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Denuvo announced Denuvo SecureDLC to protect DLC

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Denuvo is not exactly something any gamer I've ever seen be happy about and now it's growing and will likely appear in more games, with the announcement of Denuvo SecureDLC.

Irdeto said in the press release it's "the first of its kind in the gaming market and provides opportunities to extend the revenue tail for developers and publishers past the initial launch window".

The main target here appears to be free to play games that offer up DLC and micro-transactions to unlock various features, cosmetics and so on with SecureDLC being positioned to protect against piracy there. So Irdeto are hoping that developers will pick SecureDLC to deal with it apparently becoming "easy to bypass the existing barriers that try to secure DLCs on popular gaming platforms like Steam and Epic" as they found "players can automatically generate and install programs that access downloadable content without paying for it".

According to Reinhard Blaukovitsch, Managing Director at Denuvo by Irdeto, the new technology is already being successfully used with the current Denuvo Anti-Tamper clients: “Denuvo has become a one-stop shop for game developers to ensure the safety of their game against cheating, tampering, and piracy and to protect the gaming experience. Our current clients, big and small, are ecstatic with the results and we are happy to help them maximize revenue and also enable new business models for these games they spent so much effort building.”

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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43 comments
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TrainDoc 4 Jul
Quoting: PublicNuisanceI refuse to buy games with Denuvo on principle even if they work with Linux. This will be no different.
0

Oh god I just thought how this might effect how far Proton and Wine have come with compatiblity... Fucking Denuovo...
Quoting: scaine
Quoting: AppelsinThat’s a common misconception
That's exactly what I meant by "fear of piracy". I think you're pointing out the difference between early release piracy and long-term piracy? I think?

But it's all piracy and there have been quite a few studies (or at least polls) like the one covered here, that show that the people who pirate games wouldn't (or can't) actually buy the game anyway, so it's all bullshit. Indeed that particular study suggests that piracy increases sales - an outcome unique to the gaming industry.

All DRM does is piss off paying customers and spread misery amongst the people who can't or won't buy the game anyway.
I wonder if at this point it's actually one of those insurance/legal things. Like, shareholders can sue you or otherwise give you a hard time if you didn't do everything possible to prevent loss of profits via piracy, DRM is theoretically a thing possible you could do to etc. etc., so your legal dept. says if you don't do the DRM (and incidentally employ more lawyers to oversee it) you might be open to troubles. As the guy said in Robocop, "Who cares if it works?"
Quoting: scaine
Quoting: mr-victory
Quoting: finaldestI am looking at you, Paradox
Does Paradox implement non-Steam DRM? Why are you looking at Paradox?

Because the Paradox business model is based entirely on DRM. If they implement this, and you resent Denuvo enough to avoid buying anything encumbered with it, then this will affect a LOT of DLC.

For example - Surviving Mars is £28, but its DLC is another £80. City Skylines is £23, but its DLC comes to a cool £160. Crusader Kings is free... but (brace yourself) has £220 of DLC available.

I actually don't mind the model - I like that they support their older games with constant expansions (unlike Ubisoft), and at the end of the day, you buy what appeals to you. But that's a lot of DLC to apply DRM to.
While the Paradox business model is certainly based on selling a bunch of DLC, as far as I'm aware they don't even have DRM on the base games, let alone the DLC, so I don't see how you can say their business model is based entirely on DRM. At least, I'm pretty sure I've played Stellaris off-line.

Anyway, aren't the DLC DeNuvo are talking about more like all the stuff people get for aesthetics or pay-to-win in free-to-play games? Seemed to me it was more like that, making sure you can't copy what you get from microtransactions. No doubt it would work for real DLC too, but I feel like that isn't really the focus.


Last edited by Purple Library Guy on 4 July 2022 at 11:36 pm UTC
Grogan 5 Jul
Great... nobody has to buy games. Assholes would do well to remember that.

