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Transport Fever has released a big performance patch, might be worth it now

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I liked Transport Fever [Official Site, Steam], but the performance at release was pretty damn bad. The developers were well aware of this and so they have released a big performance patch.

Some highlights from the patch:
- Improved rendering performance
- Improved simulation performance
- Improved performance while building
- Improved stability on Mac computers
- Improved terrain tool
- Improved performance of vehicle/station/line etc. tables

I tried it out today and personally I think it still has a long way to go. The performance bounces about all over the place still. I've still seen dips down to around 20FPS when placing rail lines on a simple map. Shame, but hopefully they will keep doing performance patches.

Find the full release notes here. Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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The comments on this article are closed.
niarbeht 28 December 2016 at 12:30 am UTC
Sounds interesting. I really like transport management games (got my start on Railroad Tycoon), and it's nice to see someone still giving that genre some love.
Creak 28 December 2016 at 3:51 am UTC
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Me too! But since my RX 480 doesn't perform at its best with the open source drivers, I'd rather wait for the performances to be good before I buy the game.
Leopard 28 December 2016 at 6:06 am UTC
CreakMe too! But since my RX 480 doesn't perform at its best with the open source drivers, I'd rather wait for the performances to be good before I buy the game.

Why don't you use latest official Amd driver for your card?

http://support.amd.com/en-us/download/linux
Creak 28 December 2016 at 7:34 am UTC
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LeopardWhy don't you use latest official Amd driver for your card?

http://support.amd.com/en-us/download/linux
Because AMDGPU-PRO doesn't add much compared to AMDGPU (at least for gaming).
And I'm perfectly happy with the open source drivers and my RX 480. No drivers to install, it just works.
Performance will come later (mainly, once DAL/DC will get polished and merged into the kernel).
I just need to choose a bit more carefully my games. They run well if they are a little bit optimized.
Mountain Man 28 December 2016 at 1:14 pm UTC
Sounds like Train Fever all over again: a high-concept game full of bugs and poor optimization.
skinnyraf 28 December 2016 at 4:05 pm UTC
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Mountain ManSounds like Train Fever all over again: a high-concept game full of bugs and poor optimization.

I have just ticked 80 hours in Train Fever and I agree it's poorly optimised. That said, I haven't noticed too many bugs yet. Is it finicky and unpolished at places? Certainly. Buggy? Way less than many AAA titles with huge corporations behind them (Bethesda...).

That said, what was acceptable for Train Fever is hardly acceptable for its successor. Why? Train Fever started as a hobby project of a few students, crowdfunded and with a budget of $300k or something. However, I would expect they learned something, got some additional funding and staff and as a result were able to polish Transport Fever more than they actually did.

There was a whole lengthy post on the Steam Community listing all performance issues with Transport Fever. The biggest issue is no LoD implementation. Some (all?) vehicles have visible interior with passengers and drivers - and this interior is rendered even if the vehicle is a couple miles away (!!!). Tracks and roads are rendered in full detail (no shadows though) while being placed - so any change in shape causes re-rendering. These are just few examples how hobby-level is the design of the engine.
Creak 28 December 2016 at 6:40 pm UTC
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skinnyrafThese are just few examples how hobby-level is the design of the engine.
I still don't understand why they didn't use Unity. Cities: Skyline wasn't the best optimized game ever, but I didn't heard as much complains as for Transport Fever. (And Unity got a lot better, performance wise, since the version used in Cities: Skyline).

I've heard the engine in Transport Fever in made from scratch... That's a very very bad project management decision IMO.
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