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Capcom shows off official video of Devil May Cry 5 on the Steam Deck

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As more developers get their hands on a Steam Deck devkit, we're seeing plenty more show their games and now Capcom has taken a turn with Devil May Cry 5.

Unlike a lot of what we've seen previously via small clips or plain pictures on Twitter, Capcom went a tiny step further by making a video on their official Capcom USA YouTube Channel - that's quite a bit of extra advertisement power there for the Steam Deck.

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The video description notes the gameplay is being presented by the Lead Game Designer.

That looks like it runs very nicely too, very smooth action. Not totally unexpected though, since Devil May Cry 5 has worked well with Steam Play Proton for quite a while now. Since the Steam Deck resolution is only 1280 x 800px, most games should hopefully scale down quite well for it.

In case you missed it: Proton 6.3-8 was recently released. With more games working, DLSS for DirectX 11 and 12, CEG DRM support and more.

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Mohandevir 27 Nov, 2021
Quoting: elmapul
Quoting: MohandevirYou are comparing ARM hardware with x86... There is absolutely no hardware interrelations between them. Same for Stadia, there are no interrelations with the desktop; you can't run stadia on any hardware. Steam, on the other hand... SteamOS is Steam Linux both on x86 platform. Proton works on both too... Same underlying tech... The link cannot be clearer.

except that Stadia IS x86

Except you can't run Stadia or Stadia games locally, on any hardware. The hardware platform is not relevant, in this particular case. Sorry if it wasn't clear enough.
elmapul 28 Nov, 2021
Quoting: MohandevirExcept you can't run Stadia or Stadia games locally, on any hardware. The hardware platform is not relevant, in this particular case. Sorry if it wasn't clear enough.
no you are not clear at all.
you tried to justify that android didnt helped the linux desktop because android is (mostly) arm devices...
but then you quoted stadia as if it was in the same category as android, and its not...
slaapliedje 28 Nov, 2021
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Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Nocifer
Quoting: mirvto Capcom this isn't GNU/Linux, this is something closer to Just Another Console(tm).

And that's more than fine for the time being. Every journey begins with a first step, does it not? At this point all we really want and all we can really ask for is that games can run in an easy and competitive (performance-wise) manner on Linux, so that PC users aren't forced to use Windows if they want to also play games; and the Steam Deck's success will facilitate that. If and when this success becomes a reality, then we can start asking for more.

Sames arguments were made for Stadia too.

The Deck might differ if people are convinced to use the desktop mode, but phones have had exactly that and it's changed nothing. There's just no incentive that I can see.
Purely guesswork on all our parts of course, but I'm going with it won't change anything on the desktop.
How will this not change anything on the desktop? Will it bring more users to use Desktop Linux? Probably not. Will it bring more games that are playable on Desktop Linux? 100% it will, as it's using the exact same software on the Deck. That's where Stadia was garbage, it's all hidden on Google's servers, never to be seen by us 'normies'.
fenglengshun 28 Nov, 2021
Damn, that's nice. I've played the game on an Arch-based KDE system, but currently I have issues with the cutscenes being weirdly unstable in framerate, but that seems to be fixed here.
Purple Library Guy 28 Nov, 2021
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Nocifer
Quoting: mirvto Capcom this isn't GNU/Linux, this is something closer to Just Another Console(tm).

And that's more than fine for the time being. Every journey begins with a first step, does it not? At this point all we really want and all we can really ask for is that games can run in an easy and competitive (performance-wise) manner on Linux, so that PC users aren't forced to use Windows if they want to also play games; and the Steam Deck's success will facilitate that. If and when this success becomes a reality, then we can start asking for more.

Sames arguments were made for Stadia too.

