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The long saga of Microsoft buying up Activision Blizzard took another step forward, with the UK Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) now consulting on remedies Microsoft put forward to address the CMA's concerns.

Something to be clear on though, is that it has not yet been approved. The CMA simply said that the changes Microsoft put down "opens the door to the deal being cleared". The main concerns from the CMA were on cloud gaming, so under the new plan Ubisoft will have the right to cloud gaming from Activision instead. From the CMA Press Release:

In contrast to the original deal, Microsoft will no longer control cloud gaming rights for Activision’s content, so would not be in a position to limit access to Activision’s key content to its own cloud gaming service or to withhold those games from rivals. Unlike the remedies the CMA previously rejected, Ubisoft will be free to offer Activision’s games both directly to consumers and to all cloud gaming service providers however it chooses, including for buy-to-play or multigame subscription services, or any new model for providing content that might emerge as the market develops. The deal with Ubisoft also requires Microsoft to port Activision games to operating systems other than Windows and support game emulators when requested, addressing the other main shortcoming with the previous remedies package.

When looking into fineprint on the decision, even Proton got mentioned:

Microsoft must port Activision Games to non-Windows OS following a request from Ubisoft. Ubisoft may also request that Microsoft perform technical modifications, including to ensure that the Activision Games support emulators like Proton. Microsoft must carry out this work at its regular pace and at a quality and standard which is customary in the gaming industry. Microsoft can only charge Ubisoft for the reasonable costs incurred for this work. Microsoft is also required to provide Ubisoft with development and porting plans for Activision Games reasonably in advance.

They called Proton an "emulator" though…best not to argue on what exactly Proton is right now.

Why would Ubisoft want Activision games to run well on Proton? Well, that depends who they would license the games to for streaming via cloud gaming (as that's what all this is about). Some cloud gaming providers that end up working with Ubisoft to provide Activision games might run their services on Linux systems.

However, the CMA are not entirely convinced just yet. As they said while it makes "important changes" they still have "limited residual concern" that Ubisoft's streaming rights could be "circumvented, terminated, or not enforced". So Microsoft has again offered remedies to ensure this can be enforced by the CMA.

There's now a consultation going on until October 6th on the proposed remedies so we should hear back sometime around then on the deal finally being approved or not. The final deadline is October 18th.

Microsoft's Brad Smith said on X: "We are encouraged by this positive development in the CMA’s review process. We presented solutions that we believe fully address the CMA’s remaining concerns related to cloud game streaming, and we will continue to work toward earning approval to close prior to the October 18 deadline."

Note: article updated 22/09/23 - 15:23 to include the note on Proton

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Microsoft, Misc
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly. Find me on Mastodon.
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benstor214 Sep 22, 2023
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Quoting: Loftyahh yes the thin illusionary veneer of the separation of corporation and state. i think there is a name for that but i can't quite remember..
Oh oh oh... I think it was some kind of Italian fashion! At the time, one individual designer was predominantly avant-garde. What was his name? Benito M.? It was very Italian sounding... like Tortelini? How do you say again for something that is in fashion? Can you say it's 'fashy'?
Theodis Sep 23, 2023
Quoting: poiuzWine devs call Wine an emulator. It does emulate Windows.

QuoteWine (originally an acronym for "Wine Is Not an Emulator") is a compatibility layer capable of running Windows applications on several POSIX-compliant operating systems, such as Linux, macOS, & BSD. Instead of simulating internal Windows logic like a virtual machine or emulator, Wine translates Windows API calls into POSIX calls on-the-fly, eliminating the performance and memory penalties of other methods and allowing you to cleanly integrate Windows applications into your desktop.
poiuz Sep 23, 2023
Quoting: Theodis
QuoteWine is often used as a recursive acronym, standing for “Wine Is Not an Emulator”. Sometimes it is also known to be used for “Windows Emulator”. In a way, both meanings are correct, only seen from different perspectives. The first meaning says that Wine is not a virtual machine, it does not emulate a CPU, and you are not supposed to install Windows nor any Windows device drivers on top of it; rather, Wine is an implementation of the Windows API, and can be used as a library to port Windows applications to Unix. The second meaning, obviously, is that to Windows binaries (.exe files), Wine does look like Windows, and emulates its behaviour and quirks rather closely.
ElectricPrism Sep 26, 2023
I wonder how much the militaries will pay Microsoft for performance report data of gamers to aid their induction and selection processes.

I could imagine that information would be valuable to them.
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