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A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By Nevertheless, 20 September 2019 at 8:04 am UTC

sub
Salvatos
pbThat's it, I'm telling my son right now to stop dreaming of developing games. This basically legalises keyshops and now even allowing you to sell the games you're already played and finished, if it wasn't bad enough before... Piracy killed Amiga gaming, socialism will kill PC gaming?
Can we maybe not be so dramatic? Some of us are old enough to remember that that’s how it was for the majority of video gaming’s existence. And books, DVDs, cars, etc. Sure it would be a disruptive change, but as long as it doesn’t open the door to duplication (piracy), the market can adapt. It might not be pretty for a while, but it won’t just die like that.

I'm not yet having a position on all this yet, tbh.

Being honest, this pure digital distribution is different to what
we had back then for games or even more for the book example.

If you sell a used book, it's used - no matter how hard you try.
Those old game boxed were usually plastic sealed and you had to open them.
From my experience the cardbox boxes suffered as did the jewel case plus the CD.

All I want to say is this: Usually a used product is not mint anymore.
It shows signs of use that is represented in the price when you resell it.

This is completely gone for digital products.
You sell something that's perfectly the same as you bought it first hand.
There is no price on the consumption of the game anymore, which is what the
developer actually wants to get paid for - and that's fair, isn't it?

It's a dilemma.

What I basically want to do is have fun with games that don't interfere with the functions of my computer and that don't spy on me. I most definitely want to give the developers of the games their fair share for development (otherwise I would prefer free software), and I want the games to be distributed in a comfortable, and secure way. For that I also really, really want to give distribution channels like Steam and GOG their fair share too! I really don't need to sell the games after that. I also wouldn't expect a developer to add feature patches (or gameserver services) to any game I purchased as used software.

Total War Saga: TROY officially announced and it will be coming to Linux next year
By Appelsin, 20 September 2019 at 8:00 am UTC

Now THIS is the very first Total War game I've ever actually been legitimately interested in! Finally, some real ancient era / bronze age strategy. Rome, Napoleon-ish and WW2 is starting to feel quite stale.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By sub, 20 September 2019 at 7:48 am UTC Likes: 5

Salvatos
pbThat's it, I'm telling my son right now to stop dreaming of developing games. This basically legalises keyshops and now even allowing you to sell the games you're already played and finished, if it wasn't bad enough before... Piracy killed Amiga gaming, socialism will kill PC gaming?
Can we maybe not be so dramatic? Some of us are old enough to remember that that’s how it was for the majority of video gaming’s existence. And books, DVDs, cars, etc. Sure it would be a disruptive change, but as long as it doesn’t open the door to duplication (piracy), the market can adapt. It might not be pretty for a while, but it won’t just die like that.

I'm not yet having a position on all this yet, tbh.

Being honest, this pure digital distribution is different to what
we had back then for games or even more for the book example.

If you sell a used book, it's used - no matter how hard you try.
Those old game boxed were usually plastic sealed and you had to open them.
From my experience the cardbox boxes suffered as did the jewel case plus the CD.

All I want to say is this: Usually a used product is not mint anymore.
It shows signs of use that is represented in the price when you resell it.

This is completely gone for digital products.
You sell something that's perfectly the same as you bought it first hand.
There is no price on the consumption of the game anymore, which is what the
developer actually wants to get paid for - and that's fair, isn't it?

