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It seems at some point over the last month or two, GOG finally removed the "in progress" notice for GOG Galaxy coming to Linux.

Something that was a bit overdue, since they clearly have no plans to actually bring GOG Galaxy to Linux despite it being the most voted-for feature request for many years. GOG and CD Projekt never really took it seriously though, with even the official Cyberpunk 2077 Twitter account trolling "We can assure you: it‘s not us. We are the driving force behind 'add Linux support for GOG Galaxy' though" in reply to GOG post about showing 2077 gameplay.

Every time I've spoken to the GOG team over the last few years, they just repeatedly told me it wasn't planned, despite the wishlist entry still listing it as "in progress" and their original announcement mentioning it would come to Linux too and that it was "being done with PC, Mac and Linux in mind" (so much for that huh?).

At least there's applications like the Heroic Games Launcher and Lutris that can help you manage your GOG games on Linux. Still, it would be nice if GOG at some point put some more resources into improving their Linux support. Plus, if you're going to be using a Steam Deck, buying from Steam just makes a lot more sense when it's far easier to access so I imagine that's eventually going to cost GOG a few more sales too and they're not exactly doing well.

It is a shame for those that want the Galaxy client, as I actually love what GOG do. The main idea that you can just log in and download a full offline installer is great and their repeated revivals of old games is wonderful too. But without Galaxy, some games end up missing features for Linux or just skipping a Linux build entirely on GOG.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Apps, Editorial, GOG, Meta
37 Likes
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90 comments
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Nocifer 2 Jul
Quoting: Guest
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: Pit
Quoting: jens(they could have made Proton completely closed, but decided to go 100% Open Source!).
It's based on wine. So no, they could not have kept it closed. So please don't make an essential requirement look like they did a great thing.
It needs Wine to work, but Proton itself is a separate thing, and Wine is LGPL not GPL, so there's nothing to stop someone from attaching Wine to a closed module. Sooo, yes, they could have kept Proton closed.

Well they do already do that if you think about it. Steam is the module.

Then how am I able to use Proton with Lutris, Heroic, etc? Even if Steam is "the module" in your analogy, Proton is still an independent, completely open-source tool than anyone can use freely without ever touching Steam. And it was Valve's choice that's made it so.

Quoting: Guest
Quoting: mphuZ
Quoting: GuestWell they do already do that if you think about it. Steam is the module.

You've turned everything around. Steam is a store. Proton is a separate module.

I think you missed my point entirely, which was that if Valve were such open source champions they've have an open source client.

A) There is a slight difference between restructuring and open-sourcing an already existing code base, and developing something as open source from the ground up.

B) What purpose (other than ideology) would an open source Steam client serve at this point in time? You'd still be shackled by it as a form of DRM, if that's what you're alluding to. And nobody said Valve are the "open source champions" - they're just a business that saw a great chance and took advantage of it, and in the process of taking advantage of it have managed to show more respect towards both their customers and the open source community at large than any other tech company of the same caliber, ever.

While GOG, on the other hand, are a company that even when given the opportunity to "steal" a piece of their competitor's efforts and convert it into their own success* without so much as lifting a finger, they refuse to do it and instead fool around with porn games "adult novels" as their preferred way of expanding their business. I mean, come on, this is fast becoming too ridiculous to even comment on.

(*Because if GOG ever utilized Proton in their own Linux client and marketed themselves as champions of "DRM-free" in every aspect of the gaming stack, now THAT would be a case for an "open source champion" in the making.)

Quoting: Guest
Quoting: scaine
Quoting: GuestValve gets too much credit in my opinion, and have basically bought goodwill by contributing to open source projects for the explicit purpose of having people reliant on their proprietary client. Microsoft also contribute to open source projects, yet hardly anyone (who isn't paid to do so) praises them in such a fashion.

Good grief, Mirv. You seem to be suggesting that Microsoft should get more goodwill for open sourcing stuff than Valve. Which is either delusional, trolling, or you're just really young and just don't remember what Microsoft is.

