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GOG attempt to bring customers back with a revival of Good Old Games

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GOG aren't having the best of times recently, with details about their financial troubles painting a bleak picture, although it seems they have something of a plan. Later they announced some changes, including a tweak to what they mean by DRM free.

Now? They're attempting to go back to their roots, at least little, to woo customers back to their store with a small revival of "Good Old Games", what they were originally known as. The start of this is the addition of a Good Old Games tag, which GOG say will "showcase over 500 games that our Team has deemed iconic classics".

This is one reason I liked GOG originally, their commitment to bringing back and supporting old games, but they lost their way somewhat when trying to become just another store. Hopefully they will be doing more as time goes on to revive old games. Plenty of older games nowadays can run on Linux just fine through all sorts of open source game engines, and having an easy and legal place to get them for the data files is great.

To go along with this announcement, today they released the classic FPS, The Wheel of Time. GOG say this was done in cooperation with Nightdive Studios and that the "efforts and in-house expertise of GOG’s Tech Team the game received modern OS compatibility and hi-resolution support". Although, by modern OS, they only mean Windows specifically.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: DRM-Free, GOG, Meta, Retro
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mirv 6 Apr
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Quoting: Sputnik_tr_02
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: damarrinIf they wanted to stay relevant with the Linux crowd. Which they don't.

Focusing on old games, as the name "good old games" suggests, you're absolutely correct. There's really no point: relatively few of those older games having native versions, with wine or dosbox taking care of the bulk of the titles. With software such as Lutris, there's really no reason for GOG to actually bother with GNU/Linux: the market share is too small, and everything needed for GNU/Linux users is basically already taken care of. For older games, of course (and I daresay for most newer titles too).
Ironically, I suspect it's easier to get the older games running on GNU/Linux thanks to wine and dosbox, than it is to provide interface libraries and have the games run on Windows.

Why bother with all of those?

Steam provides tools for both. Steam Linux Runtime for native and Proton for others. An they have first class Linux support, Regional pricing, alternative payment options and countless other features via their Native Linux Client. So there is no reason for me to bother with gog.

Turns out that my distro provides all of those tools for free, outside of a proprietary games management client, and integrated with the distro itself.
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Sputnik_tr_02
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: damarrinIf they wanted to stay relevant with the Linux crowd. Which they don't.

Focusing on old games, as the name "good old games" suggests, you're absolutely correct. There's really no point: relatively few of those older games having native versions, with wine or dosbox taking care of the bulk of the titles. With software such as Lutris, there's really no reason for GOG to actually bother with GNU/Linux: the market share is too small, and everything needed for GNU/Linux users is basically already taken care of. For older games, of course (and I daresay for most newer titles too).
Ironically, I suspect it's easier to get the older games running on GNU/Linux thanks to wine and dosbox, than it is to provide interface libraries and have the games run on Windows.

Why bother with all of those?

Steam provides tools for both. Steam Linux Runtime for native and Proton for others. An they have first class Linux support, Regional pricing, alternative payment options and countless other features via their Native Linux Client. So there is no reason for me to bother with gog.

Turns out that my distro provides all of those tools for free, outside of a proprietary games management client, and integrated with the distro itself.

Yea G.O.G Good old gatekeeping.
mirv 6 Apr
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Quoting: Sputnik_tr_02
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Sputnik_tr_02
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: damarrinIf they wanted to stay relevant with the Linux crowd. Which they don't.

Focusing on old games, as the name "good old games" suggests, you're absolutely correct. There's really no point: relatively few of those older games having native versions, with wine or dosbox taking care of the bulk of the titles. With software such as Lutris, there's really no reason for GOG to actually bother with GNU/Linux: the market share is too small, and everything needed for GNU/Linux users is basically already taken care of. For older games, of course (and I daresay for most newer titles too).
Ironically, I suspect it's easier to get the older games running on GNU/Linux thanks to wine and dosbox, than it is to provide interface libraries and have the games run on Windows.

Why bother with all of those?

Steam provides tools for both. Steam Linux Runtime for native and Proton for others. An they have first class Linux support, Regional pricing, alternative payment options and countless other features via their Native Linux Client. So there is no reason for me to bother with gog.

Turns out that my distro provides all of those tools for free, outside of a proprietary games management client, and integrated with the distro itself.

Yea G.O.G Good old gatekeeping.

Trolololololololololol.
Nocifer 6 Apr
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: damarrinIf they wanted to stay relevant with the Linux crowd. Which they don't.

Focusing on old games, as the name "good old games" suggests, you're absolutely correct. There's really no point: relatively few of those older games having native versions, with wine or dosbox taking care of the bulk of the titles. With software such as Lutris, there's really no reason for GOG to actually bother with GNU/Linux: the market share is too small, and everything needed for GNU/Linux users is basically already taken care of. For older games, of course (and I daresay for most newer titles too).
Ironically, I suspect it's easier to get the older games running on GNU/Linux thanks to wine and dosbox, than it is to provide interface libraries and have the games run on Windows.

That's not true, Galaxy is still needed for online functionality even if the games otherwise install and run fine on Linux. For example Gwent, their online card game, is absolutely playable on Linux; except it needs Galaxy running in the background which is a pain in the a$$.

If they really were the nice, pro DRM-free guys they're purporting to be (as opposed to the Linux-hating Windows shills they actually are; their new deal with Epic just about proves it in my eyes) they would at least have released a galaxy.so library for Linux users to use as they see fit. But nope. So **** them. And I say that as the owner of some 300 GoG games.
mirv 6 Apr
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Quoting: Nocifer
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: damarrinIf they wanted to stay relevant with the Linux crowd. Which they don't.

