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While there's a huge focus on Flatpak and Flathub thanks to the Steam Deck shipping with it out of the box, Canonical on the other hand continue with their own Snap packaging and they have a Steam Snap in testing for Ubuntu (and other distros, since Snap also works elsewhere).

In a fresh introduction post on the Ubuntu Linux Discourse forum (thanks OMGUbuntu), it outlines how they're now actually "going all in on the gaming experience on Ubuntu and we’ve started building out a team dedicated to working on just that". Part of that is reducing the need for PPAs and other solutions, and their focus now is on Steam.

The call for testing has now begun on their Steam Snap package which gives you everything you need for Native Linux gaming and for Proton too. It's early days for the Steam Snap so expect issues but they said they will "iterate quickly, and respond to this feedback" on it.

On top of that we can expect more gaming on Ubuntu Linux improvements to come "such as providing easy ways to get more bleeding edge components like Mesa drivers, and even newer kernels and proprietary drivers" — that all sounds great to me.

It's not actually live yet but once it will be, I'll update the post here with instructions they give, which they will also post in the link above. Update: Canonical has now done an additional blog post, going over the instructions. Either install it from the website / Snap Store or via terminal: snap install steam --beta

With the blog post, Canonical once again reiterated their plan to improve Ubuntu gaming mentioning that "the Ubuntu Desktop team is getting down to work planning for the future, and improving the gaming experience features heavily in our priorities (and hiring plan!)". They go on to mention how "serious gamers" continue using Windows primarily, which we all know as Steam puts Linux at about 1% currently (see our Steam Tracker) but they hope by "improving the gaming experience, and the Steam experience in particular, we can ensure that Ubuntu can become a genuine daily driver for gamers".

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Meta, Steam, Ubuntu
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Quoting: scaineAnd they didn't get that way by being divisive.
Nope, they got that way by making a better Debian release. Which then became a fork and they did their own thing, that then irritates people as it breaks some compatibility. But that has been the history of Debian. Someone makes a distro based on it, it starts out great, but because they get separate repositories, and try their hardest to keep in sync, but then eventually they can't keep the customizations up, and they die because it becomes too much effort for the developers.

Ubuntu has only survived this long because of Mark Shuttleworth having money.

It still isn't 'the' Linux distro, as there is no such thing. A lot of people don't even recommend it anymore. I now recommend Pop_OS! Or if they want to give me the time to set it up for them, I recommend Debian Stable.
tamodolo 28 Jun
Quoting: TheSHEEEP
Quoting: tamodoloFedora 36 is the first Linux release that actually solves input delay to be on pair with windows. They did this unintentionaly as it was an issue related to touchpads. I am extremely happy by this fix as FINALY FINALY Linux is starting to move forward instead of just doing sidesteps and go anywhere.
Sounds more like a bug to me that you had there.
I've been gaming on Linux since years, including very fast-paced games (FPS) on both Ubuntu- & Arch-based distros and I've yet to notice any input lag (excluding lag that is caused by the CPU being overburdened).

I'm very sensitive to inputlag because my main system to play games is windows and DS4 have very little inputlag on it. When testing it on any Linux de first thing evident is that DS4 isn't as responsive. Fedora 36 bring parity to that.

Also, everytime I post about this problem I receave a lot of comments that nobudy have this problem or it's a bug in my side. I see this as the big problem Linux have because it needs someone big to make average user complams to reach devs. Otherwise it'll be ignored... This "fix" was a side effect, but the merit is still there.
tamodolo 28 Jun
Quoting: fagnerln
Quoting: tamodoloFedora 36 is the first Linux release that actually solves input delay to be on pair with windows. They did this unintentionaly as it was an issue related to touchpads. I am extremely happy by this fix as FINALY FINALY Linux is starting to move forward instead of just doing sidesteps and go anywhere.

I'm following this release and didn't read anything about this, looks like gnome improved the way that it handles input to be on par to the FPS and not to the refresh rate.

What fedora 36 have to make it different?

