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Rogue Voltage takes the idea of roguelikes and deck-builders and spins it into something incredible clever with a little engineering involving lots of wires. Note: key provided by the developer.

Here your deck is a backpack full of modules you build up during a run. You wire up power to modules to do everything from healing to attacking and more. The idea is just so refreshing and clever since there's a lot of room for all kinds of crazy combinations and over-powered chain reactions. It feels almost like a Zachtronics puzzle game turned into a roguelike.

Even though it can get just a tad complicated, it's still pretty accessible. I'm not particularly smart with this kind of stuff and yet I've been having a blast. Your backpack isn't exactly large, so there's not an overly ridiculous amount of things going on. Although, that said, there's multiple characters too, and what you do with all these wired up modules often needs to work in tandem across different turns to take down all those nasty creatures. With how many different combos there are, and I'm barely scratching the surface of getting good at it, there's going to be plenty of room for the developer to keep expanding on the idea.

Another clever feature is the timeline. The battles are based on turns but with your modules you can push people around on the timeline. There's just so many little strategies to find and use to your advantage here.

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There's some really funny and surprising mechanics going on here.

At one point early on, which really made me appreciate the game and caused my brain to demand I play more, was an enemy throwing a Time Bomb at me. In six steps on the timeline it would explode, dealing damage to both characters. However, I could stick it in one of my backpacks, and wire up some power into it to reduce the damage. However, energy is precious. You have only a small amount (at least to start with). So you really have to think up a good strategy here to balance attacking, defending, building up some extra energy to unleash combos and more.

Rogue Voltage has a number of curious features like that.

In the case above, I was quite lucky. I had an Amplifier module I picked up from a previous encounter so I could double the 1 energy from the Generator, and then feed that into the Time Bomb therefore destroying it in a single step on the timeline. And leave my other character to attack the enemy. Nice.

You know it's really frustrating lately. There's too many games like this appearing that are just so damn good. I need a clone to work so I can play them all. Or maybe a time machine, so I can play Rogue Voltage for hours and hours and then go back in time to do some work. This is easily one of the best ideas for a game I've played so far this year.

The developer, Horizont Computergrafik, is a new Berlin-based studio with a background in simulation and visualization software. Rogue Voltage's unique wiring mechanics are inspired by music production with modular synthesizers. With the game currently in Early Access they said it's expected to stay there for around 1 year as they have plans to add in more characters, modules, play-styles and meta-progression.

It has Native Linux support that works perfectly on Kubuntu 24.04, and the developer said the build has been optimized for the Steam Deck.

Available to purchase on Steam. There's also a demo available which I seriously urge you to try.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
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9 comments

scaine May 10
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Well, since I've put hundreds of hours into Backpack Hero, I guess this is an insta-buy from me! Looking forward to giving it a shot later!
Salvatos May 10
I’m glad there’s a demo because this looks like it might be a bit too technical for me but I’m still quite intrigued and willing to try it out.
Liam Dawe May 10
Quoting: SalvatosI’m glad there’s a demo because this looks like it might be a bit too technical for me but I’m still quite intrigued and willing to try it out.
The good thing about this is you can take your time. It's turn-based along the timeline and the tutorial sets it up for you quite nicely.
Kuirbabz May 11
Why they looked like obi-wan kenobi and anakin skywalker? Why this feels amazing?
Romlok May 11
Note that the native Linux demo is currently broken, in that the wrong Steam depot is connected so that we get the Windows files instead. Classic "missing executable"! 🤦
Liam Dawe May 11
Quoting: RomlokNote that the native Linux demo is currently broken, in that the wrong Steam depot is connected so that we get the Windows files instead. Classic "missing executable"! 🤦
Should be fixed now, was wrongly tagged as Steam Deck only.
Romlok May 11
Quoting: Liam DaweShould be fixed now, was wrongly tagged as Steam Deck only.
Unfortunately not, the behaviour remains the same for now. Even Steam Deck people were reporting having to run the demo through Proton. 😕

I've been in conversation with the dev on the Steam forums, and they're apparently a bit swamped right now, but say they'll look into it at some point because they want to get Deck Verified and whatnot.

I mentioned this in the Steam thread, but since the full version apparently works, my personal theory is it's because the demo's Windows depot (whose ID comes first numerically) isn't tagged as being Windows-specific, so Steam is just delivering that to everyone, ignoring the other depot.

See https://steamdb.info/app/2317800/depots/ (demo) vs https://steamdb.info/app/1494560/depots/ (full game)

But I haven't even seen the inside of Steamworks yet, so it's just a guess. 🤷
Liam Dawe May 12
I explained the issue to them, it actually *should* be solved for the demo now.
Romlok May 12
Quoting: Liam DaweI explained the issue to them, it actually *should* be solved for the demo now.
Confirmed! 🎉
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