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Remember Playtron and PlaytronOS? They made an attempt at a big splash recently with plans to create a Linux-powered system to rival SteamOS (Steam Deck) and Windows across various devices and multiple stores. The first device has been announced and it's some weird web3 thing.

I should note, Playtron's CEO offered some details before the announcement, but didn't actually follow-up on providing me with anything. So I'm simply going by what has been announced and the seemingly official page for it is mostly blank, with just a newsletter sign up box.

It was announced at Sui Basecamp (Sui being a Web3 blockchain company) with the reveal from Mysten Labs. According to Sui it's called the SuiPlay0x1 and it will be released in 2025. As noted on X (formerly Twitter): "SuiPlay0X1 runs Playtron's device-agnostic gaming operating system, enabling gamers to play both Web3 and Web2 games across PC and mobile."

And uh, it looks apparently like this:

Picture credit: Sui/Mysten Labs/Playtron

Those sticks and d-pad look rather terrible don't think? Why is it so flat? That does not look comfortable to game with. GamesBeat have some more details, noting it will have "native Sui blockchain integration via zkLogin and Sui Kiosk SDKs, enabling asset ownership directly connected to a device’s account system for the first time in the gaming industry" and it might cost somewhere around $500 and while it seems to have deep integration with Sui blockchain stuff, it will support other stores too. Doesn't seem like any technical specifications have been given out yet.

So if blockchain web3 stuff is your jam, then you might be interested in this I guess? Not one for me honestly.

Until Playtron actually get some agreements to be on more…normal devices, I don't really see it going anywhere. At least once they eventually release the first public builds of the Linux-based PlaytronOS we might see what they're really up to.

What are your thoughts? Let me know in the comments.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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tarmo888 Apr 16
Quoting: Philadelphus
Quoting: tarmo888NFTs enable securely buy/sell your items on secondary markets without an intermediate, the blockchain is just a permissionless distributed database. Steam is against this because they don't want the items traded on secondary markets, they want you be vendor-locked to their platform.
This is where I tend to get lost when I try to connect theory to practice. In theory, it sounds great. In practice…what secondary markets exist between games? If I buy some ultra-deluxe Pokéball in Pokémon: Crypto & Currency edition, I can't exactly use it in Call of Duty, nor can I take a sniper rifle into Stardew Valley. I can certainly imagine horrible cash-grab cross-overs where you buy like a skin in one game and another game allows you to use it there, but that's quite superficial, and merely requires coordination and cooperation between the games involved, not a blockchain per se.

Secondary market doesn't mean "same item implemented in multiple games. Secondary market means the same item sold it multiple markets.

Traditionally, in order to sell your CS skins, you would need to sell it on primary market or send them to escrow account who handles the sale. Worst case, you would beed to sell your whole account to sell one item.

With distributed ledger and smart-contracts, you can have the item in your wallet and have a sale listing on multiple secondary markets without the need of escrow.
Eike Apr 16
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Quoting: tarmo888
Quoting: Eike
Quoting: tarmo888Many won't understand NFTs until Steam removes trading cards (their ToS allows them to do it).

Ok, let's play through this: Steam removes trading cards. You've got a signature somewhere in a blockchain that one of many million of those cards is yours. What now? I sure won't buy it from you, because... what would it do for me? I can't show it in my profile, I can't make a set, I cannot do anything with it! Neither can you. So... what?

You might not be able to show it on your Steam profile, but any website could read the data from blockchain and display them. That's even if Steam removed it from their API.

Yeah, but... why? I can display anything in my browser at any time. Without a block chain. And without any website either.
And I'm not buying trading cards to admire their looks to begin with.


Last edited by Eike on 16 April 2024 at 12:42 pm UTC
tarmo888 Apr 16
Quoting: LupertEverett
Quoting: tarmo888Many won't understand NFTs until Steam removes trading cards (their ToS allows them to do it). People need to lose something before they start looking for alternative solutions. I am sometimes surprised how slow this process is, even when free-to-play online servers get closed left and right and people losing everything they spent on micro-transactions.

Fun fact, Valve's flop Artifact still has trading cards, but none of them load because the images are only on Steam servers. Images of properly done NFTs are stored on IPFS (torrent like filesystem accessible via web gateways).

