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Rust for Steam Deck / Linux still some time away

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For those of you wanting to play Rust again on Linux desktop or Steam Deck, it sounds like it's still some time away as Facepunch continues thinking on Easy Anti-Cheat support.

While for some developers it may just be a case of ticking a box, or putting things in the right place, we know that's not always the case. Outside of the technical implementation, developers also need to think on EAC's effectiveness and about opening their games to another platform to protect against cheating.

In the case of Rust, it seems the biggest issue is the protection that Easy Anti-Cheat can offer and if it's worth the time involved in setting it up and supporting it in a public environment.

On Twitter, Facepunch's Garry Newman mentioned in reply to a user:

We're working through some issues, trying to justify it. It would be a lot of extra work to put on EAC, we can't do it if it's detrimental to the main Windows player base..

When I replied asking about Steam Deck, Newman replied:

Well that's what we're evaluating. Steam Deck compatibility is the only reason to do it at all..

As a follow-up when asked what the issues are Newman said:

It's not one issue. I worry that by opening another platform we're forcing EAC to spread themselves too thin. I don't want to put that pressure on them if it's going to reduce effectiveness of their team on Windows. When we had a Linux version before we...

... noticed that while the majority of cheaters were on Windows, a good chunk of actual cheat makers used Linux and stayed undetected for a long long time. Trying to persuade EAC to hunt these handful of people down wouldn't be a great use of their time considering their impact..

.. on the overall population of the game. So internally we're talking about whether this is a door worth opening. This isn't a linux thing, it's a "another platform" thing.

It's hard to argue such a clear explanation of the issue at hand. Developers of games that are primarily multiplayer will always be thinking hard on opening them up to another platform.

That said, Easy Anti-Cheat must be somewhat effective even on Linux / Steam Deck as it seems it's good enough for EA / Respawn with Apex Legends which has a player base multiple times larger on Steam compared with Rust. But, one size does not fit all of course. Newman mentioned this too in a reply to a user asking about it and it's another fair point:

I don't know too much about the cheating situation in Apex to talk about it. Rust is really sensitive to cheating. A cheater doesn't ruin a single 10 minute match, they ruin 3 weeks of hard work and grind.

Something to make you think, not something specific I had actually considered before either about the vastly different use-case for a game like Rust.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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10 comments

mr-victory 27 Sep
Rust EAC situation started to get boring...
How would EAC be detrimental to the Windows player base?

Is it not already a part of the game?

Is this some stigma that it’s easier to avoid EAC on Linux?

QuoteI worry that by opening another platform we're forcing EAC to spread themselves too thin.

What? Is this an internal team or actually the staffing at EAC? Why would the Rust devs care about EAC company’s staffing?

Reading their reasoning so far it seems they’re looking for every reason NOT to improve their game with Linux compatibility.

Yo Rust devs, people just want to play your game.


Last edited by itscalledreality on 27 September 2022 at 2:02 pm UTC
Liam Dawe 27 Sep
Quoting: itscalledrealityWhat? Is this an internal team or actually the staffing at EAC? Why would the Rust devs care about EAC company’s staffing?
The feeling that comes across is that EAC is not particularly big, and every new game that gets hooked up and every new platform (like Linux / Steam Deck) spreads their resources.

Naturally, all developers want to ensure their games are secured, and it's things they have to think about. The Rust developers obviously know a lot more than we do and more than they can publicly say about it all. I think Garry made the point pretty clear in the quotes there that doesn't really need a whole lot of explanation?

If you really need it spelled out: extra resources spread across a small user-base is not exactly a wise business decision. That can change, if Linux / Steam Deck grow a lot more because then naturally resources will flow towards it.


