games available.

And I know that, for now, if it works on the Deck then it's likely to work elsewhere (so long as Steam is there). With Stadia though there was a community expecting more to come of it, and there wasn't. I think it's the same - the game is still a Windows title, Capcom isn't supporting GNU/Linux, they are only supporting their Windows game running on the Deck and nothing more.

Not trying to be a buzzkill; whether this is overall good or bad I won't comment on (I do have opinions there, but not writing them here at the moment). I'm just trying to get perspective on what the deal really is: to Capcom this isn't GNU/Linux, this is something closer to Just Another Console(tm).

Anyone telling themselves companies are posting videos for sake of GNU/Linux are fools. They are doing it because of Deck. But Deck isn't same as Stadia. Where Deck has direct benefits, e.g Proton which is available for desktop, Stadia has little. Proton also counts as a purchase for Linux desktop. Stadia resulted in no native builds for Linux and every purchase there goes towards the business of streaming replacing local play. As opposed to a future of gaming where streaming supplements local play. We aren't stupid people, we know what will happen when companies like Google come on top. They would pull a tactic that would cement streaming as the only way to play games. It would gradually happen as years go by. I still find it so funny how their moto is "A place for all ways we play" yet their gaming platform (Stadia) is so limited.

Deck on other hand:
- Emulators
- Lots stores
- Lots streaming options

If I believed Stadia would not negatively affect gaming, hell I believe Netflix's offering will too, I would not say a word. But I dont believe Stadia and Netflix's offering will better gaming. With or without these big companies, streaming games has a strong future. So streaming advancements with or without these companies, who want to have their hands on streaming's life pulse, would just be delayed. I rather that happen than put at risk local play by giving money to these companies who want their greedy hands on gaming.
mirv 27 Nov, 2021
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Quoting: Mohandevir
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Nocifer
Quoting: mirvto Capcom this isn't GNU/Linux, this is something closer to Just Another Console(tm).

And that's more than fine for the time being. Every journey begins with a first step, does it not? At this point all we really want and all we can really ask for is that games can run in an easy and competitive (performance-wise) manner on Linux, so that PC users aren't forced to use Windows if they want to also play games; and the Steam Deck's success will facilitate that. If and when this success becomes a reality, then we can start asking for more.

Sames arguments were made for Stadia too.

The Deck might differ if people are convinced to use the desktop mode, but phones have had exactly that and it's changed nothing. There's just no incentive that I can see.
Purely guesswork on all our parts of course, but I'm going with it won't change anything on the desktop.

You are comparing ARM hardware with x86... There is absolutely no hardware interrelations between them. Same for Stadia, there are no interrelations with the desktop; you can't run stadia on any hardware. Steam, on the other hand... SteamOS is Steam Linux both on x86 platform. Proton works on both too... Same underlying tech... The link cannot be clearer.

It's not the underlying tech part that matters, it's the usage as a desktop. To get people switching, they'll very likely be "tech literate" and want to play (in which case they probably already trying GNU/Linux or looking for an excuse to), or it will provide an experience that they need. Just look at Apple: they moved from PowerPC to x86_64 to arm, the underlying hardware doesn't particularly matter.

What I was more referring to was that the Deck won't replace anyone already using a laptop, or a desktop, and so it becomes viewed as another device alongside existing electronics - like the Switch, or PSP. Certainly very interesting from a geek toy perspective, but I don't see it driving GNU/Linux adoption on the desktop unless people actually start to use it day to day in desktop mode (which phones offered, but nobody took up).

--edit: Deck will absolutely help people already using GNU/Linux of course. It might even help those not using Steam simply because funding for DXVK and upstream wine changes will help anyone wanting to run games from, say, GOG. I do of course hope that native games for the Deck will appear (there are technical benefits that I can think of) which helps even more.


Last edited by mirv on 27 November 2021 at 1:03 am UTC
elmapul 27 Nov, 2021
Quoting: mirvIt's amazing how when a company senses a marketing opportunity like this suddenly the impossible can happen.

Releasing on GNU/Linux can't be done!
Oh, Stadia appears? Sure, not a problem.
Steam Deck appears? Sure, not a problem (especially when someone else does the work).


the reason why they relased for stadia was: they were paid in advance, so they didnt had to take any risk.
take RE 7,8 for example, there was an rumor/leak that google paid then 10 millions to port both games to stadia.
if the cost of the port is 8 millions, capcom just made 2 millions in profit without a single sale!
if they used the same engine to make both games, than the cost of porting is shared across then (eg: they just need to port their engine and the game come as result)
i'm not sure on how much it cost to port anything else, but we can be sure that almost no company will do that for free.

indies do, because they have projects with an small cost of production and small audience, so any new audience is welcome, porting their games is cheaper , linux has fewer users but the total number of user still is greater than the audience of most of those games and the lack of competition is an big incentive (or at least it was during the era of the 5 first humble bundles)

big companies on the other hand, either will lose money in the port, lose in the support (since linux is super fragmented and updates often break thirdy party things) and even if they made a profit, their stake holders will not be happy on how they are using the money.