It's a dilemma.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By Kuduzkehpan, 20 September 2019 at 7:47 am UTC

This will affect poor countries in positive way.Also ability to re-sell games will create a big marketing between players and maybe it creates a blackmarket inside the whole gamer community. At least i will be happy to sell my games and get some profit for re-investments and other development purposes.
Also i prefer a renting system which protects both developers and costumers in same time. Just for cases like
"facepunch and rust" as follows pay 10 dolar euro or whatever to rent a game for 3 months. Then decide to buy or not. This is also why DEMO's are up and running.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By DMG, 20 September 2019 at 7:36 am UTC Likes: 1

Interesting, how this will end. I can understand all sides, because everyone wants to earn some money. But compare games to real products is not very correct. Especially, if we see, how game after purchase can still be changed over some time. For example, if you buy an early release game. You won't have uncompleted game forever, right? After some time game will be finished and you will have new content after each update. And even after release some games receive a free update and add new content. So we can't compare game to a real product. No one will come and add new buttons to your monitor or make it bigger. So it is some kind of subscription. I only wish this all not to end as something bad to gamers. For example, specific rule and limitations to each country, so that in end piratical games again would come more attractive, than legal.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By Nevertheless, 20 September 2019 at 7:35 am UTC

Jiskin
Nevertheless
Jiskinoh my... I saw so stupid comments I don't know where to start...

QuoteValve and developers will be more profitable to abandon the entire French market
France is like their 7th market, how this could be more profitable?

QuoteI see many devs including Ubisoft leaving France, losing hundreds of jobs just because people want to resell a game they get for 15$ for 5$ bucks.

If a second hand market would crash a business, we will not even have cars... There are many reasons to leave France as a company, like taxes, strong social laws, etc., so just don't say anything you don't know about.

QuoteThis will hurt everyone.
Too many arguments I don't know what to say...

There is a difference between second hand cars and second hand software: Cars tend to catch scratches. Second hand games are indistinguishable from new games.
There is another one: There are no DRM free cars that you can simply keep when you sell them.

Second hand cars do not need servers. Games will have to be detached from accounts, to be able to sell them. So Valve could simply charge a percentage fee for detaching keys. I on their side wouldn't help to sell the keys, just detach and deliver them.
Developers still won't like the idea. They will sell less copies. Lifting prices would make second hand games even more attractive, but would also lift the detachment fee.

So yes, I think one result would definitely be higher prices for games.
Yeah yeah... And when you have issues with your second hand car you can fix it because there are factories that keep constructing pieces, with paid and trained people. It involves money too.

If you have a second hand game on steam, maybe you will not have the steam success, etc.

And as far as I know, the French Court hasn't prevent Steam to lock the resell to their platform only and to add transactions fees.

The problem is to compare games to "real" goods, like cars or pants, for the obvious reasons..
Valve sells games on the Steam platform. If Europe law forces them to make their products resellable, then of course those products will still be Steam games, which are, and most probably will, be handled by Steam keys.
All that Valve had to do to make the games movable is to unattach the Steam keys from their owners accounts. This is a service they can charge a fee for. I don't know how high the fee could legally be, but maybe developers could get their share from this too...
If there are legal limits, Valve had to decide if it's better to have s used key section on Steam, or if they want to get resellers involved, which at least will add their own share on used gamss prices.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By einherjar, 20 September 2019 at 7:24 am UTC Likes: 4

This kills small and medium dev studios and leads to more monopoly by the big ones.

The big ones will then hardly go to force you to things like stadia. There every thing is fine. You just pay for the service of game streaming.

Google Managers will be very pleased by this decision.

I think one can not treat a digital copy exactly the same, like a physical good. The digital one will never "wear up". It stays in the same quality.
So the devs have to go for higher entry prices or just make the game "free" and get on our nerves with micro transactions.

And we will get less titles like the Witcher series, if this is adopted in more countries. You can only develop those titles when they sell for a long time. But with a "used" Games market, this will just not happen.

Digitization at Europes best...

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By Skiski, 20 September 2019 at 7:12 am UTC

I just hope that it doesn't end in Valve stopping to sell games in France...

And I agree that comparing digital products with real products is just dumb. It's like when they told us that downloading thing is like stealing things. I'm not saying that it is a good thing, but it's not like a theft in real life.

But maybe, if a part of the sell goes to the developer, it can be a correct way to do it.