The Deck might differ if people are convinced to use the desktop mode, but phones have had exactly that and it's changed nothing. There's just no incentive that I can see.
Purely guesswork on all our parts of course, but I'm going with it won't change anything on the desktop.
How will this not change anything on the desktop? Will it bring more users to use Desktop Linux? Probably not. Will it bring more games that are playable on Desktop Linux? 100% it will, as it's using the exact same software on the Deck. That's where Stadia was garbage, it's all hidden on Google's servers, never to be seen by us 'normies'.
Google in general seem to be very good at making use of Linux in ways that you would think would be good for Linux more generally, but managing to avoid letting that happen. I don't know if they have some reason to want to do that or if it's just by accident, but so far they've been pretty consistent about it.
elmapul 28 Nov, 2021
Quoting: Purple Library GuyGoogle in general seem to be very good at making use of Linux in ways that you would think would be good for Linux more generally, but managing to avoid letting that happen. I don't know if they have some reason to want to do that or if it's just by accident, but so far they've been pretty consistent about it.

speaking of it i have 2 things to comment.

1)valve and google are in different positions, valve business model was treated by microsoft, so they invested in linux in order to survive, for then it makes no difference if you gonna play on windows, mac or linux as long as you purchase games on steam and the games that you purchase dont stop working on OS updates.

microsoft could try to use tatics like "stuff that you purchase on windows store will work forever, stuff that you purchased elsewhere may break on windows update"
or no guarantee for either, but at least the games you purchase on their store are cross buying meaning that you still can play on xbox...
or things like that, they can try to induce people to use their store, so valve invested in linux in order to secure their independence, and they need linux to be an strong OS to give users an alternative for windows, no matter who make the operating system, if it gonna be thenselves or others, if one of the other linux vendors break stuff, then the users can simply migrate to another distro unlike what happens on windows.

that is why valve is creating an symbiotic relationship with us.

google on the other hand is kinda "too big to fail", but they did bet in independence in the past, they did an partnership with mozilla for the same reasons, they didnt wanted microsoft to control the browser market that would affect then back in the days their only product was google search, now that they have chrome , android youtube etc they arent so dependent on mozilla to help then survice, especially considering that the days of full proprietary browsers and internet explorer dominance in general are gone.

and why google dont make decisions that benefit both their products (android, chromeOS, Stadia) and linux in general? well

2)did you guys remember that Nintendo strugled to get support from thirdy parties some times?
for example in the n64 era, gamecube era, WiiU era they didnt had support from thridy parties!
they always did fine on protables, but sony was the one struggling...

now think about this for a moment: what is stoping other companies from relasing an machine running linux?
if nintendo relased their own "nintendo deck" or something, they would skip the strugle of getting thirdy party support thanks to things like proton, while they (maybe?) still could have an proprietary store front as the only way to acess games in their hardware.
the same goes for sony.

i dont know if they can do that without voiding gpl, but i think they can, and if they can, what valve is doing, may not help only thenselves but their competitors too! but there isnt any guarantee that their competitors will return the favor, nintendo wont allow steam on their console nor port nintendo games to generic steamOS/linux , sony and nintendo still can create apis that better integrate with their own hardware and try to convince developers who want squeeze maximum performance on their hardwares to use then instead of something like directx over proton or vulkan (im not talking about complete ports, but porting the code that is nescessary to port in order to reach an good framerate)

i dont think google will do anything that help their competitors too much , unlike valve who depend on our help to survive and grow this market, google is big enough to try to enter the gaming market with their own money, without much help from volunteers in an "winner takes it all" model.

speaking of nintendo, sony and maybe even others relasing linux consoles, it wont be their first time!
nes mini and snes mini, playstation classic, sega game gear micro, some sega arcades, the new atari vcs, intelvision amiico and a lot of micro consoles (consoles from smaller companies are based on linux.
its Strange to see that valve was kinda right, linux is the future...
Purple Library Guy 28 Nov, 2021
Quoting: elmapuli dont think google will do anything that help their competitors too much , unlike valve who depend on our help to survive and grow this market, google is big enough to try to enter the gaming market with their own money, without much help from volunteers in an "winner takes it all" model.
In theory, anyhow. In practice they might try, but they're too cheap to back their play hard enough to win.

But yeah, they could still imagine doing it and treat people as competitors even though in the real world they will never seriously compete with them . . .


Last edited by Purple Library Guy on 28 November 2021 at 7:02 am UTC
elmapul 28 Nov, 2021
Quoting: Purple Library GuyIn theory, anyhow. In practice they might try, but they're too cheap to back their play hard enough to win.