I will not buy anything that uses Denuvo.
Some games with denuvo release with it poorly implemented to where it either causes problems or is completely ineffective because either they shipped the wrong executable or add an extra executable they weren't supposed to. So this only increases the chances that they mess something up adding new performance problems or vulnerabilities within their DRM scheme. So a game could potentially get denuvo, have problems, the problems get fixed, DLC releases with denuvo, game has the problems it did from launch all over again because denuvo was not implemented correctly a second time. That name though, SecureDLC, really sounds like SecuROM/SuckU-ROM.
MayeulC 5 Jul
Quoting: scaineI like that they support their older games with constant expansions (unlike Ubisoft)

That's appalling. Especially cutting off access to DLC. Instead, upon reaching EOL, I wish they made a combination of the following (easiest to do first):
* Altered the games to have them load DLCs offline
* Ripped uplay out of them
* Offered server binaries and custom server browsers
* Made everything p2p
* Released the Server-side source code
* Released client-side source code

At least they continue to sell them, they are not lost forever... until they stop working, that is.
Appelsin 5 Jul
Quoting: scaine
Quoting: AppelsinThat’s a common misconception
That's exactly what I meant by "fear of piracy". I think you're pointing out the difference between early release piracy and long-term piracy? I think?

But it's all piracy and there have been quite a few studies (or at least polls) like the one covered here, that show that the people who pirate games wouldn't (or can't) actually buy the game anyway, so it's all bullshit. Indeed that particular study suggests that piracy increases sales - an outcome unique to the gaming industry.

All DRM does is piss off paying customers and spread misery amongst the people who can't or won't buy the game anyway.

Ah, okay, when you wrote that they bought the snake oil, I took it as meaning that they believed all the shit from DRM companies that this would forever prevent priacy, which would net them several billions of billions of extra sales and money.
But yeah, my point was that the only piracy they actually "need" to quell is the first week or so, and that's why they include it, but even so they know that it doesn't actually do anything worthwhile. With the game easily available on PC storefronts, console storefronts, physical stores, the vast majority won't (or just arent technically skilled) to faff around with downloading from torrent sites, applying the cracks and workarounds for online features (if the get access to online at all).


Quoteindeed that particular study suggests that piracy increases sales - an outcome unique to the gaming industry.

Not unique, actually. Remember how the people who made the Game of Thrones TV-series said that piracy was actually a real boon for the series popularity? People who had no access to a streaming service showing it (which was many, due to all this license bullshit from ages past), would pirate it, and thus made it reach ever further, which in turn made it more popular/hyped, which further turned into people subscribing/paying to see it.


EDIT:
To be honest, I don't think it's even about piracy at all at this point. It's about having control over the games. When even singleplayer games have "always online requirements", you know that they just want to be able to pull the plug whenever they like. You don't buy the games, you lease them. They now have the means to reach into your computer and decide if you get to play the game you "bought" today, and they cream their pants just thinking about the power they now wield :)


Last edited by Appelsin on 5 July 2022 at 8:06 am UTC
Jahimself 5 Jul
It's a bit weird to advocate against piracy and annoy the honest customer, while only the pirated version is troublefree to use... Using denuvo is a schysophrenic behaviour that acts like a promotion for hacked version...
It's the same as saying: "I don't trust you because you are honest and buy my games..."
scaine 5 Jul
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Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: scaine
Quoting: mr-victory
Quoting: finaldestI am looking at you, Paradox
Does Paradox implement non-Steam DRM? Why are you looking at Paradox?

Because the Paradox business model is based entirely on DRM. If they implement this, and you resent Denuvo enough to avoid buying anything encumbered with it, then this will affect a LOT of DLC.

For example - Surviving Mars is £28, but its DLC is another £80. City Skylines is £23, but its DLC comes to a cool £160. Crusader Kings is free... but (brace yourself) has £220 of DLC available.

I actually don't mind the model - I like that they support their older games with constant expansions (unlike Ubisoft), and at the end of the day, you buy what appeals to you. But that's a lot of DLC to apply DRM to.
While the Paradox business model is certainly based on selling a bunch of DLC, as far as I'm aware they don't even have DRM on the base games, let alone the DLC, so I don't see how you can say their business model is based entirely on DRM. At least, I'm pretty sure I've played Stellaris off-line.

Anyway, aren't the DLC DeNuvo are talking about more like all the stuff people get for aesthetics or pay-to-win in free-to-play games? Seemed to me it was more like that, making sure you can't copy what you get from microtransactions. No doubt it would work for real DLC too, but I feel like that isn't really the focus.

Oops, I meant DLC. Their business model is based on DLC, and no, they don't (yet) use DRM, but I was suggesting a hugely negative impact if they did. Apologies. Goddam TLAs...
BlooAlien 5 Jul
Quoting: RTherenI vote to officially rename year 2022 to Bizzaro Year.

I know, right? What's up with that? It's like the crazy is more contagious than the COVID was…
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