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Do you love your point and click adventures? We have another to highlight with Justin Wack and the Big Time Hack that will have Native Linux support.

In Justin Wack and the Big Time Hack, you play three characters trying to unite lost lovers, getting a fun-loving caveman back to his own time, all while steering clear of the scary-looking robots trying to erase you from the timeline. Originally funded on Kickstarter raising $32k due to the support of 469 backers, including Ron Gilbert (of Monkey Island fame). Linux support was a stretch-goal that seemingly wasn't hit but they're doing it now anyway.

Original trailer:

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You can follow it on Steam. No GOG release yet as they don't seem interested in it but you can vote here.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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5 comments

Im so glad seeing Boomer Clickers making a comeback
const 9 Aug
Quoting: StoneColdSpiderIm so glad seeing Boomer Clickers making a comeback

Just came to say the same. Hard to believe this genre was very very much dead until Deadalic reactivated it and now new titles come up all the time.


Last edited by const on 9 August 2022 at 10:26 am UTC
tuubi 9 Aug
Quoting: const
Quoting: StoneColdSpiderIm so glad seeing Boomer Clickers making a comeback

Just came to say the same. Hard to believe this genre was very very much dead until Deadalic reactivated it and now new titles come up all the time.

It wasn't quite dead. I think it just got drowned out by the explosion of other types of games for a while. I mean there were never that many adventure game releases per year even in the good old days.

In addition to Daedalic, developers (and publishers) like Telltale, Revolution Software, Wadjet Eye, KING Art and others kept traditional adventure gaming alive through the dry spell for fans of the genre.
const 9 Aug
Quoting: tuubi
Quoting: const
Quoting: StoneColdSpiderIm so glad seeing Boomer Clickers making a comeback

Just came to say the same. Hard to believe this genre was very very much dead until Deadalic reactivated it and now new titles come up all the time.

It wasn't quite dead. I think it just got drowned out by the explosion of other types of games for a while. I mean there were never that many adventure game releases per year even in the good old days.

In addition to Daedalic, developers (and publishers) like Telltale, Revolution Software, Wadjet Eye, KING Art and others kept traditional adventure gaming alive through the dry spell for fans of the genre.

The classical (2D) point and click adventures (especiall those with monkey island like humor) absolutely looked dead between 1998 and 2008, when Edna and Harvey released.
TellTales Sam and Max Season One might shorten that to 2006 but I wouldn't call that a classical point and click. I wouldn't even get myself to replay these games, though I celebrated their release (Just to find they ran horribly on wine back then). TellTale games aged horribly.


Last edited by const on 9 August 2022 at 5:38 pm UTC
tuubi 10 Aug
Quoting: const
Quoting: tuubi
Quoting: const
Quoting: StoneColdSpiderIm so glad seeing Boomer Clickers making a comeback

Just came to say the same. Hard to believe this genre was very very much dead until Deadalic reactivated it and now new titles come up all the time.

It wasn't quite dead. I think it just got drowned out by the explosion of other types of games for a while. I mean there were never that many adventure game releases per year even in the good old days.

In addition to Daedalic, developers (and publishers) like Telltale, Revolution Software, Wadjet Eye, KING Art and others kept traditional adventure gaming alive through the dry spell for fans of the genre.

The classical (2D) point and click adventures (especiall those with monkey island like humor) absolutely looked dead between 1998 and 2008, when Edna and Harvey released.
TellTales Sam and Max Season One might shorten that to 2006 but I wouldn't call that a classical point and click. I wouldn't even get myself to replay these games, though I celebrated their release (Just to find they ran horribly on wine back then). TellTale games aged horribly.
Well, setting aside your preferences and focusing on the whole genre, here's some traditional and non-traditional adventure game releases from the "dead" period, in case you missed them:

  • 1999: Discworld Noir, Gabriel Knight III

  • 2000: The Longest Journey, Escape from Monkey Island, Dracula: The Resurrection

  • 2001: Runaway: The Road Adventure, Gilbert Goodmate and the Mushroom of Phungoria

  • 2002: Syberia, Tony Tough and the Night of Roasted Moths, Simon the Sorcerer 3D

  • 2003: The Black Mirror, Broken Sword: The Sleeping Dragon, Samorost

  • 2004: Syberia II, Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Silver Earring, Return to Mysterious Island

  • 2005: Nibiru: Age Of Secrets, Still Life, Ankh: The Tales of Mystery, Samorost 2

  • 2006: Dreamfall: The Longest Journey, Secret Files: Tunguska, Broken Sword: The Angel of Death, Al Emmo and the Lost Dutchman's Mine


I see some proper classics on that list, but you seem to be talking about a narrow subset of the traditional adventure genre and only a couple of these would fit your definition. I guess adventure games were properly dead for you personally.

Oh and of course there was also the active hobbyist community at adventuregamestudio.co.uk, and you can still download tons of free and fun games to play, all 2D and most with silly comedy. Old versions of the engine were janky at best, but they should still run with Wine.
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