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AMD announced "Zen 4" with Ryzen 7000 series, RDNA3 teased

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AMD has revealed their next-generation Zen 4 processors with the Ryzen 7000 series that will be launching September 27.

They're saying it will give a "double-digit" IPC (instructions per cycle/clock) uplift compared to the previous generation. AMD are also claiming they will be a lot more efficient than before, leveraging the power management tech from their mobile processors.

Here's the models they've announced for now:

 Model  Cores/Threads  Boost / Base Frequency  Total Cache  PCIe  TDP Price
 AMD Ryzen 9 7950X  16C/32T  Up to 5.7 / 4.5 GHZ  80MB  Gen 5  170W  $699
 AMD Ryzen 9 7900X  12C/24T  Up to 5.6 / 4.7 GHZ  76MB  Gen 5  170W  $549
 AMD Ryzen 7 7700X  8C/16T  Up to 5.4 / 4.5 GHZ  40MB  Gen 5  105W  $399
 AMD Ryzen 5 7600X  6C/12T  Up to 5.3 / 4.7 GHZ  38MB  Gen 5  105W  $299

This also comes with the new AM5 platform with dual-channel DD5 memory support, up to 24 PCIe 5.0 lanes and they say AM5 will be supported through to 2025. So you're going to be good for the next few generations of AMD processors with AM5. Installation they said will be easier than before with the 1718 pin LGA socket, it supports AM4 coolers too.

These are the chipsets that will be offered:

  • AMD X670 Extreme: Bringing the most connectivity and extreme overclocking capabilities with PCIe 5.0 support for graphics and storage.
  • AMD X670: Supporting enthusiast overclocking with PCIe® 5.0 support for storage and optional graphics support.
  • AMD B650E: Designed for performance users with PCIe® 5.0 storage support and optional graphics support.
  • AMD B650: Designed for mainstream users with support for DDR5 memory and optional PCIe® 5.0 support.

AMD X670 and X670E will be available in September but the B650E and B650 set land in October.

We also got a brief teaser of their next-generation GPUs with RDNA3 as well. During the event AMD CEO Dr. Lisa Su mentioned it uses 5nm chiplets, to provide a "more than 50%" performance per watt uplift compared to RDNA2.

You can watch the full event below:

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35 comments
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dpanter 30 Aug
Gief Zen4 with 3D V-Cache! Can't wait to see benchmarks early 2023.
Eike 30 Aug
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So AMD is not doing big and little cores, like Intel does?
jordicoma 30 Aug
Quoting: EikeSo AMD is not doing big and little cores, like Intel does?
Intel does big/little because they are unable to deliver cores with little power consumption. AMD with 5nm should be capable to use less power.
It's only me or the prices are high. My ryzen 1600x cost much less when I bought.
Well... I'll wait for am6 or risc-v.


Last edited by jordicoma on 30 August 2022 at 9:33 am UTC
mr-victory 30 Aug
Min 6 cores? Isn't there an entry model or something?
darven 30 Aug
Quoting: EikeSo AMD is not doing big and little cores, like Intel does?

Rumors has it that they might do a big/little with a zen4/zen5 combo. But then as stated earlier, Zen are so efficient that they do not need it.

Remember that the effecient cores are just rebranded Atom-style cores. Nothing impressive and are just plain better to avoid if possible.
illwieckz 30 Aug
Quoting: mr-victoryMin 6 cores? Isn't there an entry model or something?

6 cores is entry model… They do 6 cores and 8 cores since more than a decade (here, the linked models are from 2011).

What is more problematic is that a 6 core CPU from AMD like the FX-6100 was costing $165 at introduction with 95W TDP while now the Ryzen 5 7600X is $299 with 105W. They can definitely produce some more-entry-level CPUs (probably released later?), they just have no reason to make them having less than 6 cores.

If I'm right even the 6 core FX-6100 from 2011 was in fact produced with 8 cores with 2 being disabled… Producing a CPU with less than 6 cores in 2022 is probably requiring a specific production process that would skyrocket their price for no benefit… the less costly solution to produce CPUs with less than 6 cores in 2022 is probably to produce the cores and to disable them. Better keep them enabled if they work.
Eike 30 Aug
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Quoting: illwieckz
Quoting: mr-victoryMin 6 cores? Isn't there an entry model or something?

