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Linux hits nearly 4% desktop user share on Statcounter

By - | Views: 73,662

According to Statcounter, which should be taken with a pinch of salt of course like any sampling, the Linux share on the desktop hit nearly 4% in December 2023. Last month was a record too and a clear trend over time, as going back a couple of years, it was rarely coming close to 2% but now it's repeatedly nearing 4% so it's quite a good sign overall.

The latest from Statcounter shows for all of 2023 below:

  • January - 2.91%
  • February - 2.94%
  • March - 2.85%
  • April - 2.83%
  • May - 2.7%
  • June - 3.07%
  • July - 3.12%
  • August - 3.18%
  • September - 3.02%
  • October - 2.92%
  • November - 3.22%
  • December - 3.82%

Looking at December it shows Windows rising too, with macOS dropping down. If we actually take ChromeOS directly into the Linux numbers for December 2023 the overall number would actually be 6.24% (ChromeOS is Linux after all).

Here's how just Linux looks over time on Statcounter since early 2009 until now:

Seems like a pretty clear trend over time don't you think? Nice to see this happening elsewhere, just like we've seen over years with the Steam Survey.

You can see their stats over here.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly. Find me on Mastodon.
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65 comments
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WorMzy Jan 3
Who makes up these percentages? People checking statcounter.com to see who's checking statcounter.com?
Quoting: CatKillerNope. Until last year ChromeOS the UI and ChromeOS the browser were exactly the same binary. The change last year to separate them was to make ChromeOS more Linux-like.

They dabbled with having web-apps-but-packaged-differently for a while but dropped that (as Google tends to do) a few years ago in favour of just-web-apps.
This is mind-boggling. And makes me all kinds of confused. I skimmed the Ars article at the time and figured it could only be good.

Is the Steam program for ChromeOS just some kind of weirdly packaged webapp pretending not to be a webapp? Can it not run normal binaries? What about CrossOver? On the one hand, so long as web environment integrity is not a thing, that's great for compatibility for all OSes. Rising tides and all that.

But why would you purposely GIMP your OS like that?? It's one thing to be web-first, but web-only is something else...

(with apologies to the current GIMP maintainers)

Quoting: CatKillerThe thing that ChromeOS can do that desktop Linux can't (but which Windows can) is run Android applications. But people generally don't think of Android (or Windows) as a desktop Linux OS.
I remember there being something that could do that on Linux. Waydroid?
Liam Dawe Jan 3
Quoting: WorMzyWho makes up these percentages? People checking statcounter.com to see who's checking statcounter.com?
Their stats code across 1.5+ million websites.
CatKiller Jan 3
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Quoting: pleasereadthemanualThis is mind-boggling. And makes me all kinds of confused. I skimmed the Ars article at the time and figured it could only be good.

Is the Steam program for ChromeOS just some kind of weirdly packaged webapp pretending not to be a webapp? Can it not run normal binaries? What about CrossOver? On the one hand, so long as web environment integrity is not a thing, that's great for compatibility for all OSes. Rising tides and all that.

But why would you purposely GIMP your OS like that?? It's one thing to be web-first, but web-only is something else...

(with apologies to the current GIMP maintainers)

Quoting: CatKillerThe thing that ChromeOS can do that desktop Linux can't (but which Windows can) is run Android applications. But people generally don't think of Android (or Windows) as a desktop Linux OS.
I remember there being something that could do that on Linux. Waydroid?

Quoting: CatKillerChromeOS has been able to run Linux applications in a container for around five years.
Quoting: CatKillerThe thing that ChromeOS can do that desktop Linux can't (but which Windows can) is run Android applications. But people generally don't think of Android (or Windows) as a desktop Linux OS.
Where did you get this info, wasn't difficult to get waydroid installed and working on my linux distro?
Quoting: CatKillerChromeOS has been able to run Linux applications in a container for around five years.
I know it can run Linux programs through a container, but this is kind of like Linux only being able to run programs in Wine. Like, there being no "native" Linux layer to write programs for. Which is so weird!

My understanding was that the Linux container thing was only for developers, and not for normal Chromebook users.


Last edited by pleasereadthemanual on 3 January 2024 at 1:53 pm UTC
Quoting: Liam Dawe
Quoting: WorMzyWho makes up these percentages? People checking statcounter.com to see who's checking statcounter.com?
Their stats code across 1.5+ million websites.
Interesting, definitely a small subset compared to every website and/or every computer and Linux is definitely lower if they do check just user agent as most privacy respecting browsers tend to use Windows useragent for less fingerprinting so in reality, it could very well be over 4% for either case.
CatKiller Jan 3
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Quoting: JordanPlayz158Where did you get this info, wasn't difficult to get waydroid installed and working on my linux distro?
Waydroid boots up Android in a container, and needs to be installed separately. As I understand it, neither of those are true for ChromeOS or Windows - they can run Android applications out of the box.
mad_mesa Jan 3
Quoting: CatKillerWho's habitually browsing websites on their Steam Deck?

The Big Picture interface, and the Steam Store interface are both effectively websites. It is also possible to click on external links within the store or the forum.

So if Steam is set up to contribute stats to statcounter at least for the public facing pages Deck users would be automatically showing up in large numbers from normal operation, and if not Deck would still not be entirely invisible.
buono Jan 3
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Quoting: Pengling
Quoting: buonoGonna have to start a new website - gamingonbsd soon.... :)
I know it's a joke, but I must admit I'm curious about the state of gaming on BSD - it's a subject that I know absolutely nothing about!

In the past I have tried freebsd, but quickly dropped it.

It looks like you can get steam going, and linux native games, but not much else from a linuxGamer point of view.

I'm sure there are a few here who dabble with it who might chime in.
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