You can sign up to get a daily email of our articles, see the Mailing List page!
Support us on Patreon to keep GamingOnLinux alive. This ensures we have no timed articles and no paywalls. Just good, fresh content! Alternatively, you can donate through Paypal, Flattr and Liberapay!

Seems like there's no hope for BattlEye support within Steam Play

Posted by , | Views: 9,488

With Valve and Easy Anti-Cheat in talks to get EAC supported within Steam Play, many readers asked about BattlEye as it's another anti-cheat solution blocking games actually working with Steam Play on Linux. I now have an answer on that.

I had a chat with the team at BattlEye and the result was basically this:

Unfortunately we can only support Linux if the respective game natively does so.

So there you have it. Titles like DayZ and PLAYERUNKNOWN'S BATTLEGROUNDS and many others are likely to never be fully playable on Linux with Steam Play. To be clear, I would love to be wrong of that of course. However, without the direct support of BattlEye, any progress towards it could be constantly broken any time it's tweaked and that's not a great situation to be in.

Since BattlEye does support Linux with native releases, if we want any title that makes use of it they're going to need to bring the game to Linux officially for now. For that to actually happen though, the elephant in the room is obviously the market share situation and how a lot of these developers don't see it as being worthwhile to do.

I've mentioned numerous times that such multiplayer titles will be a sore spot for Steam Play and it's likely to continue to be so for some time. At least, until we see the talks between Valve and EAC result in something.

There's also the new "Steam Trust" system Valve announced in January, as part of some changes coming to Steam. If developers end up using that (or EAC if it's eventually supported) then things for Steam Play may get better.

29 Likes, Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG and Humble Store. See more information here.
28 comments
Page: «3/3
  Go to:

const 13 March 2019 at 9:58 pm UTC
ElectricPrismThe ELI5 from a developer perspective (Player Unknown) probably looks like this.

Everyone has a maximum of 8-12 hours in a day where they could work.

They're already slammed with requests from users and problems to fix to keep the wheels running.

With the existing success of the game, why should they divert their very limited resources away from making sure the existing playerbase sustains.

Anyone that has ever owned a large business knows how tricky it is to bring in new human resources, and how ineffective, inefficient, and costly problem identification, and resolution can be. It's really easy to bite off more than you can chew.

With enough player demand though, their priorities can and do change.

This is just one of many reasons developers/studios/publishers may decide to not support linux. Remember there are documented games that were ported to but never released on linux.

But for middleware, the situation is very much different. Especially AntiCheat software seems to be quite competing, there's no AntiCheat software with a near monopolic state currently. So each dev has to decide which AntiCheat he's going to use. Even 1% customers make a difference in such a choice. It may only take a couple game devs telling them they chose EAC because of Linux support for them to reconsider.
Orkultus 14 March 2019 at 1:24 am UTC
So i guess we just keep demanding Native Linux Ports.
einherjar 14 March 2019 at 9:25 am UTC
Xaero_VincentEAC-enabled multiplayer games may bring up the resurgence of GPU passthrough tech for Linux users until Wine & Proton have solid support for EAC. It's still a thing for the less purist Linux gamers open to using a Windows VM and a passed AMD or Nvidia GPU + Looking Glass.

I've personally had success running EAC-enabled games with the easy-to-use Intel GVT passthrough tech:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95sLF_tLdWQ


How did you exactly do that? I tried to run a Win8.1 Pro with GPU Passthrough - but didn't work.
Do I need a second GPU for that, or can I just give the GPU to the VM?

Would be nice for my son - he wants to play Fortnite, but doesnt run on Ubuntu...


Last edited by einherjar at 14 March 2019 at 9:26 am UTC
gradyvuckovic 14 March 2019 at 9:33 am UTC
Has anyone ever tried creating a 'virtual GPU' for GPU passthrough?

As in, it appears like a GPU to Linux, but it's actually just software, and is passing internally all the requests put on it to another GPU on the system seamlessly.

That way you wouldn't need a second GPU for GPU passthrough. Performance shouldn't suffer too much either right?

For that matter, has anyone ever tried creating a 'gaming VM' application? Think VirtualBox, only stripped down and designed just for loading Windows onto it, doing GPU passthrough, and Steam Link streaming to the host Linux PC?