Either way, I don't sell my game discs and I don't intend to sell my digital games either.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By Purple Library Guy, 20 September 2019 at 6:49 am UTC Likes: 3

AnanaceI think that the major issue with this ruling is that the digital goods in question have no degradation - or logistics costs - at all. There will be absolutely no difference between a "brand new" copy of a digital game, or a "second hand" one, unless introduced artificially through some kind of copy degradation mechanic to not support resale again after X times.

With no product degradation between sales, and no logistical cost (in time or money) you - as a developer - would literally have to compete with your own product in the market, as "used" copies would be bit-by-bit identical to the "new" ones which you need to sell in order to recoup development costs.
I can see this ending up much like the piracy argument which drives DRM, where games sales are going to be crucial in the first weeks of the game release, only this time backed by legal rulings. As you - again as a developer - will have to start competing with your own product - sold at a cheaper price at the exact same quality - the moment the first players finishes their copies and wants to get some money back by reselling it.

So really, the only way I could see this not causing a massive impact on game development - especially single-player and other games which are possible to "finish" - would be if artificial degradation or other resale restrictions (logistical cost) were introduced. Something to make "new" copies somehow different from "used" ones, to make sure that there's at least some reason for people to want to pay more for a "new" copy rather than a bit-perfect "used" one.
An interesting point. I do think there is one thing that does degrade games and most digital goods--or rather, degrade their value: Time. Old games go on sale, because people are not willing to pay as much for old games. Novelty wears off.
I've seen someone in the thread mention the idea of a minimum time delay before resale; that might be an acceptable compromise. Of course, most people aren't going to want to resell instantly in the first place, because they want to play their game; they didn't buy the thing just to immediately not have it any more.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By Jiskin, 20 September 2019 at 6:35 am UTC

Nevertheless
Jiskinoh my... I saw so stupid comments I don't know where to start...

QuoteValve and developers will be more profitable to abandon the entire French market
France is like their 7th market, how this could be more profitable?

QuoteI see many devs including Ubisoft leaving France, losing hundreds of jobs just because people want to resell a game they get for 15$ for 5$ bucks.

If a second hand market would crash a business, we will not even have cars... There are many reasons to leave France as a company, like taxes, strong social laws, etc., so just don't say anything you don't know about.

QuoteThis will hurt everyone.
Too many arguments I don't know what to say...

There is a difference between second hand cars and second hand software: Cars tend to catch scratches. Second hand games are indistinguishable from new games.
There is another one: There are no DRM free cars that you can simply keep when you sell them.

Second hand cars do not need servers. Games will have to be detached from accounts, to be able to sell them. So Valve could simply charge a percentage fee for detaching keys. I on their side wouldn't help to sell the keys, just detach and deliver them.
Developers still won't like the idea. They will sell less copies. Lifting prices would make second hand games even more attractive, but would also lift the detachment fee.

So yes, I think one result would definitely be higher prices for games.
Yeah yeah... And when you have issues with your second hand car you can fix it because there are factories that keep constructing pieces, with paid and trained people. It involves money too.

If you have a second hand game on steam, maybe you will not have the steam success, etc.

And as far as I know, the French Court hasn't prevent Steam to lock the resell to their platform only and to add transactions fees.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By Ananace, 20 September 2019 at 6:29 am UTC Likes: 4

I think that the major issue with this ruling is that the digital goods in question have no degradation - or logistics costs - at all. There will be absolutely no difference between a "brand new" copy of a digital game, or a "second hand" one, unless introduced artificially through some kind of copy degradation mechanic to not support resale again after X times.

With no product degradation between sales, and no logistical cost (in time or money) you - as a developer - would literally have to compete with your own product in the market, as "used" copies would be bit-by-bit identical to the "new" ones which you need to sell in order to recoup development costs.
I can see this ending up much like the piracy argument which drives DRM, where games sales are going to be crucial in the first weeks of the game release, only this time backed by legal rulings. As you - again as a developer - will have to start competing with your own product - sold at a cheaper price at the exact same quality - the moment the first players finishes their copies and wants to get some money back by reselling it.

