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Capcom shows off official video of Devil May Cry 5 on the Steam Deck

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As more developers get their hands on a Steam Deck devkit, we're seeing plenty more show their games and now Capcom has taken a turn with Devil May Cry 5.

Unlike a lot of what we've seen previously via small clips or plain pictures on Twitter, Capcom went a tiny step further by making a video on their official Capcom USA YouTube Channel - that's quite a bit of extra advertisement power there for the Steam Deck.

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The video description notes the gameplay is being presented by the Lead Game Designer.

That looks like it runs very nicely too, very smooth action. Not totally unexpected though, since Devil May Cry 5 has worked well with Steam Play Proton for quite a while now. Since the Steam Deck resolution is only 1280 x 800px, most games should hopefully scale down quite well for it.

In case you missed it: Proton 6.3-8 was recently released. With more games working, DLSS for DirectX 11 and 12, CEG DRM support and more.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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F.Ultra 29 Nov, 2021
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Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: F.UltraWell here's to hoping. Wish I was a billionaire so that I could invest tons of money into creating the perfect Linux computer that was as slick as a Chromebook and have it been sold in normal stores. We need a new Canonical anno 2004 to pour resources into moving Linux closer to the customers.
It would need to be someone bigger than Canonical was. They did pour resources into a slick Linux device, worked out software packaging and distribution, took cues from Android about how to avoid the cruft of X11, developed an interface paradigm for convergence with the desktop... and then ran out of money, had to fire a bunch of people, and had to give up. So like Canonical, but with sufficient resources to be able to survive, say, 5 years more burn.

This, turns out that $575M only takes you so far (and I don't think he poured all his money into Canonical either). Meanwhile lots of billionaires like Musk and Bezos reap benefits from Linux, they could invest $1bn each and their wallets would not even loose any weight.
slaapliedje 2 Dec, 2021
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Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Nocifer
Quoting: mirvto Capcom this isn't GNU/Linux, this is something closer to Just Another Console(tm).

And that's more than fine for the time being. Every journey begins with a first step, does it not? At this point all we really want and all we can really ask for is that games can run in an easy and competitive (performance-wise) manner on Linux, so that PC users aren't forced to use Windows if they want to also play games; and the Steam Deck's success will facilitate that. If and when this success becomes a reality, then we can start asking for more.

Sames arguments were made for Stadia too.

The Deck might differ if people are convinced to use the desktop mode, but phones have had exactly that and it's changed nothing. There's just no incentive that I can see.
Purely guesswork on all our parts of course, but I'm going with it won't change anything on the desktop.
How will this not change anything on the desktop? Will it bring more users to use Desktop Linux? Probably not. Will it bring more games that are playable on Desktop Linux? 100% it will, as it's using the exact same software on the Deck. That's where Stadia was garbage, it's all hidden on Google's servers, never to be seen by us 'normies'.
Google in general seem to be very good at making use of Linux in ways that you would think would be good for Linux more generally, but managing to avoid letting that happen. I don't know if they have some reason to want to do that or if it's just by accident, but so far they've been pretty consistent about it.
Proof is in the fact that they have a Google Linux (Android), that is incompatible with normal Lunix distributions. Then people complained, so they created yet another Google Linux (ChromeOS) that qlso is incompatible with normal Linux distributions. They added some stuff to run normal apps, but it is still a closed system. Google has basically become experts at taking Linux and closing it off for their own purposes.
Purple Library Guy 2 Dec, 2021
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Nocifer
Quoting: mirvto Capcom this isn't GNU/Linux, this is something closer to Just Another Console(tm).

And that's more than fine for the time being. Every journey begins with a first step, does it not? At this point all we really want and all we can really ask for is that games can run in an easy and competitive (performance-wise) manner on Linux, so that PC users aren't forced to use Windows if they want to also play games; and the Steam Deck's success will facilitate that. If and when this success becomes a reality, then we can start asking for more.

Sames arguments were made for Stadia too.

The Deck might differ if people are convinced to use the desktop mode, but phones have had exactly that and it's changed nothing. There's just no incentive that I can see.
Purely guesswork on all our parts of course, but I'm going with it won't change anything on the desktop.
How will this not change anything on the desktop? Will it bring more users to use Desktop Linux? Probably not. Will it bring more games that are playable on Desktop Linux? 100% it will, as it's using the exact same software on the Deck. That's where Stadia was garbage, it's all hidden on Google's servers, never to be seen by us 'normies'.
Google in general seem to be very good at making use of Linux in ways that you would think would be good for Linux more generally, but managing to avoid letting that happen. I don't know if they have some reason to want to do that or if it's just by accident, but so far they've been pretty consistent about it.
Proof is in the fact that they have a Google Linux (Android), that is incompatible with normal Lunix distributions. Then people complained, so they created yet another Google Linux (ChromeOS) that qlso is incompatible with normal Linux distributions. They added some stuff to run normal apps, but it is still a closed system. Google has basically become experts at taking Linux and closing it off for their own purposes.
Ayup.
tuubi 3 Dec, 2021
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Quoting: Eike
Quoting: Purple Library GuyAyup.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ayup
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/hey_up

You were on the right track, but then took a wrong turn. ;)

The first link tells you it's also an alternative spelling of ayuh.
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