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ScummVM 2.7.0 'The Real Slim Shader' supports even more classics

By - | Views: 21,419

ScummVM 2.7.0, The Real Slim Shader, is officially out now bringing more compatibility for retro titles to modern platforms so here's what's new. What exactly is ScummVM? To put it simply: it's a whole set of different open source game engines under one roof, with each focusing on a different type of retro games.

First up, there's some fresh titles that had support added in 2.7.0 including:

  • Soldier Boyz
  • Obsidian
  • Pink Panther: Passport to Peril
  • Pink Panther: Hokus Pokus Pink
  • Adibou 2 "Environment", "Read/Count 4 & 5" and "Read/Count 6 & 7"
  • Driller/Space Station Oblivion
  • Halls of the Dead: Faery Tale Adventure II
  • Chop Suey, Eastern Mind, and 16 other Director 3 and Director 4 titles

On top of that they've improved support for the Broken Sword series and there's new translations including support added for: Chinese, Japanese and Korean versions of many games. Portability was also a focus this time around with a bunch of platforms revived to work with it including: RetroMini RS90 (using OpenDingux), 1st generation Miyoo (New BittBoy, Pocket Go and PowKiddy Q90-V90-Q20) with TriForceX MiyooCFW, Miyoo Mini, KolibriOS, 26-bit versions of RISC OS and Nintendo 3DS.

There's new shader-based scalers, going with their codename "The Real Slim Shader", so they say you can now again enjoy the "warm glow of CRTs shining on your face" and they ship with a curated set of shaders taken from LibRetro.

Lastly another highlight is pre-defined random number seeds so people can have reproducible runs in certain games, useful for speedrunners.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Misc, Open Source, Retro | Apps: ScummVM
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About the author -
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly. Find me on Mastodon.
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11 comments
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Oooooooo looking forward to trying this out......... Always love me some Scumm......... VM........
What I like in this new release:
- Shaders: less pixels, those old games look so much better with crt shaders
- They fixed serious bugs for Linux users when using ScummVM opengl interface
- They fixed an old SDL bug too for ScummVM surface renderer

I note that ScummVM devs team listen to its users, thank you!


Last edited by legluondunet on 27 February 2023 at 5:10 pm UTC
Like the shaders quite a bit.

Had to compile myself since their ubuntu.deb seems to be giving me problems every time (might be some thing messed in my system though because i had this problem with scummvm only for the last couple of versions)

They did fix the UI problems of 'Whispers of a Machine' but the performance of this title as well as 'Unavowed' were noticeably better with version 2.6.0 . Guess some of the AGS engine fixes they had in the previous version have fallen under the rug.


Last edited by Schattenspiegel on 27 February 2023 at 11:06 pm UTC
slaapliedje Feb 28
One of the best things about scummvm is that it allows old systems like the Amiga and Atari ST to play some games that were contemporary with the systems at the time, but were never released for the platforms. It also allows some enhancements to some of the games that did get native releases!

It is also ported to some of the most random things.
pb Mar 1
TIL there's Faery Tale Adventure II
I've only ever played the first one.
neolith Mar 2
Quoting: pbTIL there's Faery Tale Adventure II
I've only ever played the first one.
Oh, boy – Faery Tale Adventure! That's a game I haven't seen mentioned in a long time... I played the first one quite a bit on my Amiga back in the 80s. Haven't ever played the second one either. Maybe I should give it a try.
Quoting: neolith
Quoting: pbTIL there's Faery Tale Adventure II
I've only ever played the first one.
Oh, boy – Faery Tale Adventure! That's a game I haven't seen mentioned in a long time... I played the first one quite a bit on my Amiga back in the 80s. Haven't ever played the second one either. Maybe I should give it a try.
Nice! I went looking it up to see if part II was released on the Amiga (looks like it only came out on DOS). I never played the first one, and noticed the first was released on the Genesis as well... now to decide if I should play it on the Genesis, Amiga, or ScummVM...
Quoting: Lightkey
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: neolith
Quoting: pbTIL there's Faery Tale Adventure II
I've only ever played the first one.
Oh, boy – Faery Tale Adventure! That's a game I haven't seen mentioned in a long time... I played the first one quite a bit on my Amiga back in the 80s. Haven't ever played the second one either. Maybe I should give it a try.
Nice! I went looking it up to see if part II was released on the Amiga (looks like it only came out on DOS). I never played the first one, and noticed the first was released on the Genesis as well... now to decide if I should play it on the Genesis, Amiga, or ScummVM...
The Faery Tale Adventure was developed by MicroIllusions and released in 1987, a decade earlier. Halls of the Dead: Faery Tale Adventure II was developed by The Dreamers Guild, based on the SAGA engine used in their prior adventure games that ScummVM already supported. ScummVM does not support The Faery Tale Adventure.
Edit: But you can play Halls of the Dead: Faery Tale Adventure II on the Amiga now, thanks to ScummVM.
Ah! Thanks. Makes sense. So then... one could play the first one native on the Amiga, and the second one via ScummVM. (And yes I realize ScummVM requires a fairly beefy Amiga, but I have a few).
neolith Mar 13
Quoting: slaapliedjeAh! Thanks. Makes sense. So then... one could play the first one native on the Amiga, and the second one via ScummVM. (And yes I realize ScummVM requires a fairly beefy Amiga, but I have a few).
I sold my slightly broken Amiga500 in the mid 90s, shortly after getting my first PC. Shouldn't have done that.
Emulation to the resuce!
slaapliedje Mar 14
Quoting: neolith
Quoting: slaapliedjeAh! Thanks. Makes sense. So then... one could play the first one native on the Amiga, and the second one via ScummVM. (And yes I realize ScummVM requires a fairly beefy Amiga, but I have a few).
I sold my slightly broken Amiga500 in the mid 90s, shortly after getting my first PC. Shouldn't have done that.
Emulation to the resuce!
It's funny, I didn't have much time with the Amiga in the 90s. A friend had an A500, and then an A1200. My older brother bought his friend's A500, and I got a bit of a play with it, but I think the floppy drive died or something... can't recall what happened to it (my asshole older brother likely ended up with it, even though he's a turd sandwich and likely trashed it). But now I own two A500++ (one in a checkmate 1500 case with a Vampire V4, and another with an ACA530 in it's original case. Also two A4000s, one that is in a tower with video toaster and 060, and another in the desktop case with a Cyberstorm PPC that I currently need to put back together :P. Ha, I also have a few macs with MorphOS on it.

I love AmigaOS, it's a nice fun thing to play with that most other OSs haven't done things similar.
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