So really, the only way I could see this not causing a massive impact on game development - especially single-player and other games which are possible to "finish" - would be if artificial degradation or other resale restrictions (logistical cost) were introduced. Something to make "new" copies somehow different from "used" ones, to make sure that there's at least some reason for people to want to pay more for a "new" copy rather than a bit-perfect "used" one.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By Purple Library Guy, 20 September 2019 at 6:25 am UTC Likes: 2

On the question of keys and, basically, cheating and such . . . I am not now nor have I ever been a fan of cryptocurrency. But this strikes me as a potential application for blockchain stuff. Not, like, mining, just the blockchain ability to verify authenticity.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By Purple Library Guy, 20 September 2019 at 6:22 am UTC

g000hFor those thinking this will be a good thing for DRM-Free Gaming: I think the opposite - This will push all new commercial games to become purely rental titles, i.e. You can download the game for free, but you won't be able to play it without a subscription. DRM-Free games will just be for free gaming (i.e. where no money is paid for the game title). Commercial game developers won't be releasing DRM-Free any more.
Until the next lawsuit. I'm not sure getting around law is quite so simple as all that.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By Purple Library Guy, 20 September 2019 at 6:10 am UTC Likes: 1

Avehicle7887Although the consumer might be at an advantage here, I can already see the downsides: More DRM, indie devs losing profit and even risk going out of business and DRM-Free stores would have to stop selling games to french customers otherwise they risk a serious issue. I doubt they will stop at Valve, it would be unfair otherwise.

This is a very bad call, and it shows clearly that the people making these decisions have no clue about games and of the challenges devs face every day. They're just paper pushers who didn't think of the consequences, which outweigh the benefits here.

Even if this rule goes against me (the consumer). I don't agree with it and I don't want it.
There are two issues here, justice and economics.
The justice one is . . . not exactly simple, but actually I think pretty simple in essence once all the froth is boiled off. And on the justice angle I think the basic point is people should own the stuff they buy. So on that front I think it's a good ruling. And I'm willing to see a certain amount of negative practical consequences to have that principle upheld. I won't go so far as to say let justice be done though the sky fall, but I don't believe in letting expedience win all the time; it tends to be a false expedience in the longer run.

The economic one is I think a lot less simple than many people here think. It's about equilibria IMO. There's a lot of talk about how devs will all go out of business because of this. But devs always go out of business, always have and always will, and any change to the rate of it caused by this will be temporary, until a new equilibrium is reached. And it may not have any impact at all. Basically, I think there's a sort of, how to put it, natural rate of developer failure. If there are few developers compared to the size of the market, then they will nearly all do well, and word will get around that game developing is a great thing to get into. Then there will be more game developers; the numbers will keep rising until the market is saturated and developers start going out of business, at which point word will get out that game developing is a lousy thing to get into. Fewer developers will enter and, with those failures, the number of developers will fall, at some point making the field less cluttered for those who remain, who will do better. Basically it all fluctuates around an equilibrium level of some number of dollars in the market per developer which represents a level of developer income and rate of developer bankruptcy that's sort of neutral in terms of how much it tempts people to get into the biz. It's probably a lower number of dollars, with higher levels of failure, than strict rationality would dictate 'cause certain people have an emotional yen to make games and people tend to be optimistic about their ability to beat the odds. Since news is not instant and it takes a while for it to sink in, even if the market stayed static there would be a lot of fluctuations around whatever the ultimate equilibrium would be. But in the real world, there are shocks to the market--it grows, it shrinks, and it does things which affect profit per sale, which works pretty much as if the market had grown or shrunk. So you never actually hit the equilibrium level and stay there. Every time there's a shock, it impacts the profit per developer, which in the end will lead to more developers entering or leaving, heading towards (and overshooting) that equilibrium level.
So, if a decision like this is a shock that drops the profit per game, effectively shrinking the number of dollars in the market, it will cause more failures, yes, but only until we reach that equilibrium number of dollars per developer again. It wouldn't be a catastrophe forever changing the landscape, just a shock equivalent to a slight shrinkage of the game market.