Because while they're both big corporate entities which only do stuff to further their own gain, Microsoft could open source another 10 thousand tools and still be as untrustworthy then as they were 20 years ago when they were funding SCO to blackmail entire industries with patent trolling. And just one example of how utterly shitty Microsoft are from top to bottom.

Valve get a lot of praise incidentally, sure, but their motivations aren't, unlike Microsoft, directly opposed to Linux as a viable desktop.

Another case of someone completely missing the point of what I wrote, and in this case, trying to put words into my mouth (or into my text area, as it were).

Well shit, I'm done. Can't contribute to a discussion without that happening. Too many people are far too eager to go nuts at me instead I guess. I mean, how dare I have what's viewed as an opposing opinion (whether it even is or not).

It seems as if every time I see you taking part in any discussion, it goes like this: you express your opinion -> people express their own opinions about your opinion -> you declare you're done and you're never going to participate again in such debates -> you participate in the next such debate.

Why all this animosity? Nobody called you out, and certainly not scaine. Can't you just reply to his opinion without making it seem like it's personal?

EDIT: Just wanted to add, in case it wasn't already obvious, that I too don't think there's anything wrong with mirv's opinions or his way of expressing them, in fact I agree with him more often than not. That's why I'm baffled to see this nice thread devolve into a kind-of-personal clash for seemingly no reason at all.


Last edited by Nocifer on 4 July 2022 at 8:13 am UTC
Pengling 2 Jul
Quoting: scaineFour of the top 13 I snipped there relate to FOSS or Linux. So 30% of items that will never happen despite a combined total of 62000 votes. With another 30% of them complete already, the rest of the items, combined, amount to 61000 votes.

You know, maybe they have millions of customers. But repeat customers? I doubt it.

And maybe there's overlap in the votes, so they're downplaying it? You can see that I voted on two of the Linux items (they're in orange), at least. But still - if GOG released a Linux client, I'm pretty sure they'd be guaranteed AT LEAST 33K new customers. The synergy between anti-DRM and Linux users is pretty big. I'd be supportive and I think if you care enough to vote on a tracker like this, those others care too.

But I've spent over TEN TIMES more on the Steam summer sale in one week than I have on GOG in over eight YEARS. Because they don't have a Galaxy client.
Quoting: Nociferthey're just a business that saw a great chance and took advantage of it, and in the process of taking advantage of it have managed to show more respect towards both their customers and the open source community at large than any other tech company of the same caliber, ever.
Come to think of it, these points remind me of the "Crappy products for crappy customers." (i.e., catering to consumers that few companies want to bother with, but which would create a bigger market if someone tried to feed it) phase of disruption in business; I think it was part of the "Blue Ocean" strategy, but it's been many years since I read up on it so I may be misremembering its origin. It's a real pity that GOG didn't go for it (in their early days, I thought they eventually would), because they definitely had that connection with the Linux market right out of the gate.
scaine 2 Jul
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QuoteAnother case of someone completely missing the point of what I wrote, and in this case, trying to put words into my mouth (or into my text area, as it were).

Well shit, I'm done. Can't contribute to a discussion without that happening. Too many people are far too eager to go nuts at me instead I guess. I mean, how dare I have what's viewed as an opposing opinion (whether it even is or not).

I'm sad to see you go, Mirv. That last sentence is a bit ironic though, eh? I have an opposed opinion to you, how dare I?

I always enjoyed what you brought to the table - a developer's view of Linux gaming, but still with a gamer's perspective. I'll miss your chat, although I stand by what I said about Microsoft.
denyasis 2 Jul
Quoting: NociferA) There is a slight difference between restructuring and open-sourcing an already existing code base, and developing something as open source from the ground up

I'm no dev, and maybe I'm fundamentally not understanding the purpose of OSI and similar licenses, but I thought if you take an existing OSI licensed code base, added/changed/modified it, that your finished product would still need to be Open Source, right?

Yeah, Valve could have written some closed source code for proton, but given the number of open source projects they rely on, how much could the realistically make closed? The installer script maybe?
x_wing 3 Jul
Quoting: ShmerlPython though isn't a good idea for APU use case. I wish they'd used some compiled language for better performance.