6 cores is entry model… They do 6 cores and 8 cores since more than a decade (here, the linked models are from 2011).

What is more problematic is that a 6 core CPU from AMD like the FX-6100 was costing $165 at introduction with 95W TDP while now the Ryzen 5 7600X is $299 with 105W. They can definitely produce some more-entry-level CPUs (probably released later?), they just have no reason to make them having less than 6 cores.

If I'm right even the 6 core FX-6100 from 2011 was in fact produced with 8 cores with 2 being disabled… Producing a CPU with less than 6 cores in 2022 is probably requiring a specific production process that would skyrocket their price for no benefit… the less costly solution to produce CPUs with less than 6 cores in 2022 is probably to produce the cores and to disable them. Better keep them enabled if they work.

I can get a CPU good enough for many things for 50 Euros from Intel, 2 cores, released in 2022 ("G6900T").
I'd buy such a thing e.g. for my HTPC if the last one gives up.
Dunno why AMD shouldn't be able to make something similar.
Will these ones contain the Pluton backdoor?
illwieckz 30 Aug
Quoting: EikeI can get a CPU good enough for many things for 50 Euros from Intel, 2 cores, released in 2022 ("G6900T").
I'd buy such a thing e.g. for my HTPC if the last one gives up.

The Ryzen 5 7600X is the entry level model for the mainstream range of products. You don't compare the same range of products. 1. this is Ryzen, 2. this is Ryzen 5, it is expected to be good for gaming.

The G6900T is a Celeron for light clients, point of sales and tablets, on AMD side you may want to look for lower-end Ryzen 3 or Athlon. Even the Ryzen 3 range (“entry level” Ryzen range) may still be too high level for what your are looking for as they are still Ryzen CPUs (Ryzen is not the entry level family).

Quoting: EikeDunno why AMD shouldn't be able to make something similar.

Of course they do something similar, they even have more low-level CPU families. What's right is that they are harder to find as a consumer outside of OEM, I would agree on that and maybe in the end you will buy Intel because of that, who knows…

I just picked some AMD CPUs (not all are listed there unfortunately) for a comparison:
https://www.cpubenchmark.net/compare//4605vs4924vs4927vs4389

AMD has released a 2 core Ryzen 3 5125C in May 2022 but is not listed by cpubenchmark.net yet but you may look at the 4 core 5300GE and remind it has twice the cores but is from more than one years ago so you should get something between the Athlon Gold 3150C and the Ryzen 3 5300GE, but with less energy consumption than the Celeron for sure.

Producing 2 cores Ryzen 5 doesn't make sense for AMD, that's for other ranges of products (and they exist).


Last edited by illwieckz on 30 August 2022 at 12:46 pm UTC
Lightkey 30 Aug
Quoting: EikeI can get a CPU good enough for many things for 50 Euros from Intel, 2 cores, released in 2022 ("G6900T").
I'd buy such a thing e.g. for my HTPC if the last one gives up.
Dunno why AMD shouldn't be able to make something similar.

In short: because Intel has their own fabs and AMD doesn't.

In long: AMD had these models in form of Athlon 200GE and Ryzen 3000G, also plenty of dual-cores in mobile and embedded space with codenames Dali/Pollock/Banded Kestrel (no clue what the differences are, seems to be the same design), only released in 2020. These still use Zen cores (not even Zen+), so cheaply produced at GlobalFoundries. If they wanted to release successors, they would be cutting into their 7 nm production share at TSMC (which is negotiated years in advance), which is already stretched thin between millions of chips for PlayStation 5/Xbox S/X, GPUs, accelerators, server chips.. so they focused on the high-margin products first (and low-margin console chips because of long-running contracts, I read that those alone made up about 80 % of their 7 nm production share about a year ago). They have just released a successor for the mobile market with a Zen 2 quad-core / 2 CUs RDNA2 IGP called Mendocino intended for Chromebooks, so there seems to finally be some movement there.
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