Collabora's work on a Wayland driver for Wine is coming along nicely

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To end the year the open source consulting firm Collabora, who often works with Valve, has written up a fresh post with a video to show off their Wayland driver for Wine. Something they announced originally back in 2020, they've really put a lot of work into this one.

Reaching a stage where a huge amount of things now sound like they're working including window handling, OpenGL and Vulkan (with support for WineD3D and DXVK), multiple monitor support, HiDPI scaling and the list goes on. It's coming together nicely. It's not quite ready for upstreaming yet, and they have some issues still to be solved for things like cross-process rendering (Chromium/CEF based applications, like game stores).

Check out their video:

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More info in the full announcement.

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Lofty 23 Dec, 2021
Quoting: kon14
Quoting: LoftyBut i have found a way to fix this or rather, there is some light at the end of the tunnel. I installed gnome 3.36 (latest that mint/ubuntu will goto) as an experiment and ran wayland (again not the latest version)

Not the latest version is a huge understatement. Gnome 3.36 was like 3 major *tunnels* ago and then some.

And you're even using that with Nvidia, no less? Just upgrade your distro and move away from LTS, you'll get (almost) the latest and greatest from Gnome while also being able to actually use the nvidia drivers and play games.

edit: Ubuntu 21.10 and derivatives are also lagging behind and using Gnome 40 which is still not ideal, but usable on Nvidia. 41.2 and upwards adds Nvidia GBM support.

I have a machine on (the best) Arch distro but for my main rig i run mint. Partially because my internet is really shitty and updating two arch machines regularly would have me in never ending updates.. i already got to deal with steam updates, proton updates, shader cache, flatpak updates, et all the other regular small mint updates etc.. lol

But yes, i have a USB pen ready to go as it is inevitable that Mint/Ubuntu are still just way too far behind when it comes to anything but the most standard of setups.

The only question is: EndevourOS or Fedora ...
kon14 23 Dec, 2021
Quoting: LoftyThe only question is: EndevourOS or Fedora ...

I guess that depends on your priorities and your desktop preferences.

If you already enjoy Arch based distros and wanna try out any of its customized desktop spins, EndeavourOS might be a good fit.

If you want the best Gnome + Wayland + PipeWire experience and wish to try out something different, give Fedora a shot.

Then again, Debian/Ubuntu based distros are also okay. As long as you're at the very least not using LTS on a desktop and expecting to use any fancy features ootb at the same time.
Lofty 23 Dec, 2021
Quoting: kon14
Quoting: LoftyThe only question is: EndevourOS or Fedora ...

I guess that depends on your priorities and your desktop preferences.

If you already enjoy Arch based distros and wanna try out any of its customized desktop spins, EndeavourOS might be a good fit.

If you want the best Gnome + Wayland + PipeWire experience and wish to try out something different, give Fedora a shot.

Then again, Debian/Ubuntu based distros are also okay. As long as you're at the very least not using LTS on a desktop and expecting to use any fancy features ootb at the same time.

How is arch+gnome fundamentally behind or not as good i.e not the 'best' gnome experience compared to fedora ? i mean, im used to being quite far behind in big updates, a week or two isnt a big deal given that most my software is now as upto date on mint using flatpak as arch linux and security updates are pushed at around the same speed.
kon14 24 Dec, 2021
Quoting: LoftyHow is arch+gnome fundamentally behind or not as good i.e not the 'best' gnome experience compared to fedora ? i mean, im used to being quite far behind in big updates, a week or two isnt a big deal given that most my software is now as upto date on mint using flatpak as arch linux and security updates are pushed at around the same speed.

Considering pure Arch doesn't really come with a Gnome spin, despite offering a gnome metapackage, it's mostly about what you configure it to be. So I wouldn't say they're really comparable.
Arch based distros offering Gnome spins are another deal.

Fedora offers a solid and up to date stock Gnome base on a non-rolling release distro, while also putting a lot of effort into modernizing the entire desktop stack with Wayland, PipeWire and Flatpak.
Plus a lot of people contributing to Gnome are actually RedHat devs who happen to use Fedora and vice versa, so they're really tightly related.

On the contrary, if you're a KDE fan that's not particularly into tinkering just for the sake of it, I see little reason for you to install Fedora as its original configuration for it is plain awful.

Just like with anything on Linex, you can always set up everything yourself as long you have access to recent package versions from a rolling distro's repos, through external repos or even building them yourself, but that comes with its own maintenance cost.