you can be sure that if investing in capcom returns 2 dollars for each dollar that you invest, and investing in rockstar returns 10 dollars for each dollar spent, most investors will invest in rockstar instead, considering that, why do you think its a good idea to invest on linux?

its not, they are supporting steam deck because there is a demand for that and valve is taking almost all the risk, stadia seemed promissing and failed to deliver the audience they expected but still, they are paid to port.
oh yeah, i forgot to mention the risks of damaging their brand supporting an platform that may create aditional bugs for then, and who will get the blame? linux? or their game? go figure, we lose anyway.
not to mention what happens to the companies who did supported us.

when mass effect2 was originally ported to ps3, they used translation layers since it was cheaper to port using then, it caused a few performance issues but the profit were so big that the port paid itself and they invested aditional money to fix the issues, they took the parts who strugle to run at an good framerate, and converted the code to native and more optimized code.

when cdpr ported witcher 2 to linux? they deply regreted, we complained a lot about not being 100% an native port, the sales were not enough to justify porting the witcher 3 wich was planned, and the worst part: the desktop didnt grow (wich was expected) and the steam machines didnt sold well (wich they were couting on to justify the costs of porting)
this problem is not exclusive to linux, ask any company why they droped the support for nintendo platforms.

now, let me ask you something:
would you invest in a company that is betting on linux desktop or an console like steam machines? i know i wouldnt, because i would lose money for sure.
steam machines didnt had exclusives (back in the days that exclusives were a thing), nor any reason to exist aside from promoting linux for people that for some reason dont care in spending more money to get less games.

now... would you invest in a platform if someone else took all the risks? and that the public seems interested in this machine because it allow then to game on the go?
or an platform that some one gave you some guaranteed money to support?
for me, of course i would!

we think in linux as an good deal for companies,because we want to deffend or own interests (being able to play on our favorite platform) but we "forget" that they are defending their own interests too...

another thing to consider:
what if you port the game for linux for free, then some company like valve offer you 10 millions to port the game? oh wait, you would never receive this proposal, because its already ported!
why would an compay port an game to stadia for free, to try to help google expand the market and make money in the process, if they are most likely to lose money instead and lose the opportunity of pressuring google to pay for their valuable franchises...
especially considering that google will make money by selling those same games!
and if google isnt willing to invest, well, if they dont want to invest in their own platform, why would you? if they arent willing to pay you, that just show how insecure they are that their platform will be an sucess, so why should YOU take the risk?

and speaking of it, if we are so sure that linux is so promissing, maybe we should become stake holders of companies who bet on its sucess...

and... one sugestion for an company that is considering an port:
do an crowd funding campaing, let us take all the risks, if there is enough demmand to cover the cost of porting+profits why not?
i think they dont do because begging for money dont sound good.
elmapul 27 Nov, 2021
Quoting: mirvIt's not GNU/Linux desktop, and they aren't going to magically make native games available.
as they say, when the service is free, you are the product.
why do you think companies in linux break backward compatibility all the time?
to force companies to pay for techinical support.
i hate to say that, but i think canonical and others are selling US.
want to reach those millions of ubuntu users? want to make sure that your app wont break in our next update? then pay us, because, you know, it would be a shame if anything break, right?

sorry if it sounds like conspiration theory, it is.

i always thought that free software was made by people for people, and companies had an symbiotic relationship with us.

but honestly? its harder and harder to believe that narrative, mint broke compatibility with snapes claiming that they were an proprietary form of distribution or that canonical was the only repo or something, but then, why they support steam? if we keep fighting each other for who gonna be the standard, then an proprietary stard will emerge and dominate the market.

we may demonize an proprietary codecs because they arent open source or compatible with open source, they are evil , etc.
we may demonize drm and anti cheat.
we may demonize everything for the sake of freedom, but at the end of the day, what we end up with?
an phone that cant do phonecalls nor run any modern app?
we need an product, we need some form of pragmatism, the key here is not to become an windows 2, nor an linux as is, microsoft may seem closed, but they are quite open compared to an console, windows is an midle term between total lock down like consoles and totally "freedom" like linux, we are giving "more freedom" but freedom to do what? we didnt had any game engine up until a few years ago, so we didnt gave our users "the freedom to make the games they wanted" just the freedom to customize their workflow, with bad tools to make games.

speaking of pragmatism:
amazon may have sounded like an bad option, but at least it would make some profits for canonical, wich would make linux grow, wich would make more apps and games run on it, giving another option of operating system for the masses.
we didnt accepted the money and guess who did? microsoft!
now they make even more profits, and their users have to suffer even more using their operating system, without having any option to run for, since linux dont run most of their softwares and games, ie, its not an option for then.


