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Capcom shows off official video of Devil May Cry 5 on the Steam Deck

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As more developers get their hands on a Steam Deck devkit, we're seeing plenty more show their games and now Capcom has taken a turn with Devil May Cry 5.

Unlike a lot of what we've seen previously via small clips or plain pictures on Twitter, Capcom went a tiny step further by making a video on their official Capcom USA YouTube Channel - that's quite a bit of extra advertisement power there for the Steam Deck.

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The video description notes the gameplay is being presented by the Lead Game Designer.

That looks like it runs very nicely too, very smooth action. Not totally unexpected though, since Devil May Cry 5 has worked well with Steam Play Proton for quite a while now. Since the Steam Deck resolution is only 1280 x 800px, most games should hopefully scale down quite well for it.

In case you missed it: Proton 6.3-8 was recently released. With more games working, DLSS for DirectX 11 and 12, CEG DRM support and more.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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Kimyrielle 28 Nov, 2021
Deck might or might not boost Linux adoption on the desktop. It's anyone's guess. But what Deck already DID was giving Valve a reason to throw substantial funds at a piece of software allowing us to run (almost) every Windows game on Linux.
At this point I am not even fussed about how many native ports we're getting. I don't care, as long as the games I want to play on Linux do run on Linux. And with exactly one notable exception, they do. Even if our market share never grows beyond 2%, we've already won. MS no longer has a stranglehold on gaming, because we're no longer forced to rely on devs to take pity on us and actually release a port of their games. We can run most of them without even asking them. And THAT's what Deck gave us.
Mohandevir 28 Nov, 2021
Because what it tells me it's that if, at some point, it's possible to play all games on the Steam Deck (meaning third party launchers too) as simple as click install (no matter how it's done), we might see the Steam Deck eating into the Steam desktop market share, no matter the OS. In the long term, the Steam Deck might just replace a portion of the desktops that will have started to collect dust... Would it be bad?

Obviously it's only applicable for those that use their PCs exclusively for gaming and are interrested in the Steam Deck.

By the way, I dislike doing anything on my cell phone too, but sometimes, it's at arms reach and easier to pick up, just like the Steam Deck will probably be (only the arms reach and easier to pick up parts, I mean).


Last edited by Mohandevir on 28 November 2021 at 9:18 pm UTC
Anza 28 Nov, 2021
Quoting: F.UltraWhich is why I hate when people like LTT make claims like "if GitHub is only for developers then that means that Linux is only for developers" when the whole frakking reason we don't have hardware support for his GoXLR in Linux is due to the shady practises of Microsoft. Its a hill that we have to climb up, but the thing is that the hill is artificially created and keep on getting steeper and steeper as we climb it.

To add insult into injury, Github is owned by Microsoft. Github sure does have some usability problems, it doesn't matter if you're developer or not. Linus is just taking the mentality that he doesn't want to be developer bit too seriously.

Github just happens to be the place where the projects start. Some projects don't even bother with packaging and let distributions handle that.

I guess the difference is that with Windows, projects that don't have any kind of infrastructure yet, get way less attention. It used to be bit complicated to set up free development environment for Windows. With Linux all you need sometimes is just GCC and text editor, possibly Make on top of that.

As for GoXLR, somebody with Windows can be valuable. I think one of the first things to do with when creating new USB driver is to snoop the traffic between the Windows and the device. I have no idea how easy it is to just record the traffic and replay it on Linux without creating a driver first.

Optimally there would be official driver, but I would assume getting it accepted into kernel might take few rounds of reviews as it might take a while get used to the conventions.
mirv 28 Nov, 2021
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Quoting: KimyrielleDeck might or might not boost Linux adoption on the desktop. It's anyone's guess. But what Deck already DID was giving Valve a reason to throw substantial funds at a piece of software allowing us to run (almost) every Windows game on Linux.
At this point I am not even fussed about how many native ports we're getting. I don't care, as long as the games I want to play on Linux do run on Linux. And with exactly one notable exception, they do. Even if our market share never grows beyond 2%, we've already won. MS no longer has a stranglehold on gaming, because we're no longer forced to rely on devs to take pity on us and actually release a port of their games. We can run most of them without even asking them. And THAT's what Deck gave us.

This is something that concerns me because in my view: there's been no winning, the games are all still developed with Windows in mind. It's always catchup to whatever Microsoft dictate, always some hack or workaround to make it function - and Microsoft can introduce something on a whim that new gaming might have to rely on that in turn makes it very difficult, or impossible, to work on GNU/Linux.
That Microsoft haven't done any of this yet, or tried legal maneuverings, is probably because it just hasn't been worth the effort. And why bother - they have complete dominance of all aspects of gaming, including which API to use. Valve is even convincing developers to stick with Windows in this manner.
Sure it helps run older titles, helps some current titles, but it's not good news for the future of gaming on GNU/Linux.
F.Ultra 28 Nov, 2021
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Quoting: Anza
Quoting: F.UltraWhich is why I hate when people like LTT make claims like "if GitHub is only for developers then that means that Linux is only for developers" when the whole frakking reason we don't have hardware support for his GoXLR in Linux is due to the shady practises of Microsoft. Its a hill that we have to climb up, but the thing is that the hill is artificially created and keep on getting steeper and steeper as we climb it.

To add insult into injury, Github is owned by Microsoft. Github sure does have some usability problems, it doesn't matter if you're developer or not. Linus is just taking the mentality that he doesn't want to be developer bit too seriously.

Github just happens to be the place where the projects start. Some projects don't even bother with packaging and let distributions handle that.

