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The developer of VK9, another rather interesting compatibility layer has advanced further with the announcement of another completed milestone.

Much like DXVK, it aims to push Direct3D over to Vulkan, while DXVK focuses on D3D11 and D3D10 the VK9 project is fixed on D3D9.

Writing about hitting the 29th milestone, the developer said this on their blog:

VK9 has reached it's 29th milestone. Reaching this milestone required further shader enhancements including support for applications which set a vertex shader but no pixel shader. In addition to this there are a number of fixes including proper NOOVERWRITE support which fixed the graphical corruption in UT99. This release also no longer depends on the push descriptor extension so VK9 should now be compatible with the closed source AMD driver. New 32bit and 64bit builds are available on Github.

Always fun to watch these projects progress, give it another year and it will be exciting to see what we can do with it. They have quite a few milestones left to achieve, which you can find on the Roadmap.

Find it on GitHub.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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mirv 17 December 2018 at 1:52 pm UTC
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Just as a small chime in, I'm really hopeful for this project. I know wine already handles DX9 -> OpenGL translation relatively well, it does have a performance hit (for me, anyway). Vulkan drivers are likely to be better than OpenGL, purely at a driver level, for doing the same work, and will help for that reason alone.

So my hardware is relatively old now, and it's not the graphics card which will bottleneck most gaming through wine. Or most gamaing at all really. I do see a big difference in CPU-side improvements, and there are games I couldn't play through "normal" wine, but could play quite happily with gallium-nine (MWnline, Dishonoured, Space Marine, for example). So if VK9 could help me regain that level of playability, then yes, I'd be quite happy.

Glad to see this project is still progressing.
Purple Library Guy 17 December 2018 at 6:31 pm UTC
Even if it's not that useful yet, I see this as future-proofing. OpenGL is gradually becoming obsolete. Eventually, driver and other sorts of support will become spotty and we're not going to want to be relying on translating stuff into OpenGL at that time. Better to have this already mature by then, than starting from scratch when the problem starts looking serious.
Cobham 17 December 2018 at 6:33 pm UTC
jens
Comandante ÑoñardoI wish Valve support this...
This project can give Proton the proper retro compatibility/performance for heavy weight DX9 games.

Are there any heavy weight DX9 games?

I believe a lot of Blizzard games are DX9, StarCraft 2 for instance.
wvstolzing 17 December 2018 at 6:54 pm UTC
As already mentioned, loads of Triple AiAiAi (hat tip to Jim Sterling) games run on dx9, even those that came out after dx10 became available. Assassin's Creed 1 has a dx10 mode and a dx9 fallback; but the next 3 games in the series are all dx9. GTA IV + its expansion packs are also dx9.
mrdeathjr 17 December 2018 at 8:39 pm UTC
johndoe86x
jens
Comandante ÑoñardoI wish Valve support this...

This project can give Proton the proper retro compatibility/performance for heavy weight DX9 games.

Are there any heavy weight DX9 games?

There are a ton of them.

It was the de facto API before DX11, but the biggest one that comes to mind is the original Skyrim.
wvstolzingAs already mentioned, loads of Triple AiAiAi (hat tip to Jim Sterling) games run on dx9, even those that came out after dx10 became available.

Assassin's Creed 1 has a dx10 mode and a dx9 fallback; but the next 3 games in the series are all dx9. GTA IV + its expansion packs are also dx9.

Yeah wine / proton actual dx9 implementation is very heavy specially with various unreal engine 3 games, need for speed hot pursuit 2010, skyrim vanilla and many others

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Normally this games dont use more than 2 cores at max (in some rare cases use more cores but are few compared with regular dx9 titles)

For before reason ryzen dont work good with this type of games, for this reason have core i3 8350K 5.0ghz / 215 single thread cinebench r15

Without forget i put more attention on older titles than newer because older titles lack of tests compared newer games

Another thing high single thread cpu in this games give better fps min




Last edited by mrdeathjr at 17 December 2018 at 8:59 pm UTC
Comandante Ñoñardo 17 December 2018 at 11:48 pm UTC
This project can improve performance on low spec hardware....
And I suppose old games like Still Life can finally work...
And Crysis. Don't forget Crysis.. Try to play that game via Proton with a modest hardware!
lejimster 18 December 2018 at 7:44 pm UTC
CybolicIt's highly subjective. In general, humans perceive anything over 25/30 FPS as "continuous" and anything over 60 FPS as "smooth" but most can distinguish between 30 and 60 FPS and quite a few can recognise changes between 60 and 120 FPS. Above that, things get extremely subjective and most people can't see any difference.