If you're looking for something a bit more out of the ordinary, you could try Fedora Silverblue instead. It's an official immutable base Fedora spin built around containers, Flatpaks and OSTree.
It offers git-like support for multiple deployments, rollbacks, rebasing to other images (eg Kinoite, that's KDE).
Bricking your system is nearly impossible as you can always rollback whenever something doesn't work out as expected.
It does come with a bit of a learning curve for anyone interested in extensive system level tinkering, but it's still configurable despite its immutable nature.
Lofty 24 Dec, 2021
Quoting: kon14
Quoting: LoftyHow is arch+gnome fundamentally behind or not as good i.e not the 'best' gnome experience compared to fedora ? i mean, im used to being quite far behind in big updates, a week or two isnt a big deal given that most my software is now as upto date on mint using flatpak as arch linux and security updates are pushed at around the same speed.

Considering pure Arch doesn't really come with a Gnome spin, despite offering a gnome metapackage, it's mostly about what you configure it to be. So I wouldn't say they're really comparable.
Arch based distros offering Gnome spins are another deal.

Fedora offers a solid and up to date stock Gnome base on a non-rolling release distro, while also putting a lot of effort into modernizing the entire desktop stack with Wayland, PipeWire and Flatpak.
Plus a lot of people contributing to Gnome are actually RedHat devs who happen to use Fedora and vice versa, so they're really tightly related.

On the contrary, if you're a KDE fan that's not particularly into tinkering just for the sake of it, I see little reason for you to install Fedora as its original configuration for it is plain awful.

Just like with anything on Linex, you can always set up everything yourself as long you have access to recent package versions from a rolling distro's repos, through external repos or even building them yourself, but that comes with its own maintenance cost.

If you're looking for something a bit more out of the ordinary, you could try Fedora Silverblue instead. It's an official immutable base Fedora spin built around containers, Flatpaks and OSTree.
It offers git-like support for multiple deployments, rollbacks, rebasing to other images (eg Kinoite, that's KDE).
Bricking your system is nearly impossible as you can always rollback whenever something doesn't work out as expected.
It does come with a bit of a learning curve for anyone interested in extensive system level tinkering, but it's still configurable despite its immutable nature.

Good info thanks.
TheRiddick 24 Dec, 2021
Quoting: LoftyNvidia binary driver user here..
I had assumed good real world multi-monitor would work ok by now on x-server and i was wrong. Here with my dual screen mixed refresh/resolution combo

Might be a nvidia driver issue; I have a AMD 6800xt
anastiel 24 Dec, 2021
big news!
seydoyutre 24 Dec, 2021
Quoting: LoftyI had assumed good real world multi-monitor would work ok by now on x-server and i was wrong. Here with my dual screen mixed refresh/resolution combo. Windows will draw at the lowest refresh available instead of refreshing separately for each screen...

adding the following to /etc/environment solved this for me.

 
CLUTTER_DEFAULT_FPS=144
__GL_SYNC_DISPLAY_DEVICE=DP-0
Lofty 27 Dec, 2021
Quoting: seydoyutre
Quoting: LoftyI had assumed good real world multi-monitor would work ok by now on x-server and i was wrong. Here with my dual screen mixed refresh/resolution combo. Windows will draw at the lowest refresh available instead of refreshing separately for each screen...

adding the following to /etc/environment solved this for me.

 
CLUTTER_DEFAULT_FPS=144
__GL_SYNC_DISPLAY_DEVICE=DP-0

Are you running Gsync in order for this to happen ? Im also on cinnamon, so im not sure how this will affect things vs lets say Gnome. Having said there are some key things missing on cinnamon with multi-monitor, it's not perfect by any means.

(Mint does not have that specific folder btw)
seydoyutre 28 Dec, 2021
Quoting: Lofty
Quoting: seydoyutre
Quoting: LoftyI had assumed good real world multi-monitor would work ok by now on x-server and i was wrong. Here with my dual screen mixed refresh/resolution combo. Windows will draw at the lowest refresh available instead of refreshing separately for each screen...

adding the following to /etc/environment solved this for me.

 
CLUTTER_DEFAULT_FPS=144
__GL_SYNC_DISPLAY_DEVICE=DP-0

Are you running Gsync in order for this to happen ? Im also on cinnamon, so im not sure how this will affect things vs lets say Gnome. Having said there are some key things missing on cinnamon with multi-monitor, it's not perfect by any means.

(Mint does not have that specific folder btw)

/etc/environment is a text file you must create it,
change 144 to the refresh rate of your fastest monitor and change DP-0 to suit with your setup. you can find the port-id in nvidia settings (install "nvidia-settings" package if you don't have)

if that doesn't solve the problem: open nvidia settings, goto "X Server XVideo Settings" category and change "Sync to this display device". select the monitor with the highest refresh rate. next goto "X Server Display Configuration" category and for each screen go Advanced>Force Full Composition Pipeline
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