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VITURE One XR glasses look fun paired up with a Steam Deck

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Perhaps an answer to "Deck Neck" where your neck starts to hurt staring down at the Steam Deck? I'm certainly curious to give the VITURE One XR glasses a go.

The VITURE One glasses enable you to connect them up to various devices, to act like a 120" virtual screen so you can be completely absorbed into what you're doing. For the Steam Deck specifically, what we're obviously interested in primarily here, the developers said:

With the increasing popularity of the Steam Deck, VITURE One will be huge for Steam Deck owners. The best part of Steam Deck is its portability. You can play it anywhere, anytime. But bending over a small screen for lengths of time is uncomfortable. Instead, connect your Steam Deck to VITURE One XR glasses to unlock a 120-inch virtual screen instead!

Together with Steam Deck, VITURE One will be a game changer in the gaming industry.

What you get according to their included specifications is a virtual 120" display at 1080p and 60FPS, with a "PPD (pixels per degree) of 55 - roughly the equivalent of 300-400 PPI on a physical screen(Retina Display)". They include speakers too, providing spatial sound and the glasses will brighten and dim as needed.

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There's a few extra features and add-on devices, some of which don't work with the Steam Deck. There's a lot more to it though, and a lot of devices supported — even cloud gaming. The nerd in me wants a pair.

You can check out the project on Kickstarter, and it's already funded with 15 days left.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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3 comments

Ehvis 10 May
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Something is weird with those numbers. A virtual 120" screen doesn't mean anything without a distance. However, it also says 55 pixels per degree, which comes out at a horizontal FOV of 34.9 degrees, which would put it at about 4.2 meters away. Good as a big screen TV, but a regular monitor would cover a much larger part of your field of view, which for my work monitor is about 55 degrees. So more like a console/TV experience than a gaming PC/monitor experience. It also means that the retina comparison is even more blabla than it was before since it's basically only compares due to distance.

Without knowing the picture quality or viewing comfort, it seems like a big 400 euro risk.
ObsidianBlk 10 May
I'm... dubious.
Just power-wise, out of the gate, the glasses do not come with a battery. For the Steam Deck, it looks as if can plug the glasses into the deck for power, but I suspect that would significantly eat into the Decks limited battery (I am not a battery usage expert, but screens are not usually energy sippers), reducing the Deck's mobility. Beyond that, they're already up-selling on not one but two battery packs. One in the neckband and the other is a strait up power bank. This really makes me feel like these glasses truly need far more power then they want you to think they do.

There's other things that make me nervous. Regarding the neckbar, it says...
QuoteRemoving the built-in battery and processors from the glasses and moving them to the neckband (where there's more space) is the best way to solve the over-weight and over-heating problem some other VR/XR devices have.
... so, what's this "processor" being talked about? The neckband is an add-on, not a standard component (check the pledge tiers. You can get the glasses only $399, but you need to spend at least $499 to include the neckband). If the neckband was purely a battery, then, sure, but I get the feeling you loose significant functionality without this neckband if the processes is in this otherwise add-on accessory.

Lastly, this is more a gut feeling, but, it's showing that, supposedly, these glasses can go fully transparent (like normal sunglasses) or be opaque, showing the actual "screen". This alone would be impressive, but it supports moving the display to at least one corner of your view. I don't know. I'm sure we have technology to do this to a degree, but I strongly doubt the tech to do this and keep the display system as thin (or nearly so) as a pair of standard glasses actually exists. Microsoft has been working on Hololens for years and that device is still quite bulky (from last I'd seen of it). If the display tech has become so good we can cram it all into a standard pair of sunglasses (or even glasses with neckband... but, remember, the neckband is only an add-on), I'd think Microsoft would be trumpeting this tech advancement to all who would listen.

That brings me to my final worry... The presentation. It's all quite slick looking, but what gets me is that the very first thing that's been focused on with this bit of kit is how they went to "one of the most prestigious design firms" to come up with the style for these glasses. Sure, few people what to have duct-tape and cardboard (<- Ha! Google) strapped to their face, but it feels telling that the very first thing the creators of this revolutionary new tech gadget wants to impress upon you is how good it looks. How well it functions comes later. Let's talk about how good it looks.

Look, I don't want to shiz on this product. Maybe it'll be the next big thing. In my opinion, though, what's being presented is such a leap from where I understand head-mounted display tech to be at present with some of the details of this being glossed over... and not to harp on it, but why is the processor in an add-on accessory?!

If this is legit, awesome! I don't think it is, though. We'll see.
helloCLD 10 May
This Kickstarter got shared on a game dev discord I'm on, and while it does look cool I'm a bit skeptical. The tech totally exists, but I think I've only seen videos/reviews coming from official VITURE channels, which is always big red flag.

Quoting: ObsidianBlkThat brings me to my final worry... The presentation. It's all quite slick looking, but what gets me is that the very first thing that's been focused on with this bit of kit is how they went to "one of the most prestigious design firms" to come up with the style for these glasses. Sure, few people what to have duct-tape and cardboard (<- Ha! Google) strapped to their face, but it feels telling that the very first thing the creators of this revolutionary new tech gadget wants to impress upon you is how good it looks. How well it functions comes later. Let's talk about how good it looks.

So much this. It screams early 90's VR, where there's a whole lot of effort and hype put towards saying how great it looks/feels/works, without a lot of data or ouside reviews to actually back it up.


Last edited by helloCLD on 10 May 2022 at 12:41 pm UTC
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