But I'm not sure it would even represent such a shock. People assuming it would are implicitly assuming a customer base whose purchasing operates in a way like, each customer buys a certain number of games, or something like that. This works for, say, food--you buy the groceries you need to eat; if they get more expensive you spend more money on groceries, if they get cheaper you may spend less. Even there, it's not always the case--often consumers will try to avoid spending more by buying lousier food if groceries get more expensive, and if groceries get cheaper they may even do things like go organic or get fancier things they wanted but couldn't afford. With gamers I think it's even more pronounced; most gamers don't have a set list of games they will buy, after which they will stop. Rather, they spend roughly what they can afford, or what they're willing to waste on this particular hobby, plus a bit more if they see something particularly shiny. So here's the thing: Gamer A re-sells a game to gamer B. What does gamer A do with the money? Probably buys a game. Quite likely gamer A considers the sale a reduction in the total they have spent on games, so they now have more room in their game-buying budget. I just today on a GamingOnLinux thread saw someone comment that they bought a game using the money they have from getting a refund on another game. That's how gamers think, that's I think how the gaming market works. If that's the case, something like this will have surprisingly little effect on net developer income.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By chancho_zombie, 20 September 2019 at 5:52 am UTC

here is a new take on how valve could solve this.

If the judge says that second hand games do exist and that digital games can wore out. Then valve could add planned obsolescence to the mix. It doesn't make sense maintaining a game with software updates/patches forever when all there is left, is a second hand market of keys, the developers are not getting fresh cash anymore. It doesn't make sense and it's not fair. So valve could just expiry the keys after some validations. Three or four redemptions and the key is done you cannot validate it anymore.

if this is all about equality with physical goods then valve could argue that since the judge wants to treat digital as physical, it makes sense wearing out the keys.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By morphles, 20 September 2019 at 5:44 am UTC

I do not agree that it is all that good for resellers, at least not in long run. They can be squished in seconds, just change how keys (and complaints related to them) are handled and they are 100% done. Humble store might however have problems on their hands, though they might end up converting to distributor like steam or gog itself.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By morphles, 20 September 2019 at 5:38 am UTC

Quoteas more as I analyze this I consider more implications. This would be the end for indie games that sell cheap like below 1 usd. They are effectively killing that niche market forever. And there are a lot of decent indie games for less than 1 usd.
I actually do not see this at all, with price that low, anyone can by it as first sale, and savings when buying resale are basically cents (depending on "transaction costs" it might never be cheaper to buy second hand, as publisher can have better terms). And if this lowers prices of all other games, than this $1 game comparatively looks better (say we have indiecheapo for $1 vs ElGrandeAAA for 80$, from price you think difference in those games is huge, but then with this after some tiem you see indeacheapo is still $1, while ElGrandeAAA is now just $20, so comparatively indie game got 4x better if judging by price ratio!) As I said previously most screwed will be big budgets



Another thing with resale, sensibly keys will have to be tied to store platform forewer, otherwise nothing can be enforced. But it most likely will not legally stand to resell for say steam wallet "cash" as that is not a real money, that you can buy bread and milk with, its more like store coupon and can likely be appealed. So likely digital stores will need ways to allow users to "cash out" their stuff, with all fun that this might imply.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By chancho_zombie, 20 September 2019 at 5:28 am UTC

as more as I analyze this I consider more implications. This would be the end for indie games that sell cheap like below 1 usd. They are effectively killing that niche market forever. And there are a lot of decent indie games for less than 1 usd.