I can imagine an application where it pops up with a wizard, asks you for a Windows ISO, a valid Windows license key, your steam user account and password, and a 'setup' button. Then behind the scenes it loads the Windows ISO, runs through the setup on automode, automatically activates Windows, installs Steam and signs in for you, all hidden behind a progress bar, and when it's done Linux Steam would pop up with something like 'Windows VM is ready to stream!'.


Last edited by gradyvuckovic at 14 March 2019 at 9:36 am UTC
Xaero_Vincent 14 March 2019 at 8:35 pm UTC
einherjar
Xaero_VincentEAC-enabled multiplayer games may bring up the resurgence of GPU passthrough tech for Linux users until Wine & Proton have solid support for EAC. It's still a thing for the less purist Linux gamers open to using a Windows VM and a passed AMD or Nvidia GPU + Looking Glass.

I've personally had success running EAC-enabled games with the easy-to-use Intel GVT passthrough tech:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95sLF_tLdWQ


How did you exactly do that? I tried to run a Win8.1 Pro with GPU Passthrough - but didn't work.
Do I need a second GPU for that, or can I just give the GPU to the VM?

Would be nice for my son - he wants to play Fortnite, but doesnt run on Ubuntu...

GVT-g is shared GPU passthrough, meaning only 1 GPU but it's only the Intel graphics that is supported. But recent Intel graphics is good enough for Fortnite.

What is the specs of the machine?
einherjar 15 March 2019 at 5:11 pm UTC
Xaero_Vincent
einherjar
Xaero_VincentEAC-enabled multiplayer games may bring up the resurgence of GPU passthrough tech for Linux users until Wine & Proton have solid support for EAC. It's still a thing for the less purist Linux gamers open to using a Windows VM and a passed AMD or Nvidia GPU + Looking Glass.

I've personally had success running EAC-enabled games with the easy-to-use Intel GVT passthrough tech:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95sLF_tLdWQ


How did you exactly do that? I tried to run a Win8.1 Pro with GPU Passthrough - but didn't work.
Do I need a second GPU for that, or can I just give the GPU to the VM?

Would be nice for my son - he wants to play Fortnite, but doesnt run on Ubuntu...

GVT-g is shared GPU passthrough, meaning only 1 GPU but it's only the Intel graphics that is supported. But recent Intel graphics is good enough for Fortnite.

What is the specs of the machine?

It's an AMD Ryzen 1800X with 1070Ti...
Wendigo 16 March 2019 at 8:00 am UTC
I just hope that game developers don't mistake Linux users trying to run their games as an increase of players using cheat software. That could lead to even more anti cheat software usage in video games.
Xaero_Vincent 18 March 2019 at 2:50 am UTC
einherjar
Xaero_Vincent
einherjar
Xaero_VincentEAC-enabled multiplayer games may bring up the resurgence of GPU passthrough tech for Linux users until Wine & Proton have solid support for EAC. It's still a thing for the less purist Linux gamers open to using a Windows VM and a passed AMD or Nvidia GPU + Looking Glass.

I've personally had success running EAC-enabled games with the easy-to-use Intel GVT passthrough tech:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=95sLF_tLdWQ


How did you exactly do that? I tried to run a Win8.1 Pro with GPU Passthrough - but didn't work.
Do I need a second GPU for that, or can I just give the GPU to the VM?

Would be nice for my son - he wants to play Fortnite, but doesnt run on Ubuntu...

GVT-g is shared GPU passthrough, meaning only 1 GPU but it's only the Intel graphics that is supported. But recent Intel graphics is good enough for Fortnite.

What is the specs of the machine?

It's an AMD Ryzen 1800X with 1070Ti...

GVT-g only works with Intel CPUs and GPUs. You have to do traditional dedicated GPU pass-through methods, which will only work on certain IOMMU compatible hardware & BIOSes. That said, I think Fortnite might work in VMWare Workstation Player as there is a DirectX 10 renderer for the game still. I'll try it on my VMware install and see if it works.


Last edited by Xaero_Vincent at 18 March 2019 at 2:50 am UTC
  Go to:
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on Patreon, Liberapay or Paypal. We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!

Due to spam you need to Register and Login to comment.


Or login with...

Livestreams & Videos
Community Livestreams
  • Crawl About: „StarCrawlers“
  • Date:
See more!
Popular this week
View by Category
Contact
Latest Comments
Latest Forum Posts