But yeah, they could still imagine doing it and treat people as competitors even though in the real world they will never seriously compete with them . . .


i think their main issue is geting stake holders onboard.
i mean, they may want to continue trying something, but the stake holders who truly own the money pull the plug to early without thinking about long term consequences and they are forced to axe their projects.

stadia was not just an way for then to enter the gaming market, but to make chromeOS relevant in the operating system market too, who would purchase an expensive gaming rig running windows, when they could just pick the cheapest chromeOS run stadia on it and do the same thing?

if microsoft decided that for any reason xcloud would not support chromeOS, or if amazon or other player did that, chromeOS gamers would be screwed, google wanted to secure both sides but their stake holders didnt wanted to lose money for years until google figure out how to turn stadia into a profitable business.

it helps nothing that any prediction that google made about the initial reception of stadia was... wrong, and they failed to deliver many features for so much time that people dont know they exist even now that they are avaliable.

now, they show one prediction for stake holders and the reality is nothing like it, then they try to predict again after making some moves to increase it popularity and fail to predict again and again the result, who gonna trust then?

on the other hand, if they sucessfully raise stadia marketshare when their founders are the only ones left believing in it... they take all the profit...
i'm not saying that they are hidding an trump card to use like this, its just that... if they did one move right, the fate of the platform may quickly change from "no one want to fund it" to "everyone want"


now... can they change the perception that gamers have about stadia? i dont think so, i was willing to belive and wanted to see it happens (not because i like cloud or stadia but because i was desperate to see linux grow or at least became more viable for gaming) but now i dont believe they can change it anymore (anything they do may be too litle too later and it dont seems they are trying) nor i do care anymore.
mirv 28 Nov, 2021
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Quoting: Mohandevir
Quoting: mirvWhat I was more referring to was that the Deck won't replace anyone already using a laptop, or a desktop
Replace? No. Runnning alongside. Sure. Remember that the initial batch is for users who already have a valid Steam account, thus already have a gaming rig? 95% of the market is running Windows. Some of them might be tempted to use Linux (SteamOS) if the Steam Deck experience is great.

Quoting: mirv... but I don't see it driving GNU/Linux adoption...
Remember that there is already an uptick in Linux usage since Valve announced the Steam Deck? Look at the latest Steam hardware survey and the Steam Deck is not even released, yet.

Well, we'll see. It might convince some users to use the Deck in desktop mode for a bit of fun, but again they're more likely the people to already be contemplating trying out different things. And they might also be the people who install Windows on the hardware.

As for the uptick, that's also easily explained by a combination of reviewers and news getting people to fire up Steam who haven't done so in a while, not to mention that Valve could be tweaking to get more GNU/Linux numbers out of it.

What do you think Valve might end up doing if the Deck _isn't_ a resounding success? As popular as it might currently seem, the numbers right now aren't enough to keep it going. I'm sure numbers will increase if & when production and distribution issues are sorted, but it's a fun discussion point.
Anza 28 Nov, 2021
Quoting: F.UltraThe fork done by the FreeBSD team (libressl) was done because the FreeBSD devs wanted more control over such a central piece of software that had gotten stale. Due note that the funding that happened due to this went to OpenSSL and not to LibreSSL and while LibreSSL was the better library for a short while, the OpenSSL project got rejuvenated in the process and LibreSSL is now basically only used by FreeBSD and the distros and projects that went with LibreSSL are close to all back to using OpenSSL again.

It was actually done by OpenBSD folks, though porting it to FreeBSD might have been faster than to Linux. After all FreeBSD and OpenBSD share same 386BSD ancestry. Linux is it's own thing and thus is not by default compatible with things developed on other operating systems. Same thing applies on other direction too.

LibreSSL threw away lot of legacy things in order to improve security. So the goal wasn't just add features on top of OpenSSL. Which might explain why supporting LibreSSL hasn't been always that easy. Which might explain why supporting LibreSSL as OpenSSL replacement might have not been worthwhile once OpenSSL started to be good enough again.

Not that forking hasn't stopped to LibreSSL. Both Tink(Google) and S2N(Amazon) seem to roughly follow same ideals. I noticed that both share same license with OpenSSL, Apache 2.0. So they are able to share code if necessary. LibreSSL seems to be stuck with the older OpenSSL license.
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