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The latest Steam Hardware & Software Survey is out for June 2022, putting the Linux user share at one of its highest ever points and likely thanks to the rise of the Steam Deck and SteamOS. As shown on our dedicated Steam Tracker, it's been trending upwards for quite a while but this latest figure is a pretty good showing.

As of June 2022, Linux is sitting at 1.18% of the Steam user share.

Now, that doesn't sound like a lot on paper, but it puts the monthly active Linux user count at around 1,557,600 at least (based on when Valve last gave the monthly active user count).

Here's the breakdown of the most popular Linux systems:

  • "Arch Linux" 64 bit 11.42% -1.43%
  • "Manjaro Linux" 64 bit 10.11% -0.98%
  • Ubuntu 22.04 LTS 64 bit 9.90% +1.86%
  • Ubuntu 20.04.4 LTS 64 bit 9.73% -2.02%
  • "SteamOS Holo" 64 bit 7.58% +2.35%
  • Linux Mint 20.3 64 bit 6.45% +0.48%
  • Description:Freedesktop.org 21.08.14 (Flatpak runtime) 64 bit 6.05% +6.05%
  • Pop!_OS 22.04 LTS 64 bit 4.79% +4.79%
  • Other 33.96% -11.11%

So you can pretty plainly see that the Steam Deck with SteamOS is already rising up the ranks, as one of the most popular Linux gaming systems on Steam's survey with it already making up well over 7% of Linux players which is a nice increase from the 5% from May 2022.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Editorial, Meta, Steam
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3zekiel 3 Jul
  • Supporter
Quoting: denyasisQuestion, I'm not familiar with snap/flatpack, but if it keeps everything in the container, does that mean it limits what it can access outside the container? Like prevents Steam from reading the rest of my /home partition for example?

For Flatpak, indeed, it will protect your /home from Steam reading and writing anywhere it wants. You can of course add supplementary paths, notably with "flatseal" app, that's what I do with my library being on another drive than my /home. You can also add paths as read only, as an example for music access.

For snaps, depending on what the application packager does (enable full home access by default or not), it should also protect your /home. I also remember that snap has no support for fine grained permissions (allowing one specific folder). At least from the last time I used it. And there is no "flatseal" equivalent for easy management of permissions.
g000h 3 Jul
Quoting: nocriAccording to the trend line in the plot, linux will hit 50% of the market share sometime in June of 2500. I need to make memo for my grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand children to check this out :)

Heh. I did a similar calculation a year or two ago, regarding the length of time before the Earth became completely broken and not habitable and it is shorter than that, i.e. 300 years.

I'm guessing your calculation is based on linear growth, rather than exponential (or other) mathematical model?
kokoko3k 3 Jul
Quoting: g000h
Quoting: nocriAccording to the trend line in the plot, linux will hit 50% of the market share sometime in June of 2500. I need to make memo for my grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand children to check this out :)

Heh. I did a similar calculation a year or two ago, regarding the length of time before the Earth became completely broken and not habitable and it is shorter than that, i.e. 300 years.

I'm guessing your calculation is based on linear growth, rather than exponential (or other) mathematical model?
We have to ask liam how is the trend.
Lightkey 3 Jul
Quoting: kokoko3k
Quoting: g000h
Quoting: nocriAccording to the trend line in the plot, linux will hit 50% of the market share sometime in June of 2500. I need to make memo for my grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand children to check this out :)

Heh. I did a similar calculation a year or two ago, regarding the length of time before the Earth became completely broken and not habitable and it is shorter than that, i.e. 300 years.

I'm guessing your calculation is based on linear growth, rather than exponential (or other) mathematical model?
We have to ask liam how is the trend.
For that, best ignore the official graph, which is skewed by unrealistically high swings in Chinese (100% Windows) users, causing the perceived upwards trend of Linux. The best indicator of relative growth is the graph limited to English-only users, showing Linux user share being mostly flat until the Steam Deck was announced, at the bottom of the Steam Tracker page.
Great for Valve and the Steam Deck, but what does it really mean for Linux? It reminds me of the Android situation, where everybody who has an Android phone in their pocket is technically using Linux, but that in and of itself does nothing to advance the cause for Linux.
Quoting: nocriAccording to the trend line in the plot, linux will hit 50% of the market share sometime in June of 2500. I need to make memo for my grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand children to check this out :)
Well, yes, but now that Valve have "more than doubled" production of Steam Decks, the trend line should improve; we could hit 50% by only around 2260!
Quoting: Mountain ManGreat for Valve and the Steam Deck, but what does it really mean for Linux? It reminds me of the Android situation, where everybody who has an Android phone in their pocket is technically using Linux, but that in and of itself does nothing to advance the cause for Linux.
I think there is a pretty simple, key distinction here: Programs written to run on Android will not run on desktop Linux. But programs written to run on SteamOS, or for that matter programs SteamOS arranges to run even though they were written for Windows, do.
So. Improving the software ecosystem for Android does not improve it for Linux, but improving the software ecosystem for SteamOS does.
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  • Supporter Plus
Quoting: mphuZIt's a shame that Valve hasn't released the SteamOS desktop distribution yet.
And even the new Big Picture is missing in the beta version of Steam.
We need a Steam Controller 2 to properly use the Deck's UI on the desktop... we are missing, at the very least, tge Steam button and the one that brings up tge overlay.

There is a way to use the DeckUI on the desktop now, with just normal Steam.
Pengling 3 Jul
Quoting: denyasisI wouldn't be surprised if it does a survey on first run (which is ancedotally consistent with my experience with Steam; survey on new installation.)
Man, that's so weird to me - I've got Steam installed on three machines, and I've never had the survey at all! I'm a relatively recent Steam user though (my account's not even a year old yet), having returned to PC-gaming after an extremely long absence (I left it behind when you could still buy big-box games from Toys 'R' Us and Woolworths, and when Electronics Boutique UK still existed), so I wonder if that's a factor?


Last edited by Pengling on 3 July 2022 at 3:35 pm UTC
udekmp69 3 Jul
Quoting: denyasisQuestion, I'm not familiar with snap/flatpack, but if it keeps everything in the container, does that mean it limits what it can access outside the container? Like prevents Steam from reading the rest of my /home partition for example?

Yes. Although different applications have different permissions by default, I would recommend installing flatseal to a get a good GUI for permissions of each application including Steam. Steam's flatpak default permission cannot see anything other than ~/.var/app/com.valvesoftware.Steam/. You can give it an additional permission to see a 'steamlibrary' folder on a secondary hard drive as well. Flatpak has room for improvement but I generally prefer it for closed source applications if it works okay with it.


Last edited by udekmp69 on 3 July 2022 at 5:02 pm UTC
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