If good or bad depends of your application in the end. I really doubt that handling controllers setup is a CPU intensive operation plus you can use Python C API if you need some speed up for certain components. The only con I see on that project is that they are using Python 2, to which the support ended in 2019.


Last edited by x_wing on 3 July 2022 at 3:37 am UTC
Shmerl 3 Jul
Quoting: x_wingIf good or bad depends of your application in the end. I really doubt that handling controllers setup is a CPU intensive operation plus you can use Python C API if you need some speed up for certain components. The only con I see on that project is that they are using Python 2, to which the support ended in 2019.

I suppose depends on how constantly it's used. If it's running all the time - it can be more CPU / RAM taxing than using something that doesn't require a beefy runtime.

On a normal CPU set up that might be of minimal concern, but on an APU resources are more expensive.

In general, I'd never recommend using Python for hardware support. Rust is a better idea.


Last edited by Shmerl on 3 July 2022 at 3:39 am UTC
x_wing 3 Jul
Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: x_wingIf good or bad depends of your application in the end. I really doubt that handling controllers setup is a CPU intensive operation plus you can use Python C API if you need some speed up for certain components. The only con I see on that project is that they are using Python 2, to which the support ended in 2019.

I suppose depends on how constantly it's used. If it's running all the time - it can be more CPU / RAM taxing than using something that doesn't require a beefy runtime.

On a normal CPU set up that might be of minimal concern, but on an APU resources are more expensive.

In general, I'd never recommend using Python for hardware support. Rust is a better idea.

Well, controllers should be handled in an async way. If this program requires a lot of CPU, I would start doubting of the quality of the code. Either way, you must run some benchs in order to be 100% sure. Rewriting because it may be better is definitely gambling and, probably, a waste of time.


Last edited by x_wing on 3 July 2022 at 3:46 am UTC
CatKiller 3 Jul
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Quoting: denyasisI'm no dev, and maybe I'm fundamentally not understanding the purpose of OSI and similar licenses, but I thought if you take an existing OSI licensed code base, added/changed/modified it, that your finished product would still need to be Open Source, right?
Nope. There are plenty of OSI-approved licences that aren't copyleft.
jens 3 Jul
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Quoting: scaine
QuoteAnother case of someone completely missing the point of what I wrote, and in this case, trying to put words into my mouth (or into my text area, as it were).

Well shit, I'm done. Can't contribute to a discussion without that happening. Too many people are far too eager to go nuts at me instead I guess. I mean, how dare I have what's viewed as an opposing opinion (whether it even is or not).

I'm sad to see you go, Mirv. That last sentence is a bit ironic though, eh? I have an opposed opinion to you, how dare I?

I always enjoyed what you brought to the table - a developer's view of Linux gaming, but still with a gamer's perspective. I'll miss your chat, although I stand by what I said about Microsoft.

@Mirv, I’m also sad to see you’ve left. I didn’t had the impression that I moved out of line. If I stepped on a wrong foot of yours, I apologize, that certainly wasn’t my intention. I hope you’ll reconsider leaving this site, wise old men ( ) with different views and knowledge are a rare good these days and are certainly needed for a balanced discussion.


Last edited by jens on 3 July 2022 at 1:13 pm UTC
Frawo 3 Jul
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Quoting: techieg33kIt's tricky and costly for me. IF the game is one I'll play on the Steam Deck then I obviously buy it on Steam...it's just too easy, but then I tend to add the game to my wishlist at GoG and when the price is low enough I plan to buy it on GoG to create an offline back for future game preservation playing. If it's a game I will only ever play on my PC, then I snag it on GoG only.
Being able to have an offline backup of a game (even if only Windows), is very important to me...I am also enjoying my old NES games now thanks to owning the physical game and getting an Analogue NT Mini a while back, and it got me think about what if I want to play a game (backlog or replay) in 10, 20, 30 years....will Steam be around?

P.S. Yes, I have an older computer and my current computer that I plan to keep alive and drivers back up offline for future needs.
There is no need to rebuy a game on GOG just to have an offline backup. For Steam games, you can also make a backup of your "common" folder (and maybe "compatdata" for non native games), and you're good to go.
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