Last edited by Liam Dawe on 27 September 2022 at 2:29 pm UTC
CatKiller 27 Sep
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If you're going to hem and haw about whether you can be bothered to do a thing at all, it's probably best if you hadn't already bragged about how excited you are to do it and how well it's all going 14 months prior. What an absolute clown shoe.
Kuduzkehpan 27 Sep
There should be some developer tags next to game tags in Steam so i can tag the developers and companyies if they ara TRUSTWORTHY or NOT. Also some players dont want to play RUST again They just want Refund still. Because they paid for Rust to play on Linux not in windows or not with transgaming. So whatever their desicion is i call BAN RUST in steam deck or just stop proton to work with it. So i feel justice.

i hate this kind of developers and companies.
let me tell something even Microsoft is building Linux version of its Edge internet browser.
Quoting: Liam Dawe
Quoting: itscalledrealityWhat? Is this an internal team or actually the staffing at EAC? Why would the Rust devs care about EAC company’s staffing?
The feeling that comes across is that EAC is not particularly big, and every new game that gets hooked up and every new platform (like Linux / Steam Deck) spreads their resources.

Naturally, all developers want to ensure their games are secured, and it's things they have to think about. The Rust developers obviously know a lot more than we do and more than they can publicly say about it all. I think Garry made the point pretty clear in the quotes there that doesn't really need a whole lot of explanation?

If you really need it spelled out: extra resources spread across a small user-base is not exactly a wise business decision. That can change, if Linux / Steam Deck grow a lot more because then naturally resources will flow towards it.

Sure I agree with that, thanks for the clarity. Now my next question, EAC isn’t the only DRM/anti-cheat tool on the market. If EAC can’t handle taking on another game then Rust devs should shop around. Right now it sounds like you’d need to buy some sort of time investment from EAC to have effective anti-cheat software.

Then I also think that EAC should be implementable and shouldn’t require further staffing from a separate company, the software should provide all the required monitoring tools and utilities.
Quoting: itscalledrealityNow my next question, EAC isn’t the only DRM/anti-cheat tool on the market. If EAC can’t handle taking on another game then Rust devs should shop around. Right now it sounds like you’d need to buy some sort of time investment from EAC to have effective anti-cheat software.

In terms of using a different anti-cheat, it may not be worth the dev time to set up the new anti-cheat to work with the game just for a small group of people.
Quoting: CringyBoi42069
Quoting: itscalledrealityNow my next question, EAC isn’t the only DRM/anti-cheat tool on the market. If EAC can’t handle taking on another game then Rust devs should shop around. Right now it sounds like you’d need to buy some sort of time investment from EAC to have effective anti-cheat software.

In terms of using a different anti-cheat, it may not be worth the dev time to set up the new anti-cheat to work with the game just for a small group of people.

As Linux gamers are we so trained in the world that we can’t be just as demanding as the rest of the gaming consumerverse?

Lash thyself 13 times for wanting a game to support Linux because the anti-cheat company is short staffed and the game devs are wading around in the muck. :P
crashniela 29 Sep
My first experience to Linux was because of cheats so I can get where they are coming from. It is way easier to setup undetectable cheats in Linux than in Windows. I remember Aimtux for csgo which was an open source cheat. Used it on a lot of hvh severs but if someone were malicious he could have easily gone ranked with it (and they did).
seffyroff 1 Oct
Well, they have my sympathies. EAC is not a switch that you flick on and then it magically stops cheaters for you. It needs to be managed, each new pattern in enforcement action case needs to be reviewed (it's the least fun game of whack-a-mole). As a member of a small indie team working on a multiplayer game that uses EAC, it's a burden for one platform alone. Maintaining double the platforms for any game is a huge ask for a small team, where you probably lose a resource for more than 50% of their work time where they'd otherwise be adding features or improving other areas of the game demanding their attention. Adding on the burden of responsibly operating EAC on more than one platform as well is a massive undertaking. Don't dedicate enough resources to it and you risk punishing those playing fair whilst the cheaters run riot. The EAC team (owned by Epic) do provide significant involvement, but you don't get the best from them or from the service without committing fully to it internally, with all the resource demands that come with it. It works well for EA/Apex not only because it's a simpler play session format, but because EA has the financial muscle and clarity of where the revenue is coming from to know where the time is best spent protecting it.

My hope is that EAC as a service becomes easier to operate for developers, and that in turn lessens the burden involved in expanding to a new platform. EOS has the hint of the suggestion that this is something being worked on, but as with anything of this nature, progress is slow and deliberate. In the meantime proprietary anticheat implementations from EA and Activision on the horizon further fragment things and make any brighter future for smaller, non-closed platforms seem a lot less likely.
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