I can tell the difference on my desktop between 144 and 120Hz. It shouldn't be that different but its night and day to me. So when people claim to be able to notice changes between even higher refresh rates, I'm not so doubtful...

This is why I'm excited about Freesync finally landing. I've never tried it as I'm Linux only and this might be the one thing that could fool my perception of frame rate.
F.Ultra 18 December 2018 at 11:19 pm UTC
lejimster
CybolicIt's highly subjective. In general, humans perceive anything over 25/30 FPS as "continuous" and anything over 60 FPS as "smooth" but most can distinguish between 30 and 60 FPS and quite a few can recognise changes between 60 and 120 FPS. Above that, things get extremely subjective and most people can't see any difference.

I can tell the difference on my desktop between 144 and 120Hz. It shouldn't be that different but its night and day to me. So when people claim to be able to notice changes between even higher refresh rates, I'm not so doubtful...

This is why I'm excited about Freesync finally landing. I've never tried it as I'm Linux only and this might be the one thing that could fool my perception of frame rate.

If it's really "night and day" then it might be that your display simply behaves very differently on those two frequencies or that you really have not performed a blind comparison.
lejimster 19 December 2018 at 6:27 am UTC
F.UltraIf it's really "night and day" then it might be that your display simply behaves very differently on those two frequencies or that you really have not performed a blind comparison.

Possibly.
It was a unforced blind test of sorts. During a kernel update I lost the 144Hz mode and my monitor automatically dropped to 120Hz. At the time I noticed the desktop didn't feel as fluid, after rolling back to an older kernel… I was once again surprised at the difference.

I'm using a 1440p 27” monitor and those extra 24Hz make the cursor fluidity so much smoother its very evident.
Hubro 12 January 2019 at 4:40 pm UTC
Cybolic
Jiskin
KristianI have often seen Linux ports or games running under Wine reduce performance by double digit FPS and/or % and people hailing that as acceptable since performance is still good and they may have an otherwise great point.

But if running a game under Wine reduces the FPS say from 150 to 100 or from 200 to 150 the general public will tend to perceive that as an utter failure and totally unacceptable. It will dissuade them from switching and the Linux marketshare will stay low.

Perception is everything. So it is crucial to get Linux performance as near to Windows performance as possible,if it can be faster even better.

Edit:

If I remember the numbers correctly, The Witcher 2 ports performance was bad enough that it is a way way bigger performance loss than what the general public would accept.

Also another attitude I have sometimes seen is "Oh it is fine that game is not DX11 exclusive, its DX9 mode works fine under Wine" neither the general public nor hardcore gamers share that attitude. They think: "Why should I switch to Linux if that means giving up eyecandy or features?".

Which is why projects such as DXVK are so important.

Afaik, the human eyes cannot percept any change above 30 fps.

It's highly subjective. In general, humans perceive anything over 25/30 FPS as "continuous" and anything over 60 FPS as "smooth" but most can distinguish between 30 and 60 FPS and quite a few can recognise changes between 60 and 120 FPS. Above that, things get extremely subjective and most people can't see any difference.

Dude no, that's absolutely not true. If you're talking about watching movies you might be right, but the extra responsiveness and smoothness you get from higher frame rates when gaming is *extremely* noticeable. The difference between 60hz and 120hz when gaming is MASSIVE. I can say that from personal experience and the testimony of everyone I know of who've tried a 120hz monitor. If you disagree, just try playing Counter Strike on a PC with a mouse and moving your crosshair back and forth quickly. If you honestly can't tell the difference at that point then you must have some kind of medical condition, or just terrible eye sight. I would consult a doctor (or optician, respectively.)

I found the jump from 120hz to 165hz very noticeable as well, although less so than 60 to 120. In my uneducated opinion, the difference in smoothness in some situations (like quickly turning 180 degrees in a first person shooter) will probably be somewhat noticeable up to around 240hz, maybe even further. I'd have to try it myself to be sure.

(Also if your entire comment was about *seeing* a difference, not *feeling* a difference while gaming, then I apologize in advance. A high frame rate is much less important when you're just watching the screen and not interacting in any way.)
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