You need to search in the complete changelog. A friend pointed they did that after reading it and said probably it was it when I mentioned that DS4 was working on pair with windows now.
tamodolo 28 Jun
Quoting: fagnerln
Quoting: tamodoloFedora 36 is the first Linux release that actually solves input delay to be on pair with windows. They did this unintentionaly as it was an issue related to touchpads. I am extremely happy by this fix as FINALY FINALY Linux is starting to move forward instead of just doing sidesteps and go anywhere.

I'm following this release and didn't read anything about this, looks like gnome improved the way that it handles input to be on par to the FPS and not to the refresh rate.

What fedora 36 have to make it different?

It's a change on fedora's libinput. It isn't mentioned on keynotes.
slaapliedje 28 Jun
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Quoting: tamodolo
Quoting: fagnerln
Quoting: tamodoloFedora 36 is the first Linux release that actually solves input delay to be on pair with windows. They did this unintentionaly as it was an issue related to touchpads. I am extremely happy by this fix as FINALY FINALY Linux is starting to move forward instead of just doing sidesteps and go anywhere.

I'm following this release and didn't read anything about this, looks like gnome improved the way that it handles input to be on par to the FPS and not to the refresh rate.

What fedora 36 have to make it different?

You need to search in the complete changelog. A friend pointed they did that after reading it and said probably it was it when I mentioned that DS4 was working on pair with windows now.

Is this the key thing? "DS4 was working on pair with windows now"? So your problem was that the input lag existed when using a Dual Shock 4 controller? I think I've only used it once or twice on mine. I'm guessing this is without a wired connection?

Bluetooth is... still pretty shit on Linux. Though they have miraculously tweaked / fixed it on the Steam Deck.
tamodolo 12 Aug
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: tamodolo
Quoting: fagnerln
Quoting: tamodoloFedora 36 is the first Linux release that actually solves input delay to be on pair with windows. They did this unintentionaly as it was an issue related to touchpads. I am extremely happy by this fix as FINALY FINALY Linux is starting to move forward instead of just doing sidesteps and go anywhere.

I'm following this release and didn't read anything about this, looks like gnome improved the way that it handles input to be on par to the FPS and not to the refresh rate.

What fedora 36 have to make it different?

You need to search in the complete changelog. A friend pointed they did that after reading it and said probably it was it when I mentioned that DS4 was working on pair with windows now.

Is this the key thing? "DS4 was working on pair with windows now"? So your problem was that the input lag existed when using a Dual Shock 4 controller? I think I've only used it once or twice on mine. I'm guessing this is without a wired connection?

Bluetooth is... still pretty shit on Linux. Though they have miraculously tweaked / fixed it on the Steam Deck.

Yeah. Input lag and consistency with gamepads on Linux is very very bad. I'm waiting SteamOS 3 to be released for PC to test it.
slaapliedje 12 Aug
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Quoting: tamodolo
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: tamodolo
Quoting: fagnerln
Quoting: tamodoloFedora 36 is the first Linux release that actually solves input delay to be on pair with windows. They did this unintentionaly as it was an issue related to touchpads. I am extremely happy by this fix as FINALY FINALY Linux is starting to move forward instead of just doing sidesteps and go anywhere.

I'm following this release and didn't read anything about this, looks like gnome improved the way that it handles input to be on par to the FPS and not to the refresh rate.

What fedora 36 have to make it different?

You need to search in the complete changelog. A friend pointed they did that after reading it and said probably it was it when I mentioned that DS4 was working on pair with windows now.

Is this the key thing? "DS4 was working on pair with windows now"? So your problem was that the input lag existed when using a Dual Shock 4 controller? I think I've only used it once or twice on mine. I'm guessing this is without a wired connection?

Bluetooth is... still pretty shit on Linux. Though they have miraculously tweaked / fixed it on the Steam Deck.

Yeah. Input lag and consistency with gamepads on Linux is very very bad. I'm waiting SteamOS 3 to be released for PC to test it.
I actually haven't had a lot of issues with gamepads, but I tend to mostly use wired ones, with the exception of the Steam Controller.

BT audio is where I have issues.
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