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Ubuntu 24.04 LTS (Noble Numbat) Beta released

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Canonical is gearing up for the release of the next LTS (long term support) version of Ubuntu, with a first Beta now available for Ubuntu 24.04 LTS (Noble Numbat).

While the Beta is not intended for production use the developers said that the Beta is "known to be reasonably free of showstopper image build or installer bugs, while representing a very recent snapshot of 24.04 LTS that should be representative of the features intended to ship with the final release expected on April 25, 2024".

For gamers, you'll be pleased to know this release ships with the vm.max_map_count value boosted to 1048576, which is needed for certain games to run, this matches up with Fedora and now Arch Linux too.

A Games page has also been added to the Ubuntu App Center, the mail app Thunderbird version 115 has been moved to a Snap package, GNOME upgraded to version 46, you also get Firefox 124 and LibreOffice 24.2 and various upgrades to other included software like Pipewire 1.04. You're also getting kernel 6.8 as standard.

Pictured - Ubuntu 24.04 LTS (Noble Numbat) Beta

There's a few app changes too like the default install only being "minimal", but you can select "extended selection" to have stuff like LibreOffice and Thunderbird installed. GNOME Snapshot replaces Cheese for webcams and Games are no longer installed by default. Various improvements to the look and feel of their Flutter-based installer too with it being more customizable.

Plenty of security improvements have been implemented too like some tweaks to the Ubuntu kernel to restrict the use of unprivileged user namespaces, TLS 1.0, 1.1 and DTLS 1.0 are forcefully disabled, they said that packages are now "built with security-hardening features which stop many undiscovered security vulnerabilities, rendering them unexploitable" and more.

Various other upgrades included too like GCC 14, Python 3.12, OpenJDK 21, LLVM 18, Rust 1.75, Golang 1.22 and .NET 8.

Ubuntu 24.04 is also the first LTS release that supports the Raspberry Pi 5 with both arm64 server and desktop images.

Ubuntu 24.04 LTS will be supported for 5 years until June 2029. 

You can find the downloads on the Ubuntu website. Release notes on their forum.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly. Find me on Mastodon.
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13 comments
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Serg86 Apr 16
I have a 7 year old laptop which had Ubuntu 23.10 on it up until a week ago. I then installed NixOS on it with Plasma 6 (Wayland) and my battery life, what feels like doubled... Performance has also been absolutely amazing. I don't game on it or anything else requiring a lot of performance, but online video viewing like YouTube and Rumble, some light programming (compiling) and other office type tasks have all performed better than on Ubuntu (Gnome) and again, the battery life is just mindblowing.

No idea if it's Plasma 6, NixOS, Ubuntu being bloated or what have you but I absolutely love it.
Boldos Apr 16
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Happy Ubuntu user for more that a decade here
For both business (Ubuntu being my main daily workload driver) and pleasure (anything non-job related, incl. gaming of course).

I just cannot wait to get migrated to the new 24.04 LTS
Nevu_ Apr 16
Quoting: BoldosHappy Ubuntu user for more that a decade here
For both business (Ubuntu being my main daily workload driver) and pleasure (anything non-job related, incl. gaming of course).

I just cannot wait to get migrated to the new 24.04 LTS

How are you liking Ubuntu these days? Been thinking of making it my main distro after all these years despite the community saying Mint and Pop are just better. I don't know - Ubuntu feels comfy and I enjoy their default GNOME setup. But some will have you believe that Ubuntu is worse than Microsoft due to past mishaps and the current snap packaging system.
Quoting: Nevu_
Quoting: BoldosHappy Ubuntu user for more that a decade here
For both business (Ubuntu being my main daily workload driver) and pleasure (anything non-job related, incl. gaming of course).

I just cannot wait to get migrated to the new 24.04 LTS

How are you liking Ubuntu these days? Been thinking of making it my main distro after all these years despite the community saying Mint and Pop are just better. I don't know - Ubuntu feels comfy and I enjoy their default GNOME setup.
Well, IMO Mint is just better. But if you like Gnome maybe not, because Mint doesn't do Gnome, it does Cinnamon or Mate instead. Smooth but fairly old fashioned interfaces. I personally like that because I feel like a lot of the desktop environment innovations that have been introduced over the last 20 years were solutions in search of problems, or novelty for the sake of differentiation, rather than things that actually made it easier for me to use a computer. But if you prefer newer approaches you might not like Mint.
Pengling Apr 16
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Quoting: Purple Library Guyit does Cinnamon or Mate instead
Hey, don't forget us Xfce guys!