Focusing on old games, as the name "good old games" suggests, you're absolutely correct. There's really no point: relatively few of those older games having native versions, with wine or dosbox taking care of the bulk of the titles. With software such as Lutris, there's really no reason for GOG to actually bother with GNU/Linux: the market share is too small, and everything needed for GNU/Linux users is basically already taken care of. For older games, of course (and I daresay for most newer titles too).
Ironically, I suspect it's easier to get the older games running on GNU/Linux thanks to wine and dosbox, than it is to provide interface libraries and have the games run on Windows.

That's not true, Galaxy is still needed for online functionality even if the games otherwise install and run fine on Linux. For example Gwent, their online card game, is absolutely playable on Linux; except it needs Galaxy running in the background which is a pain in the a$$.

If they really were the nice, pro DRM-free guys they're purporting to be (as opposed to the Linux-hating Windows shills they actually are; their new deal with Epic just about proves it in my eyes) they would at least have released a galaxy.so library for Linux users to use as they see fit. But nope. So **** them. And I say that as the owner of some 300 GoG games.

I think you're confusing a few things. I mentioned old games for a reason - games unlikely to require 3rd part components.
You also seem to equate not supporting GNU/Linux with hating GNU/Linux, and I'm not sure how to put it if you can't understand the difference. It's not economically viable for them to invest in. Simple as that. While I'm not suggesting you actually are, your words do give off an impression of entitlement - and why would any company want to do unprofitable business with that kind of interaction? Again, I'm not suggesting at all that you are - but I am using your words as an example of public impression that GOG might have to deal with, and any negativity associated with even the slightest perceived failing, so there's really nothing in it for GOG.
Obviously though, for some 300 games, GOG have provided you with an acceptable service. That's why you paid money for them, and for the games you have for free....well you can't really complain about that.
I'm going to throw my hat into the ring here (for no good reason)...
I gravitated towards GOG due to both the DRM-Free attitude at the onset, as well as the initial focus on older games... games that were very difficult to obtain legally through other means. I have hundreds of titles from them, and, over all, I've feel generally content with my purchases (yes, I have purchased some new-ish indies along with the older games).

I am whole heartedly disappointed with GOG's outward, at best, indifference towards Linux. I'm very well aware that Linux is still a pretty damn niche OS for gamming and "isn't financially worth the effort to support", so, I'm usually not surprised when there exists no Linux support and am fine with having to tinker my purchases to life on my own (I'm a strange duck in that I kinda like the tinkering). GOG, however, does feel like they do have a sort of resentment towards Linux, especially given their original market was retro games that, I dare say, often work better and are easier to setup in Linux than in Windows.

I'm not against purchasing GOG titles, even now, but I do tend to stick with the really old games when I do purchase from them.

Honestly... if GOG is in financial straits, then right now might be the best time for them to start embracing Linux. If they were to get Galaxy to actually RUN on Linux, released it as a Flatpak, then they'd be on Steam Deck and they might even see an uptick in game sales! Hell, Steam's footing the bill for the hardware, all they need to do is a comparatively tiny bit of elbow grease on their software, and they'd be available for a bunch (hundreds of thousands, I'd wager) of users that'd be happy to buy games from them to use on the Deck. Hell... even if it cost them a million to get Galaxy running and installable on Steam, I'd be totally flabbergasted if they didn't make that up in sales.
chowder 6 Apr
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Wish someone would sell me James Bond 007: Nightfire and The Lord of the Rings: The Battle for Middle-earth II.


Last edited by chowder on 6 April 2022 at 6:23 pm UTC
braiam 6 Apr
[quote=Sputnik_tr_02]
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: damarrinIf they wanted to stay relevant with the Linux crowd. Which they don't.
Regional pricing,

Interesting, because GOG has regional pricing, Epic has regional pricing, but Steam does not. So, it benefits me to buy from GOG than Steam.
Ardje 6 Apr
After loki left the building, and no others were to take their place, GOG came and promised to relieve the biggest hurdle on playing licensed windows titles on linux: that fucking DRM that everyone hated.
As such I bought a lot on GOG.
Then Valve got a steam client that worked on linux.
And then they got games working on linux.
And then they threw everything they had on linux.
So yeah, Valve first, GOG next.
Valve is doing good, GOG is doing good. From the 2 Valve is doing better good than GOG.
But if the gog installers embedded in chimeraos lists more games on green (about all games I have on gog are not supported in the chimeraos GOG installer), I would start accidentally buying on GOG again.
Because throwing money on GOG is not bad. Throwing money on Valve however is currently better for the near future of gaming.
I actually have original linux games that I can't play anymore because the DRM requires me to mount the original CD (Shogo MAD ported by hyperion).
Both Valve and GOG prevent that from ever happening again.
The problem is the same as with the cyberpunk game - they kind of ruined their reputation over the last years.
- newer games that did not receive the same updates/dlc avaliable in other stores (this should never happen!)
- galaxy client exclusive features(multiplayer) and promotions while not offering a client for part of their customers
- making Linux feel users like third rate customers(no client, no native versions of games that have one in other stores) even though that is exactly the crowd that would have loudly sung their praises till kingdom come for a little support and the DRM free model alone.

Since only "old games" is a limited market and they can not reasonably compete with the Epic-giveaway-shop and Steam's features and vast catalogue, reputation and consumer friendliness could make them keep and expand their niche - but they would need to put in the extra effort.
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