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Prison Architect 2 from Double Eleven and Paradox Interactive was recently revealed with an entirely new look, and while the original has full Native Linux support, the sequel will not.

Apart from their main grand strategy games developed directly by Paradox, it seems they continue to move away from direct Linux support with all the other games now. Just like we saw with Cities Skylines 2, Star Trek: Infinite, The Lamplighters League and Age of Wonders 4.

Writing in an FAQ post on their official forum a Paradox staffer noted:

Will the game have Linux support? Will it be playable on the Steam Deck?

Prison Architect 2 is not supported for Linux. We are currently investigating Steam Deck Verification.

So if you want to play it on Linux or Steam Deck, you'll need Proton. Thankfully, Proton does run almost anything you throw at it nowadays, especially single-player games like this. Still, it's somewhat amusing for developers to not support Linux, but support (or look at supporting) the Steam Deck — which uses SteamOS Linux. But the Steam Deck is a dedicated known platform of course, compared to the many different desktop configurations of Linux. But again, Proton should run it just as well on Desktop Linux if it runs on Steam Deck.

Prison Architect 2 is due out on March 26th, and according to the FAQ it will be a "full-fledged game, with old and new features such as the Career mode, the Sandbox mode, and modding tools" and in regards to DLC which Paradox games are pretty notorious to have lots they said "post-launch content and DLCs are not our focus right now".

You can pre-order from:

Humble Store

Steam

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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const Feb 15
Quoting: STiATI think a middle ground would be good.

I don't mind playing on proton/dxvk, it's a stack to build on for Linux, I don't see it as more or less than that. I even switched to that for titles which actually do have native linux support since the native linux versions are so badly optimized and the games just run better on proton/dxvk.

I think they should consider actually supporting Proton/dxvk for their desktop builds and steam deck, that would be a middle ground I'd like to see.

I think the time for native builds is certainly over. DXVK got too good for that, and we have to give kudos to Philip Rebohle, Joshua-Ashton and all the other contributors for that. And Valve for sponsoring that work.

Most of the times I have issues with games it's rather proton related than dxvk related.

And proton/dxvk/steam runtime is a lot less volatile and diverse than the current linux world, so it makes sense.
I don't think the time for native builds is over. A well done native build, linked against a stable runtime, can perform much better then a proton version. What we don't need any more are lazy 3rd party ports with proprietary middle layers and ending support contracts. These have not aged well and were replaced by Proton.


Last edited by const on 15 February 2024 at 10:56 pm UTC
STiAT Feb 16
Quoting: const
Quoting: STiATI think a middle ground would be good.

I don't mind playing on proton/dxvk, it's a stack to build on for Linux, I don't see it as more or less than that. I even switched to that for titles which actually do have native linux support since the native linux versions are so badly optimized and the games just run better on proton/dxvk.

I think they should consider actually supporting Proton/dxvk for their desktop builds and steam deck, that would be a middle ground I'd like to see.

I think the time for native builds is certainly over. DXVK got too good for that, and we have to give kudos to Philip Rebohle, Joshua-Ashton and all the other contributors for that. And Valve for sponsoring that work.

Most of the times I have issues with games it's rather proton related than dxvk related.

And proton/dxvk/steam runtime is a lot less volatile and diverse than the current linux world, so it makes sense.
I don't think the time for native builds is over. A well done native build, linked against a stable runtime, can perform much better then a proton version. What we don't need any more are lazy 3rd party ports with proprietary middle layers and ending support contracts. These have not aged well and were replaced by Proton.

The time and effort which is required for that is a huge step. I don't see many developers or publishers going that route for not even 1 % of the playerbase, when they can do steam deck with proton/dxvk and minimal QA.

Let's agree to disagree on that one.
TheRiddick Feb 18
Emulation
Translation

Actually completely different things that attempt to get the same end result.
Translation has universally been better when possible.
tohur Feb 18
Quoting: TheRiddickEmulation
Translation

Actually completely different things that attempt to get the same end result.
Translation has universally been better when possible.

Wish folks would get that.. and understand due to translation games in proton ARE actually running native due to their api calls being translated to native linux calls and NOT emulated
dvd Feb 20
I bet there will be just enough native games to buy from.
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