Quoting: mirvWith Stadia though there was a community expecting more to come of it, and there wasn't. I think it's the same - the game is still a Windows title, Capcom isn't supporting GNU/Linux

this is something closer to Just Another Console(tm).

speaking of consoles, i dont doubt that sony has something akin to proton on their console.
i was reading about the apis that developers use to make games...

looks like the technology that dominated the shaders was based on an solution from microsoft (eg : pixel shader or something)
while the technology for something else was based on a sony api.

we dont have just directX, openGL and Vulkan, consoles have their own things and sometimes games are ported to pc from some of those apis.

i dont think those big games are 100% native on any platform aside from the last years of the life of such platform.
part of the code runing on pc may be an translation layer from some playstation api, part of the code running on playstation is based on direct, etc.
elmapul 27 Nov, 2021
Quoting: MohandevirYou are comparing ARM hardware with x86... There is absolutely no hardware interrelations between them. Same for Stadia, there are no interrelations with the desktop; you can't run stadia on any hardware. Steam, on the other hand... SteamOS is Steam Linux both on x86 platform. Proton works on both too... Same underlying tech... The link cannot be clearer.

except that Stadia IS x86

Quoting: LinuxwarperDeck on other hand:
- Emulators
- Lots stores
- Lots streaming options

you forgot the mods

Quoting: MohandevirEdit2: Specialized? Please define... To me, it's still Arch Linux, with the same drivers and KDE desktop. Certainly it will have a minimal set of software pre-installed... I would have used the term "barebone". Which might be less scary for newcomers.

Steam Deck Desktop Mode

Looks like a standard KDE desktop to me...
specialized because its a frozen OS, all the updates will be delivered as... i dont remember the term, but read only.
you cant install .debs, rpms or whatever arch use without unlocking the developer mode first.

and i'm not sure about gog games (last time i checked the installer was an .sh file)

------------
as for linux increassing the linux marketshare on desktop...
well people played on consoles in the past and they didnt used linux on desktop, despite not needing windows for gaming, so i dont know...
there is a few big differences now, flash is "dead" and flash had an horrible performance on linux, flash was "replaced" with html5 wich works well.
(i said between air quotes because nothing was ported to html5 and the flash emulators arent perfect)

there are more programs for the mainstream public (eg: video editors etc), and people will be buying an device that just happens to be an linux device, they might as well discover/explore the desktop mode, and feel in love with the customization options.


Last edited by elmapul on 27 November 2021 at 5:21 am UTC
jens 27 Nov, 2021
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Quoting: mirvWhat I was more referring to was that the Deck won't replace anyone already using a laptop, or a desktop, and so it becomes viewed as another device alongside existing electronics - like the Switch, or PSP. Certainly very interesting from a geek toy perspective, but I don't see it driving GNU/Linux adoption on the desktop unless people actually start to use it day to day in desktop mode (which phones offered, but nobody took up).

Yeah I see your point. One effect (additional to the overall improvements to the Linux stack as you already mentioned) might be this: Playing with the Deck people might get interested in Linux and they even like it. At the same time some popular laptop vendors are offering Linux as the default OS installation on their to be sold unit. May be the Deck might help to get some people to go for a preinstalled Linux on their next model.
Not sure if this is far fetched, but I'm certain this is a long game and no single action will change things from one day to another.


Last edited by jens on 27 November 2021 at 9:40 am UTC
ElamanOpiskelija 27 Nov, 2021
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Now I want to give the counter-point: what if this has more impact on Linux users than anything else, at the end of the day?

After all, nobody's got the consumer Steam Deck in their hands yet. And there is a good chance that there's so much demand that Valve cannot fabricate enough consoles anyway. Hell, it's been difficult to meet demand even for niche stuff like the Aya Neo.
F.Ultra 27 Nov, 2021
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Quoting: elmapul
Quoting: mirvIt's not GNU/Linux desktop, and they aren't going to magically make native games available.
as they say, when the service is free, you are the product.
why do you think companies in linux break backward compatibility all the time?
to force companies to pay for techinical support.
i hate to say that, but i think canonical and others are selling US.
want to reach those millions of ubuntu users? want to make sure that your app wont break in our next update? then pay us, because, you know, it would be a shame if anything break, right?

sorry if it sounds like conspiration theory, it is.

Yes it both sounds like and is a conspiracy theory because that is not how reality works. There are no companies that create apps from which the likes of Canonical can blackmail money from. Nor are enterprises paying Red Hat for support due to their systems breaking left and right.
F.Ultra 27 Nov, 2021
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Quoting: ElamanOpiskelijaNow I want to give the counter-point: what if this has more impact on Linux users than anything else, at the end of the day?

After all, nobody's got the consumer Steam Deck in their hands yet. And there is a good chance that there's so much demand that Valve cannot fabricate enough consoles anyway. Hell, it's been difficult to meet demand even for niche stuff like the Aya Neo.

Well it should, if it works on the Deck it will work on your Linux. That is the difference with Stadia where the port could be (and was) locked away internally.
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