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Overkill drops Linux support for PAYDAY 2

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PAYDAY 2 came to Linux officially back in 2016 but as of today they've removed support for it, so it will no longer see updates on the Native Linux version.

They're also bringing the game to the Epic Games Store, although not exclusive, as it will remain on Steam and PAYDAY 3 will also be on Steam. As for why they're removing official Linux support they said this:

Note that Linux users will not receive this update or any following updates coming to PC. In addition, Linux players will be unable to matchmake with other PC clients following this update.
We tried to find a solution, but ultimately found it unfeasible due to the Linux version being on an older version of the PAYDAY 2 engine.

It does, however, still work quite well with the Windows version via Steam Play Proton on desktop Linux and is Steam Deck Verified against the Windows version in Proton. So while it's a loss of support for their Native build, it's still fully playable on Linux.

We've seen this a few times over the years, due to a mixture of reasons but the ultimate reason is pretty much the same as always — Linux and Steam Deck together hold a less than 2% user share on Steam. For many developers, right now, it's not worth the extra overhead to continue Native support until there's more of a market.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly. Find me on Mastodon.
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The absolutely only thing I mind is that, I feel, they could've stated that it does work via Proton.
Quoting: pleasereadthemanualIt seems Linux ports are treated more like charity work than anything else.

This is why I put my money where my mouth is and throw it at as much Linux stuff was possible. I bought 5 Steam Decks, a Valve Index, 5k-10k in GPUs and computer parts the last year or two.

I'm not attempting to flex, it's just that I can't think of another way to put a [ X ] big beacon on Linux.

Of course I bought Payday 2 for the Linux support, and now -- I guess they'll have to take a back seat and back burner for prioritizing my purchases (as such I'm not compelled or incentivized to buy Payday 3 just like I haven't purchased Serious Sam 4 -- as a matter or ethics and principle -- what is the draw when there are so many other pro-Linux choices for me to support?)

And so it goes. I wish them well, but make room for somebody else who values my money.
elmapul Jun 9
Quoting: slaapliedjeYou know what would be hilarious? If WSL2 and some Mac layer actually got to the point of being performant enough for gaming... and everyone just switched to doing Linux Native games, as they'd just work on Windows and Mac anyhow.

as things are moving the future looks more like:
driver developers start focusing more on WSL than linux (at least for the desktop hardware) we end up having more performance virtualizing linux than runing natively, linux aways having just an subset of windows games and being perceived as the inferior platform as an result, and even if someone made an game exclusively to linux so people dont feel like "why use this system if windows can do everything this can+ more", people would just use WSL to access the content.
elmapul Jun 9
Quoting: ElectricPrismAnyways -- this is more a problem with SaaS (Software as a Service) -- because it's not really clear what I'm buying when I spend money-- A Physical Copy -- Is a Physical Copy
i hate this mindset since an idiot told me that i need an physical copy of an software in order to "own" it...
in my opinion having the source code to an software and the right to use/modify/distribute worth much more than being able to just use it.
but no, according to him i need an physical copy of the software, in an cd or catridge format otherwise i dont own it...
Quoting: elmapul
Quoting: slaapliedjeYou know what would be hilarious? If WSL2 and some Mac layer actually got to the point of being performant enough for gaming... and everyone just switched to doing Linux Native games, as they'd just work on Windows and Mac anyhow.

as things are moving the future looks more like:
driver developers start focusing more on WSL than linux (at least for the desktop hardware) we end up having more performance virtualizing linux than runing natively, linux aways having just an subset of windows games and being perceived as the inferior platform as an result, and even if someone made an game exclusively to linux so people dont feel like "why use this system if windows can do everything this can+ more", people would just use WSL to access the content.
Ha, the problem is that performance of wsl2 is pretty trash. I am convinced it is sort of on purpose to give Windows users the perception Linux is slow for any GUI stuff.
Quoting: elmapul
Quoting: ElectricPrismAnyways -- this is more a problem with SaaS (Software as a Service) -- because it's not really clear what I'm buying when I spend money-- A Physical Copy -- Is a Physical Copy
i hate this mindset since an idiot told me that i need an physical copy of an software in order to "own" it...
in my opinion having the source code to an software and the right to use/modify/distribute worth much more than being able to just use it.
but no, according to him i need an physical copy of the software, in an cd or catridge format otherwise i dont own it...
I think the idea is that if you have a physical copy, you have access to install it at anytime. With digital platforms they could close down, or the internet goes out for a long period of time, etc.

Granted you have shit releases like Postal 3, which I bought a physical copy, but all it did was redownload the whole thing through Steam... so it took a long time to install off the two DVDs it came on, plus the time it took for my slow internet to refetch it all.
elmapul Jun 9
Quoting: slaapliedjeI think the idea is

there is no idea, the average joe knows jack shit about computers, he probably dont know what an source code is, or open source and call game modifications "mods" even if the mod was done with full source code access.
we dont call that mods, its "forks".

i own a few physical media games, and let me tell you, i dont know how to rip their content to save my life.
amatai Jun 9
I see some reader trying to make sense of not porting to Linux using a rentability computation. It makes zero sense, it will almost always be profitable to port on Linux for the extra copies sold for popular games.
But financial computation are all about RoI not profit anymore. From a RoI point of view, porting on Linux is not so interesting anymore.
Worse, assuming a marginal RoI computation, proton makes porting on Linux all the more uninteresting as there is still some copies sold on Linux with absolutely no cost.
While proton has been formidable for the Linux players it has given to company incentive on not caring about Linux.
Ardje Jun 9
I am actually just glad if they keep supporting proton.
The fact is: proton is the only middle ware that guarantees support for the next 20 years. Not because it acts like windows, in fact it doesn't. Unlike windows, proton guarantees a fixed API and bug compatibility.
None of my original Linux games still work, but their windows counter parts work without problems or patches on proton. And no, they don't work on windows 11 either.
The good thing about proton is this: you can implement any buggy windows API in proton that microsoft has made incompatible (as they do that a lot), but you can not implement that buggy windows API in the next windows release if you changed that API, because that would break new applications.
Eike Jun 9
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Quoting: ArdjeI am actually just glad if they keep supporting proton.
The fact is: proton is the only middle ware that guarantees support for the next 20 years. Not because it acts like windows, in fact it doesn't. Unlike windows, proton guarantees a fixed API and bug compatibility.
None of my original Linux games still work, but their windows counter parts work without problems or patches on proton. And no, they don't work on windows 11 either.

Well, I could hardly believe the situation with native Linux games is that bad, so I tried it on my side. I redownloaded and started the first 10 games I got for Linux on Steam, from late 2012 to mid 2013.(*) Every single one of them is running without problems and without any tinkering on my 2023 system.

(*) My PAYDAY: I got some new collectible cards. :D


Last edited by Eike on 9 June 2023 at 10:59 am UTC
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