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Fedora has a big new release available in version 38 which came a bit early. As usual lots of new features and fixes, plus a fancy new Budgie desktop spin.

You can grab it as the main Fedora Workstation which includes an upgrade to GNOME 44 that's filled full of new features like the thumbnail view in the file picker, a new lock screen, enhanced quick settings with a "background apps" section, improvements to accessibility settings, better Flatpak support along with the new unfiltered view of applications on Flathub and so on. The Fedora team also made an adjustment to make shut downs faster.

Pictured - Fedora Workstation 38

This release also brings with it new official spins (alternative desktop environments) like the Budgie Desktop, "Sericea" that comes with the Sway window manager in an rpm-ostree version and a Phosh image for mobile devices. This is in addition to the existing spins with KDE, Xfce and more.

Pictured - Fedora Budgie 38.

Various other upgrades like the inclusion of the updated dnf5 package manager for testing that has performance improvements, a smaller memory footprint, and a new daemon that can provide an alternative to PackageKit.

See the release announcement for more. They also have a brand new website

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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brokeassben Apr 19
Quoting: HohlraumI love what Fedora does but once I started using other package systems 25+ years ago it's really hard to give up the massive package repositories provided by deb and arch based distributions. Finally, they've tried for years to improve the speed of their package managers but they are terrible every time I give them a try.
Same. My first Linux experience was Red Hat then Fedora once the first version of that released. Didn't realize how slow rpm packages were until I switched to Debian and Arch based distros. Maybe I'll give it another go now that Flatpaks are so common and don't have to rely on rpms so much.
micha Apr 19
While I happily run vanilla ARCH^(btw) on my main machine, I have to say: Fedora is the new Ubuntu when it comes to supports everything out of the box (plus is way easier than Windows). Upgraded to 38 yesterday with GNOME 44.4 on my couch notebook. Quite nice! =)
omer666 Apr 19
Quoting: brokeassben
Quoting: HohlraumI love what Fedora does but once I started using other package systems 25+ years ago it's really hard to give up the massive package repositories provided by deb and arch based distributions. Finally, they've tried for years to improve the speed of their package managers but they are terrible every time I give them a try.
Same. My first Linux experience was Red Hat then Fedora once the first version of that released. Didn't realize how slow rpm packages were until I switched to Debian and Arch based distros. Maybe I'll give it another go now that Flatpaks are so common and don't have to rely on rpms so much.
This has changed a great deal when Fedora switched to DNF. I've used both Arch and Debian for several years and I could barely tell the difference.
sprocket Apr 19
Quoting: iiari
Quoting: mtI immediately switched from Nobara (which is Fedora based anyway) to Fedora 38 Sway and it is just so frogging great.
Why did you switch from Nobara to Fedora?
I gave Nobara a genuine try, too, and while I like the ideas behind it, three things were dealbreakers:

1. Certain GNOME extensions could not be uninstalled without breaking the system, and these extensions caused serious performance regressions.

2. The bus factor is too low for my comfort. Which also leads to proper distro support being almost non-existent versus Fedora.

3. There wasn't a real compelling reason to stay on Nobara versus vanilla Fedora Workstation after getting past the "this is neat" factor.


Last edited by sprocket on 19 April 2023 at 9:00 pm UTC
STiAT Apr 21
Quoting: HohlraumI love what Fedora does but once I started using other package systems 25+ years ago it's really hard to give up the massive package repositories provided by deb and arch based distributions. Finally, they've tried for years to improve the speed of their package managers but they are terrible every time I give them a try.

dnf5 is actually really nice, I would even compare it to eopkg. And I never could follow the argument of too few packages, I never did miss any in any major distro (but Solus).

I personall find the debian based distros tremendously slow when it comes to package management.

Arch.. well, sweet spot there, pacman is probably the best one out there. I stopped using arch based distros due to their bad optional depend choices (if the software needs it for featurs it should not be optional, even if it is an option on compile, but there the paradigm of Arch and I have diffferent opinions).

What I can agree on, current dnf is painfully slow.


Last edited by STiAT on 21 April 2023 at 11:38 pm UTC
14 Apr 22
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I've been playing with Kinoite a little bit in a VM as a way to get hands-on with Flatpak. I don't have a solid opinion yet. I will say that trying to get vim and Kate to work is not obvious. Kate doesn't work via the app menu even though it's listed, nor is it or vim in the bash profile path. Those are pretty fundamental programs that I need to use all the time. I think this OS spin is a proof of concept, but it's an interesting one that could get traction, especially on vendor or corporate supported devices.

Quoting: STiATArch.. well, sweet spot there, pacman is probably the best one out there. I stopped using arch based distros due to their bad optional depend choices (if the software needs it for featurs it should not be optional, even if it is an option on compile, but there the paradigm of Arch and I have diffferent opinions).
If you are into using virtual machines or live USB sticks to test distros, you should try KaOS. They are not a fork of any other distro, however they use pacman for the package management tool! It has a good feel.
STiAT Apr 24
Quoting: 14I've been playing with Kinoite a little bit in a VM as a way to get hands-on with Flatpak. I don't have a solid opinion yet. I will say that trying to get vim and Kate to work is not obvious. Kate doesn't work via the app menu even though it's listed, nor is it or vim in the bash profile path. Those are pretty fundamental programs that I need to use all the time. I think this OS spin is a proof of concept, but it's an interesting one that could get traction, especially on vendor or corporate supported devices.

Quoting: STiATArch.. well, sweet spot there, pacman is probably the best one out there. I stopped using arch based distros due to their bad optional depend choices (if the software needs it for featurs it should not be optional, even if it is an option on compile, but there the paradigm of Arch and I have diffferent opinions).
If you are into using virtual machines or live USB sticks to test distros, you should try KaOS. They are not a fork of any other distro, however they use pacman for the package management tool! It has a good feel.

I know KaOS and Anke probably longer than most, we both have roots in Chakra. The x86_64 focus of them makes it impossible for me (still) to use it in a proper way. I understand her intention, and I do support it, but I can not use it as a daily driver, since I depend on i386 software for my daily work.
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