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Fedora Linux 40 is officially out now

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Ready for some more upgrades? Today Fedora Linux 40 has now been officially released bringing with it big upgrades with GNOME 46, KDE Plasma 6 and lots more. Plus the usual assortment of upgrades and enhancements to all the core applications.

With this release you're getting Linux kernel 6.8, Mesa 24.0.5, Wayland out of the box for the KDE edition, the inclusion of PyTorch for deep learning, numerous security improvements and so much more across the bump in versions of KDE and GNOME with all the enhancements there like improved HDR support in Plasma, experimental Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) in GNOME and so on.

They also revived the Fedora Atomic Desktops branding which includes Fedora Silverblue, Fedora Kinoite, Fedora Sway Atomic and Fedora Budgie Atomic. So if you fancy a different type of Linux distribution perhaps give those a try that use either ostree or image-based provisioning that the Fedora team say isn't really "immutable" so it's being clearer going forward.

See more in the release announcement. And you can see the overview of changes for Fedora Workstation and Fedora KDE.

You might also want to read the interesting blog post titled "Notifications in 46 and beyond", which goes over the work involved in improving notifications in GNOME thanks to funding from the Sovereign Tech Fund.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly. Find me on Mastodon.
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What distribution you will advice for gaming?
From my experience, a good Linux distribution for gaming will be a distribution that will provide all packages needed for gaming:
- Proprietary and open source graphic drivers
- recent kernel
- wifi/bluetooth drivers
- wine/wine-staging
- 32 and 64 bits libraries
- Steam
- all emulators
- flatpak
- Lutris, Heroic...
- Gamescope, Mangohud
which manages dependencies efficiently: for example, if I install Lutris, also install wine, the 32 and 64 bit libraries, install the sdl libraries etc... So that the user subsequently does not have any messages error linked to a missing library when launching his games. And packages should be updated regularly.

At the moment I have successfully tested the following distributions for the game:
- Manjaro (ARCH)
- openSUSE Tumbleweed

This two distributions are rolling release so you always use recent and stable packages.

As an Ubuntu user for many years, I would not recommend this Linux distribution for gaming, I have experienced a lot of problems with unsatisfied dependencies, app packages not available, issues unresolved and its management of PPAs is complicated and degrades its stability.
Then I often encountered difficulties when updating from one version to another.


What about Fedora? I would be interested in your feedback.


Last edited by legluondunet on 23 April 2024 at 3:31 pm UTC
rapakiv Apr 23
Quoting: legluondunetAt the moment I have successfully tested the following distributions for the game:
- Manjaro (ARCH)
- openSUSE Tumbleweed

This two distributions are rolling release so you always use recent and stable packages.

You just said good things about Manjaro, bunker yourself, you are to be bombed.

Any distribution will work, but some will give a lot of trouble to get there, just take the easy path and those two are perfectly good options.
Quoting: legluondunetWhat distribution you will advice for gaming?
Not Mint. I love Mint, I use Mint, but Mint is not a serious gaming platform--all its stuff is old, and although I'm sure there are ways to make all the relevant stuff be up to date it's probably a pain. Luckily for me I don't play the kind of game that needs you to be up to the minute.
tfk Apr 23
I've always used Fedora. Never had a reason to switch. That's why I can't give any advice on other distro's. As I never gamed on those.
kerossin Apr 23
Quoting: legluondunetWhat about Fedora? I would be interested in your feedback.

Haven't used Fedora in a while but it should be good also. It's what I would call semi-rolling - some packages like the kernel get updated for the same OS version and the OS releases don't take that long (I think every 6 months there's a new Fedora version).
GetBeaned Apr 23
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: legluondunetWhat distribution you will advice for gaming?
Not Mint. I love Mint, I use Mint, but Mint is not a serious gaming platform--all its stuff is old, and although I'm sure there are ways to make all the relevant stuff be up to date it's probably a pain. Luckily for me I don't play the kind of game that needs you to be up to the minute.

Genuine question: what issues would you run into using Mint? Mint is really the only distro I've used since coming from Windows and I haven't had any issues, though I stick almost exclusively to single player stuff if that's what you're referring to.