Quoting: Purple Library GuyWell, IMO Mint is just better. But if you like Gnome maybe not, because Mint doesn't do Gnome, it does Cinnamon or Mate instead. Smooth but fairly old fashioned interfaces. I personally like that because I feel like a lot of the desktop environment innovations that have been introduced over the last 20 years were solutions in search of problems, or novelty for the sake of differentiation, rather than things that actually made it easier for me to use a computer. But if you prefer newer approaches you might not like Mint.
Anyway, I've gotta second you, here - in my opinion also, Mint is just better. It smooths out all the little irritants that I ran into over many many years of using Xubuntu (which I used for most of my Linux-using life, until last year) that for some reason never got addressed, and it's just all the more seamless and not just user-friendly but user-focussed. Mint Xfce is like Xubuntu without the papercuts.

But yeah, that's not gonna help if you prefer GNOME.


Last edited by Pengling on 16 April 2024 at 10:27 pm UTC
Linux_Rocks Apr 16
Not sure why, but at first glance I thought it said "Noble Numbnuts" for some reason. XD
For me, Ubuntu and anything Ubuntu-based just feels archaic. I've hopped on the NixOS and Universal Blue (Bazzite and Bluefin/Aurora primarily) train, and nowadays I can just define my system through a config file. uBlue goes even further with enabling creating whole distro image and ISOs with all of my configs in it.

I haven't needed to think about system updates in a while. Even in the case of something having a problem, I haven't needed to worry about anything breaking. When I saw Matt from The Linux Cast talking about reinstalling your distro to have a clean experience, I outright found it cavemen-like because... why not just check what's layered in `rpm-ostree status` and then re-layer what's necessary after an `rpm-ostree reset` (assuming you even layer anything, instead of adding things declaratively in your Blue Build image creator github repo).

Mind, I still need to do `cd ~/.config/home-manager ; nix flake update ; home-manager switch -b bak ; distrobox enter arch -- paru -Syyu --skipreview --noconfirm` every now and then (really need to make that a script file in my home-manager), but that's like... maaaybe if I feel like it? And doesn't impact my main system. I don't know, my current setup allows me to not really think about the underlying system I have, and anything else that I have to actively manage feels like a downgrade.

Oh, and I use KDE, I guess. Not that it really matters, changing DE is just an `rpm-ostree rebase` or a single line change in NixOS config away. It was a bit of a heavy learning at first, but it was well worth the time investment IMHO.
GBGames Apr 17
Quoting: fenglengshunFor me, Ubuntu and anything Ubuntu-based just feels archaic. I've hopped on the NixOS and Universal Blue (Bazzite and Bluefin/Aurora primarily) train, and nowadays I can just define my system through a config file. uBlue goes even further with enabling creating whole distro image and ISOs with all of my configs in it.

I have been using Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and planned to upgrade to 22.04 LTS when I was done with a project (and maybe by the time I am done I just go to 24.04 LTS). I have not heard of NixOS, but it sounds kinda awesome?

It sounds like they took the idea of DevOps and applied it to your personal operating system.

I'm not sure if I'll make time to learn it and might just stick with Ubuntu, but thanks for bringing it to my awareness.


Last edited by GBGames on 17 April 2024 at 11:51 am UTC
F.Ultra Apr 17
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Quoting: Nevu_
Quoting: BoldosHappy Ubuntu user for more that a decade here
For both business (Ubuntu being my main daily workload driver) and pleasure (anything non-job related, incl. gaming of course).

I just cannot wait to get migrated to the new 24.04 LTS

How are you liking Ubuntu these days? Been thinking of making it my main distro after all these years despite the community saying Mint and Pop are just better. I don't know - Ubuntu feels comfy and I enjoy their default GNOME setup. But some will have you believe that Ubuntu is worse than Microsoft due to past mishaps and the current snap packaging system.

People often writes the most insane things and makes mountains out of molehills. While I personally would like everything to still be a DEB or RPM there really isn't much difference for an end user if a package is a Snap or not, that question is completely blown out of the water. Yes initially Snaps took a long time to load, but in 20.04 that changed and e.g Firefox loads under a second for me.
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