And we all ready had a mess with ppl buying humble bundle keys in bulk and then reselling them in G2A or other shady sites. As many said now that is perfectly legal and instead of valve and others fighting it they will have to embrace it.

this could be the end of humble bundle, valve could just instead refuse to validate their keys because it will create a gigantic black market that they cannot fight anymore.

I say it again the guys at G2A are rubbing their hands on this.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By morphles, 20 September 2019 at 5:25 am UTC

Interesting times ahead. Assuming this wiggles its way into EU laws (and then likely to other places too).
Software distribution might become more efficient. Take me as an example, some games/software is "kinda interesting", but there is no way in hell I'm paying full price for it, nor maybe even 50% so only chance for me to consider buying it is if we get "sick sale" with discount of say 80%. With used market I would assume prices could fall more in line with "remaining demand" and not just on publishers whims to do sales (which then end).

Now another thing, that I think might happen and I would personally like very much - it should really screw over AAA games. Use game market => less first/full price sales => less possible revenue => max expenses for production can not be as high => no more games costing multi millions to develop. I actually think this is much better for indies that do "cheaper work" (the production cost is not astronomical). Though for previous statement there is one other facet to consider. Kinds of games that will be made will likely change significantly, again for the better, for my personal tastes. As certain games, that games that are more of game, will become more common, while games that are less of a game will be less common. What I mean by games that are games - games that have qualities of "real games" like chess, go, hex = infinite replay value, and not some mildly interactive story. So that will be good for such games as I see them retaining value (if game is good) over whole market better than story based games as they have better replay value - so you have bigger chance to want to keep it. Also this gold for E-Sports, kinda, as such games are all about replay and honing skills => you do not want to sell your copy. Visual novels though... I see them in worst situation with this, with story based RPG's probably second on chopping block (the size of impact from this); while something like DOTA or StarCraft being least affected, though they will might need to work harder to keep world engaged with product.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By Phlebiac, 20 September 2019 at 5:21 am UTC

MalNedless to say that releasing an untested and badly optimized game would quickly become a suicidal move and nobody would do it.

Isn't that what killed Arkham Knight, which released right after the new Steam refund policy came into effect? We lost the Linux port due to that, sadly...

Total War Saga: TROY officially announced and it will be coming to Linux next year
By Phlebiac, 20 September 2019 at 4:37 am UTC

Feral must have a pretty favorable contract with Sega, to be porting every Total War game. Perhaps Creative Assembly tried and failed to do the first Linux port themselves (didn't they promise one that was never delivered?), so Feral was contracted to do the next dozen of them, or something like that. ;-)

Total War Saga: TROY officially announced and it will be coming to Linux next year
By Purple Library Guy, 20 September 2019 at 4:24 am UTC Likes: 1

wvstolzing
TcheyToo bad it's going to be "historical", and not "mythological" with beasts, gods, etc.

Given how little we currently know about the historical event, I think their 'historical' account would end up being just Homer without the supernatural bits. (Not that my memory is at all fresh on this subject, but the supernatural bits in the Iliad are nowhere as fantastical as those in the Odyssey in any case.)
True. I mean, conceptually some are pretty upscale--gods frequently get involved. But they kind of have a Zeus-enforced deal that doesn't let them actually show up personally on the battlefield, so it's mostly just juicing their favoured dudes, which isn't all that visually dramatic.
Could be interesting to add if done right, a sort of system for doing god politics where if you curry divine favour properly you get to occasionally power up a hero, except the more you push the powerup the bigger the chance that some opposing god will get pissed off and power up an opponent hero.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By 14, 20 September 2019 at 3:06 am UTC Likes: 1

Here is a true story:
On Amazon, I asked if I could resell a Ubisoft game after I was done with it or if it required tying the game key to some account. An actual Ubisoft rep answered the question on Amazon and said I could resell the game. Guess what. I bought it. The person that buys the used game from me wouldn't have bought it new at full price. They get to play it sooner than waiting for a price drop. The harm for Ubisoft is they don't get a sale when the game's retail price drops enough a year or two later.

