You can sign up to get a daily email of our articles, see the Mailing List page!

Steam's top releases of May show why Steam Play is needed for Linux

Posted by , | Views: 18,912

Valve have put out a news post to highlight some of the top games put onto Steam in May and it's another reminder of why Steam Play is needed.

In this blog post they start by listing 20 games that had the top revenue earned in the first two weeks following their release. Without looking, take a guess at the number of games in that list that actually support Linux.

Did you take a guess? The answer is a rather sobering two: Rise of Industry and Total War: THREE KINGDOMS. What happens to that number if we include those that can be run with Steam Play, with a "Platinum" rating from user reports on ProtonDB? That brings it right up to nine, which is far more impressive. It would be even higher, if Easy Anti-Cheat and BattlEye worked with Steam Play and since both said they're working on it (Sources: EAC - BattlEye), things can only get better.

They also went over the top five free games, measured by peak player count within the first two weeks following release: Conqueror's Blade, Splitgate: Arena Warfare, Minion Masters, Eden Rising and Never Split the Party. Of those, only one supports Linux which is Never Split the Party. If we take "Platinum" Steam Play games again, that only rises to two.

Note: The top free games list has two entries that also appear in the top revenue list.

Without popular games, Linux gaming won't grow to a point where it will be noticeable. Once again, this is a big reason why Steam Play is going to help in the long run. First we get games, then we get players, then we hopefully get developers wanting control with their own supported Linux builds.

What's interesting though, is this only takes into account the first two weeks in both cases. Taking a look myself a bit closer, out of the top 20 games most played on Steam right now (players online) only one of those games Valve listed in the blog post actually make it at all, which is Total War: THREE KINGDOMS and that does support Linux. Going even further, out of the top 100 games on Steam for player count, from Valve's list, only currently Total War: THREE KINGDOMS shows up.

As a quick additional and interesting measure for June: Looking at the top 20 by player count right now, how many in total support Linux? A much healthier 10, so half which isn't so bad. Stretching it out even more, from the top 100 by player count, 43 of them support Linux.

So while we don't get the "latest and greatest" games, keep in mind that we do have a lot of games that stay popular supported on Linux, so there's at least a silver lining of sorts there.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
45 Likes, Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG, Humble Store and Paradox Interactive. See more information here.
About the author -
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
214 comments
Page: 1/22»
  Go to:

jens 28 June 2019 at 3:41 pm UTC
View PC info
  • Supporter
QuoteWithout popular games, Linux gaming won't grow to a point where it will be noticeable. Once again, this is a big reason why Steam Play is going to help in the long run. First we get games, then we get players, then we hopefully get developers wanting control with their own supported Linux builds.

Thank you, these are exactly my thoughts on how to break the chicken and egg issue we have with our tiny market share. And unfortunately I don't see much alternatives.


Last edited by jens at 28 June 2019 at 3:42 pm UTC
LibertyPaulM 28 June 2019 at 3:47 pm UTC
I've said it before and I will say it again, "no tux no bucks" does more harm than good and this shows why
Sir_Diealot 28 June 2019 at 3:48 pm UTC
Or there are fewer games for Linux released now that SteamPlay is around. Who can say with certainty? Historical data and statistics probably can. Who is going to dig in?
Swiftpaw 28 June 2019 at 3:57 pm UTC
It's not debatable whether or not Wine/Proton allows more Windows gamers to move to Linux, it's easy to find stories of those who have switched because of that.

What is up for debate (the winner of which would supply evidence as proof) is whether or not the growing number of Linux gamers from this is causing more developers to support Linux.

Developers don't want to support Linux because it's just one more platform to support, and if Wine/Proton allows them to get away with that, they'll try to do it. But they can only get away with that if Linux gamers stop demanding Linux support. What matters is if the overall demand for Linux support is increasing or decreasing. If it increases, we should get more games with Linux support.

So are we? Is it increasing or not?

Personally for myself, and I hope for everyone else as well, they will not accept no Linux support for any and all games they pay money for going forward. No one should be treated as a second class gamer, and Linux should not turn into a second class gaming platform because of that. We want our platform to be getting more and more games with great Linux support. We definitely do not want to head in the opposite direction, and if we are and Valve is encouraging this with Proton, then Valve needs to start feeling some pressure to help more with promoting and encouraging Linux support rather than helping Microsoft's Windows gaming dominance.
Swiftpaw 28 June 2019 at 3:57 pm UTC
Sir_DiealotOr there are fewer games for Linux released now that SteamPlay is around. Who can say with certainty? Historical data and statistics probably can. Who is going to dig in?

I've been trying. I have the data, I just need to turn it into a graph in LibreOffice or something.
Swiftpaw 28 June 2019 at 3:59 pm UTC
LibertyPaulMI've said it before and I will say it again, "no tux no bucks" does more harm than good and this shows why

No Tux No Bux is exactly what we need more of so that we get more Linux support. We want to be Linux gamers and help the Linux support ecosystem, not Windows gamers helping the Windows support ecosystem.


Last edited by Swiftpaw at 28 June 2019 at 3:59 pm UTC
Liam Dawe 28 June 2019 at 4:00 pm UTC
Sir_DiealotOr there are fewer games for Linux released now that SteamPlay is around. Who can say with certainty? Historical data and statistics probably can. Who is going to dig in?
Well, out of the developers in that Valve post, 4/20 previously did a Linux game. Goes up to 5 if you count Avalanche Studios, with Mad Max ported externally by Feral.
Anders1232 28 June 2019 at 4:05 pm UTC
Even with steam play, I still with the "no tux no buck" rule, yeah I use steam play to play windows game that I bought before going all in GNU/Linux, but I still don't buy games that doesn't game a native version.
LibertyPaulM 28 June 2019 at 4:10 pm UTC
Swiftpaw
LibertyPaulMI've said it before and I will say it again, "no tux no bucks" does more harm than good and this shows why

No Tux No Bux is exactly what we need more of so that we get more Linux support. We want to be Linux gamers and help the Linux support ecosystem, not Windows gamers helping the Windows support ecosystem.

The cold hard truth is that devs will not support linux until the market grows. You think they support Windows because they like Windows? Nope, they support it because that is where the users are. Devs won't develop for linux because there are not enough users, users will not move to linux because that is not where the games they want to play are. Emulation and compatibility layers were always the best hope for linux gaming
jens 28 June 2019 at 4:14 pm UTC
View PC info
  • Supporter
LibertyPaulM
Swiftpaw
LibertyPaulMI've said it before and I will say it again, "no tux no bucks" does more harm than good and this shows why

No Tux No Bux is exactly what we need more of so that we get more Linux support. We want to be Linux gamers and help the Linux support ecosystem, not Windows gamers helping the Windows support ecosystem.

The cold hard truth is that devs will not support linux until the market grows. You think they support Windows because they like Windows? Nope, they support it because that is where the users are. Devs won't develop for linux because there are not enough users, users will not move to linux because that is not where the games they want to play are. Emulation and compatibility layers were always the best hope for linux gaming

To be fair, with Steam Play Linux gets visibility because a Steam Play purchase counts as Linux. This is not the case with other ways of playing non-Linux games on Linux.
Knowing that developers and publishers know that I spend my money for Linux is quite important for me.


Last edited by jens at 28 June 2019 at 4:16 pm UTC
  Go to:
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on Patreon, Liberapay or Paypal. We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!

You need to Register and Login to comment, submit articles and more.


Or login with...

Livestreams & Videos
Community Livestreams
  • Decisions: „The Detail“
  • Date:
See more!
Popular this week
View by Category
Contact
Latest Comments
Latest Forum Posts