I guess the difference is that with Windows, projects that don't have any kind of infrastructure yet, get way less attention. It used to be bit complicated to set up free development environment for Windows. With Linux all you need sometimes is just GCC and text editor, possibly Make on top of that.

As for GoXLR, somebody with Windows can be valuable. I think one of the first things to do with when creating new USB driver is to snoop the traffic between the Windows and the device. I have no idea how easy it is to just record the traffic and replay it on Linux without creating a driver first.

Optimally there would be official driver, but I would assume getting it accepted into kernel might take few rounds of reviews as it might take a while get used to the conventions.

Capturing the USB traffic is easy enough without a driver but you must also correctly interpret it and there is nothing that prevents a vendor from communicating with a device over an encrypted channel (not that I think that GoXLR does but it's a possibility). And for GoXLR in particular they handle everything in the application, the device doesn't even have memory to store the configuration between resets so you have to also rewrite their entire application. The exe alone is 16MB and then there is a 4MB driver as well (just tested it in a W10 instance in Virtual Box).
Purple Library Guy 28 Nov, 2021
Quoting: F.UltraLinux desktop adoption is simply a long long process, if lucky we will some day reach macOS numbers but we will never reach Microsoft levels. That war was lost before Linux even existed when MS made sure with their shady business tactics that they got a large enough monopoly that PC equals Windows in everybody's mind.
You'd think that. But in some ways Microsoft has been too successful. When my wife got a Chromebook, and I was helping her figure out how to use it, it became apparent that she did not in fact really know what Windows was. She also didn't understand the distinction between a web browser and an operating system, or indeed between software and the OS in general. So the idea that the difference between her new dinky cheap laptop and her computer at work had a lot to do with the difference between a thing called Windows and a thing called ChromeOS, just didn't immediately have a meaning to her at all.
There are a lot of people out there like my wife. If some big computer manufacturer starts selling their computers with Linux on, an awful lot of people won't really get that there's a difference.
Purple Library Guy 28 Nov, 2021
Quoting: tuubiBut my phone I only use when I absolutely need to. It simply feels silly to try to do anything productive on a tiny touch screen when I've got more powerful hardware with better input methods and larger screens at hand. A smartphone has its advantages, mainly to do with it being small and easy to carry around with you, but it's never my first choice for getting something done or entertaining myself.
I don't actually own a cell phone.
But if I had one, my main stumbling block when it comes to using it for computer stuff would be, real keyboard. My main thing is word processing, walls of text on GamingOnLinux and the occasional spreadsheet. I want to type on a keyboard for that kind of stuff. I've typed texts on cell phones; my wife'll be doing something and says "Could you answer that, I want to tell her XYZ". It's painful.
(Maybe you wouldn't know the difference if you never learned to touch type, which it amazes me never became standard school curriculum. It just takes a term and you're set for life--I got a C-, but the skill was acquired, might have been the most useful thing I learned in high school)


Last edited by Purple Library Guy on 28 November 2021 at 11:03 pm UTC
F.Ultra 29 Nov, 2021
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Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: F.UltraLinux desktop adoption is simply a long long process, if lucky we will some day reach macOS numbers but we will never reach Microsoft levels. That war was lost before Linux even existed when MS made sure with their shady business tactics that they got a large enough monopoly that PC equals Windows in everybody's mind.
You'd think that. But in some ways Microsoft has been too successful. When my wife got a Chromebook, and I was helping her figure out how to use it, it became apparent that she did not in fact really know what Windows was. She also didn't understand the distinction between a web browser and an operating system, or indeed between software and the OS in general. So the idea that the difference between her new dinky cheap laptop and her computer at work had a lot to do with the difference between a thing called Windows and a thing called ChromeOS, just didn't immediately have a meaning to her at all.
There are a lot of people out there like my wife. If some big computer manufacturer starts selling their computers with Linux on, an awful lot of people won't really get that there's a difference.

Well here's to hoping. Wish I was a billionaire so that I could invest tons of money into creating the perfect Linux computer that was as slick as a Chromebook and have it been sold in normal stores. We need a new Canonical anno 2004 to pour resources into moving Linux closer to the customers.
CatKiller 29 Nov, 2021
Quoting: F.UltraWell here's to hoping. Wish I was a billionaire so that I could invest tons of money into creating the perfect Linux computer that was as slick as a Chromebook and have it been sold in normal stores. We need a new Canonical anno 2004 to pour resources into moving Linux closer to the customers.
It would need to be someone bigger than Canonical was. They did pour resources into a slick Linux device, worked out software packaging and distribution, took cues from Android about how to avoid the cruft of X11, developed an interface paradigm for convergence with the desktop... and then ran out of money, had to fire a bunch of people, and had to give up. So like Canonical, but with sufficient resources to be able to survive, say, 5 years more burn.
Purple Library Guy 29 Nov, 2021
Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: F.UltraWell here's to hoping. Wish I was a billionaire so that I could invest tons of money into creating the perfect Linux computer that was as slick as a Chromebook and have it been sold in normal stores. We need a new Canonical anno 2004 to pour resources into moving Linux closer to the customers.
It would need to be someone bigger than Canonical was. They did pour resources into a slick Linux device, worked out software packaging and distribution, took cues from Android about how to avoid the cruft of X11, developed an interface paradigm for convergence with the desktop... and then ran out of money, had to fire a bunch of people, and had to give up. So like Canonical, but with sufficient resources to be able to survive, say, 5 years more burn.
Maybe if Elon Musk decided open source was cool.


Last edited by Purple Library Guy on 29 November 2021 at 5:06 pm UTC
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