Just like the countless NFTs that had their image links have long expired... Lmfao.

Literally all NFTs are doing is to store a link to an image on somewhere... that may not keep working forever.

https://www.theverge.com/2021/3/25/22349242/nft-metadata-explained-art-crypto-urls-links-ipfs

http://web.archive.org/web/20230620174607/https://twitter.com/0xkofi/status/1664556455515635713

I love it when cryptobros shill their so called "improvement" when it actually doesn't solve anything *at best*.

Would you be surprised to know that Verge doesn't know what they are writing about? IPFS works like a torrent, so anyone who downloads the assets could also seed them if needed because the URL is unique to content hash. If a traditional URL goes down, there is nothing you can do other than hope the domain becomes available so, you could fix the broken links.

Since IPFS not mandatory for NFTs, there will be many NFTs that still use traditional URLs that can broke.
Quoting: tarmo888
Quoting: LupertEverett
Quoting: tarmo888Many won't understand NFTs until Steam removes trading cards (their ToS allows them to do it). People need to lose something before they start looking for alternative solutions. I am sometimes surprised how slow this process is, even when free-to-play online servers get closed left and right and people losing everything they spent on micro-transactions.

Fun fact, Valve's flop Artifact still has trading cards, but none of them load because the images are only on Steam servers. Images of properly done NFTs are stored on IPFS (torrent like filesystem accessible via web gateways).

Just like the countless NFTs that had their image links have long expired... Lmfao.

Literally all NFTs are doing is to store a link to an image on somewhere... that may not keep working forever.

https://www.theverge.com/2021/3/25/22349242/nft-metadata-explained-art-crypto-urls-links-ipfs

http://web.archive.org/web/20230620174607/https://twitter.com/0xkofi/status/1664556455515635713

I love it when cryptobros shill their so called "improvement" when it actually doesn't solve anything *at best*.

Would you be surprised to know that Verge doesn't know what they are writing about? IPFS works like a torrent, so anyone who downloads the assets could also seed them if needed because the URL is unique to content hash. If a traditional URL goes down, there is nothing you can do other than hope the domain becomes available so, you could fix the broken links.

Since IPFS not mandatory for NFTs, there will be many NFTs that still use traditional URLs that can broke.

Sooooo... that's a roundabout way of saying NFTs don't solve the problem you're claiming them to solve. Got it.

The scenario you described assumes that people will keep "seeding" it forever, and lemme tell you, torrents don't keep up forever either. Once you're down to 0 seeders, you're screwed. A cryptobro "reinvented" version of it will behave exactly the same here, only with more wasting of electricity. :V

Edit: Took a bit of a time to research what IPFS is all about and I'd like to take my last word back. It doesn't seem to have any relations to any crypto "invention".

Still, the point stands. You can still lose the file, just like in torrents. And you still buy *a link to somewhere* with an NFT.

Also just noticed that you mentioned "so anyone who downloads the assets" as if one thing the NFTs got meme'd on wasn't the "right click and save" thing lmao. Here they can do it without right clicking at all, that's even more convenient!


Last edited by LupertEverett on 18 April 2024 at 7:19 pm UTC
Quoting: tarmo888
Quoting: Philadelphus
Quoting: tarmo888NFTs enable securely buy/sell your items on secondary markets without an intermediate, the blockchain is just a permissionless distributed database. Steam is against this because they don't want the items traded on secondary markets, they want you be vendor-locked to their platform.
This is where I tend to get lost when I try to connect theory to practice. In theory, it sounds great. In practice…what secondary markets exist between games? If I buy some ultra-deluxe Pokéball in Pokémon: Crypto & Currency edition, I can't exactly use it in Call of Duty, nor can I take a sniper rifle into Stardew Valley. I can certainly imagine horrible cash-grab cross-overs where you buy like a skin in one game and another game allows you to use it there, but that's quite superficial, and merely requires coordination and cooperation between the games involved, not a blockchain per se.

Secondary market doesn't mean "same item implemented in multiple games. Secondary market means the same item sold it multiple markets.
I see! Thanks for the clarification.
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