The only remotely gaming related issue I've had with Mint is that GOverlay's interface is unreadable.
tuubi Apr 23
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Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: legluondunetWhat distribution you will advice for gaming?
Not Mint. I love Mint, I use Mint, but Mint is not a serious gaming platform--all its stuff is old, and although I'm sure there are ways to make all the relevant stuff be up to date it's probably a pain. Luckily for me I don't play the kind of game that needs you to be up to the minute.
I run a fresh kernel and the latest stable Mesa from a PPA, but I don't see why games would care about anything else. I suppose one might want to play around with gamescope and Wayland etc, and you'll get the new bells and whistles quicker on some other distro, but no game actually requires that stuff as far as I know. I think Mint is a perfectly fine distro for most gamers.
ToddL Apr 23
Quoting: legluondunetWhat distribution you will advice for gaming?
From my experience, a good Linux distribution for gaming will be a distribution that will provide all packages needed for gaming:
- Proprietary and open source graphic drivers
- recent kernel
- wifi/bluetooth drivers
- wine/wine-staging
- 32 and 64 bits libraries
- Steam
- all emulators
- flatpak
- Lutris, Heroic...
- Gamescope, Mangohud
which manages dependencies efficiently: for example, if I install Lutris, also install wine, the 32 and 64 bit libraries, install the sdl libraries etc... So that the user subsequently does not have any messages error linked to a missing library when launching his games. And packages should be updated regularly.

At the moment I have successfully tested the following distributions for the game:
- Manjaro (ARCH)
- openSUSE Tumbleweed

This two distributions are rolling release so you always use recent and stable packages.

As an Ubuntu user for many years, I would not recommend this Linux distribution for gaming, I have experienced a lot of problems with unsatisfied dependencies, app packages not available, issues unresolved and its management of PPAs is complicated and degrades its stability.
Then I often encountered difficulties when updating from one version to another.


What about Fedora? I would be interested in your feedback.

I was going to suggest trying Bazzite, Nobara or ChimeraOS but not sure if they fit the criteria you posted.
serious96 Apr 23
Quoting: legluondunetWhat distribution you will advice for gaming?
From my experience, a good Linux distribution for gaming will be a distribution that will provide all packages needed for gaming:
- Proprietary and open source graphic drivers
- recent kernel
- wifi/bluetooth drivers
- wine/wine-staging
- 32 and 64 bits libraries
- Steam
- all emulators
- flatpak
- Lutris, Heroic...
- Gamescope, Mangohud
which manages dependencies efficiently: for example, if I install Lutris, also install wine, the 32 and 64 bit libraries, install the sdl libraries etc... So that the user subsequently does not have any messages error linked to a missing library when launching his games. And packages should be updated regularly.

At the moment I have successfully tested the following distributions for the game:
- Manjaro (ARCH)
- openSUSE Tumbleweed

This two distributions are rolling release so you always use recent and stable packages.

As an Ubuntu user for many years, I would not recommend this Linux distribution for gaming, I have experienced a lot of problems with unsatisfied dependencies, app packages not available, issues unresolved and its management of PPAs is complicated and degrades its stability.
Then I often encountered difficulties when updating from one version to another.


What about Fedora? I would be interested in your feedback.

i think there are three distros that fit gaming requirement like that (based on fedora) chimera os, nobara, and bazzite. i personally use bazzite with legion go. as a user that want the os to just work without much change or no change at all at the root file system, immutable os is really great. since if there is a problem i can just rollback to the previous working date build. the downside is every update or rollback need to download full os size file.
Linux_Rocks Apr 23
I remember when Fedora 3 came out. Back then I had dial-up unfortunately and had to buy the CDs off eBay for cheap. I ran it on a Pentium II 266MHz with 384MB of RAM and on-board ATI RAGE 128 graphics. It was a quad-boot machine with Windows 2000 Professional, FreeDOS (with OpenGEM), Fedora Linux, and FreeBSD. GNOME in Linux, and KDE in FreeBSD. I used GAG as my boot manager too. lol

Also, Mint is perfectly fine with gaming. Just use the Edge version, and add the Ubuntu drivers repo directly if you use an Nvidia card.
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