So, it goes like this: $60 from me at launch or $20 from me and the other guy ($40 total) two years later.

My PS4 would lose some value if I could start selling my Steam games. But yeah, I can imagine more and more games requiring "3rd-party EULA," which would mean assigning the game license to an account outside of Steam and logging in via a launcher in order to play. That would be really annoying. But I think consumers could fight against that with their dollars and reviews.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By mylka, 20 September 2019 at 2:29 am UTC

ObsidianBlkI don't know... I kinda like the idea of potentially forcing the industry into physical distribution once more, but I'm not so naive to think that would actually happen.

i dont think linux gaming would have come so far with DISCs
which store would sell linux games? it is physical storage the owner has to pay for. of course they would have more windows games

it is a very difficult topic. i understand both sides.
if valve goes down, all you games are gone..... but if you have a DVD, the DVD also is useless afers some years
and maybe you cant even install it anymore, because your newer OS doesnt support it
on steam they can change all files easily

i think as it is, it is good

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By Shmerl, 20 September 2019 at 1:17 am UTC

Why would you want to go back to physical distribution? It's surely step backwards.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By ObsidianBlk, 20 September 2019 at 1:12 am UTC Likes: 1

Honestly, I like that this is happening. We've become a culture where we're more than happy "buying" games knowing full well they can be stripped from us without warning at any time (this has happened to a few games on the Playstation store... ex. PT). Given the industry is also in some very hot water with lootboxes *cough* I mean "surprise mechanics" *cough*, as well as microtransactions in general, we ~~may~~ see a radical shift for the industry.

I'll admit, a digital distribution store allowing "resale" of their games is tricky. There is *no* inventory at all. There's no supply and demand because the supply is infinite and there's nothing lost buying a "used" copy of a game (like, the disc could be worn, or you may not get the nice box, or you might not get any of the "extras" [often included with games in the 80s and 90s]), so you don't miss out on anything from a used copy.

I don't know... I kinda like the idea of potentially forcing the industry into physical distribution once more, but I'm not so naive to think that would actually happen.

Valve have already begun tweaking the new Steam Library Beta
By Phlebiac, 20 September 2019 at 12:55 am UTC Likes: 1

jgacasopening Oxygen Not Included page eats all my 8 GB of RAM + 2 GB of swap file in a matter of seconds.

Don't know if it will help, but try turning on "Low Bandwidth Mode" and "Low Performance Mode" in the Library section of the Steam settings. The first option at least cut out some cruft I didn't care to see.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By x_wing, 20 September 2019 at 12:42 am UTC

Being from Argentina made me think of another big problem for Steam: how to handle regional prices? I know that they already allows some restriction to keys (e.g. only allow the activation on Latam), but with countries as the one I live (with a currency that devaluates more than a 30% from one week to another) Steam will have a hard time trying to control reselling prices if it's not careful.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By x_wing, 20 September 2019 at 12:27 am UTC

Shmerl
x_wingThe law just says that you should be able to resell, but it doesn't says where. So, I think that is quite probable that you will only be able to resell in a internal market of the store (and the store can get a fee from that resell)

I don't think that would fit the idea of that law. I.e. it's not mandating a middleman. So it means you can sell it however you want.

That's debatable. You have access to the game in their platform, so only allowing the reselling in their platform will have a lot of sense. Anyway, they can do this in the beginning a then fight the lawsuit that could come afterwards.

A French court has ruled that Valve should allow people to re-sell their digital games
By Shmerl, 20 September 2019 at 12:24 am UTC

x_wingThe law just says that you should be able to resell, but it doesn't says where. So, I think that is quite probable that you will only be able to resell in a internal market of the store (and the store can get a fee from that resell)

I don't think that would fit the idea of that law. I.e. it's not mandating a middleman. So it means you can sell it however you want, and the store and developers might get nothing from the secondary sales.

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