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Latest Comments by Klaus
The former Paradox Interactive CEO thinks "platform holders" 30% cut is "outrageous"
15 July 2019 at 7:19 am UTC Likes: 1

DedaleI have no idea what the "fair" cut would be. I would need to work in this business, know the actual numbers and crunch them.

But -for what it's worth- i recall posts i had read from BOOK publishers who explained why their ebooks were actually not cheaper than the paper ones. It was because the infrastructure to distribute them was more expensive. Networks of computer did cost them more than printing presses, paper and shipping. The computer people paid to maintain such infrastructure was more expensive than librarians.

But the public would have none of it. Downloading an ebook looks simple so they wanted the electronic versions of their books for cheaper !

ArdjeThat's true, if you use DRM. They have to pay DRM license, hosting at adobe and whatever kind of crap they pull to keep it locked down. It's false if your books are DRM free.
So I always buy DRM free. And they are indeed cheaper than physical books.

Plus, DRM harms the value of the book, as it is reduced from property to a license tied to some account and operator. It also doesn't really prevent piracy, as the DRM is easily removed. Also, you can't lend the book away.

Now that eBooks are established, I will usually prefer to buy a book as eBook over softcover, even if it were slightly more expensive. But asking for the same price at the beginning was really just asking Amazon to monopolize the market... Especially in Austria/Germany, where the publishers were used to releasing soft-cover versions with a one-year delay, and then tied the eBook prices to whatever was the highest price on the market.

Meaning that until Amazon Kindle became available, eBooks required additional hardware and were LESS convenient, due to having to mess with a DRM setup, while being sold at the premium price.

Established publishers tend to shoot themselves in the foot and then blame the ignorant customers.

Canonical have released a statement on Ubuntu and 32bit support, will keep select packages
26 June 2019 at 9:15 am UTC Likes: 3

mirv
Jaromir
NanobangIoT: More ways to be hacked, more ways to be spied on. Socio-techno dross. Also pretty unrelated to the article at hand---not as unrelated as, say EMF sickness, but pretty fuckin' unrelated all the same.
It is predicted that 5G (= EMF) will benefit IoT innovation. So the IoT revolution in which Ubuntu is an important player will make living organisms (and people) sicker by increasing the EMF radiation.

This seems to me to contradict the Ubuntu philosophy:

"You cannot only be human and when you have this characteristic - Ubuntu - you are known for your generosity. We think of ourselves too often, because only individuals, separated from each other, while you are connected and what you do affect the entire world. When you do it right, it spreads; it's for all humanity. "

The link between Ubuntu Linux and EMF disease is therefore 5G technology that plays a central role in both cases.

Whatever you're smoking, I suggest you stop.

I work with radio communications, and have done so across multiple frequency bands. Standing on a slab of granite is more dangerous. Various foods that you eat (and whatever it is that you smoke) are more dangerous not only to yourself, but those around you.

Though I agree with the factual part of the statement, I don't think that insults will help the discussion. I mean, the discussion shouldn't be necessary anymore at this point, but the same people that spread misinformation are also very good at making people feel right about it, and insults only help them.

Canonical have released a statement on Ubuntu and 32bit support, will keep select packages
26 June 2019 at 9:10 am UTC Likes: 2

Regarding communication issues: It seems from some comments like there WAS miscommunication about these plans over the last years, with important parties like Wine and Valve not commenting adequately on the ideas. But if they had realized the importance of 32bit libraries, they probably wouldn't have waited for Valve/Wine to provide feedback on mailing lists, but would likely have directly requested feedback.

To be that sounds like a case of "mutually unclear communication". Valve or Wine-devs could have commented then, but it is easy to miss semi-internal communication or its sigificance, when no official inquiries are made. If important parties don't comment, you can't just assume they have read and understood your plans, yet if you never assume implicit agreement, you'd never get anything done.

Canonical have released a statement on Ubuntu and 32bit support, will keep select packages
26 June 2019 at 9:02 am UTC Likes: 1

jasonm
Shmerl
jasonmThat's fine, you can be out. Just how many 32 bit apps do you run on your machine? I run one, steam.

I guess you are not a gamer and not in this topic then. A lot of older games are 32-bit, especially Wine use case. I'd say any game older than from 2015 - is very likely 32-bit. That's a lot of games! So Steam client itself is pretty much irrelevant in comparison with sheer amount of 32-bit games.


But they are keeping the 32 bit stuff that makes everything work currently. They don't make older games anymore.

As I understand, the problem is more than just the legacy games; If it were just an issue of legacy 32bit native applications, frozen library versions might suffice – though I'm not adept enough with Linux to check that statement.

The major issue seems to be that Wine/Proton need 32bit libraries to provide compatibility with Windows software, and they need updated versions of those libraries in order to continue to improve:

jre-phoenix, at discourse.ubuntu.com (link)Wine heavily relies on i386. Not only for legacy 32-bit software, but also “almost all” 64-bit software uses a 32-bit installer.[1] “It’s practically impossible to implement 32-bit on top of 64-bit”, so that you wouldn’t need i386 at all.[2]. So although Wine will still be available in the Ubuntu archive on amd64, it’ll be basically useless.

To support current features in new Wine releases you need recent versions of a few libraries (e.g. faudio, vulkan-loader and vkd3d, and those require other recent stuff like sdl2, …).[3] If you use our Debian packages also current versions of unicode-data and khronos-api. 18.04 is already too old to fully support current Wine with (all) current features. [...]

Remember the SMACH Z handheld? It's apparently going to be at E3 this year
6 June 2019 at 11:38 am UTC Likes: 2

Beamboom[...] But really, Nintendo exist in a dimension of their own. There's no other company on the face of this earth who can operate like Nintendo with their insanely strong IPs. No other console maker could launch an as dramatically underpowered console as the Wii and get away with it, or sell that much. [...]
I don't think the "underpowered" aspect was really all that important, though I agree that the IPs are. It isn't about the IP itself though, but rather the casual and family-friendly reputation, which in turn makes the specs arms-race less relevant to Nintendo. With the Wii, the focus was on pioneering or refining input methods, that make the platform relevant outside for people who otherwise wouldn't be interested in consoles at all. With the Switch, that tradition is continued, but adding the "handheld hybrid" capabilities.

Remember the SMACH Z handheld? It's apparently going to be at E3 this year
5 June 2019 at 4:26 pm UTC Likes: 1

ShmerlNintendo's SoC from Nvidia is way underpowered in comparison.
The nominal power may be lower, but don't forget to account for device-specific optimization and specialized OS, that increase the actual performance. PC-versions in particular, sadly often target top-end machines first. I've felt the pain sufficiently, when playing Nier Automata on a then 3-year old Thinkpad Edge – After installing the fan-made "FAR" patch, I was able to play it at "impressive" 640x400, with almost stable 25 fps... (Note: The low resolution actually looked pretty good, almost like intentional pixel-art. The only real improvement on newer hardware was gained by having fluent 60fps choreography.)

If at the time the Switch had been available, but somewhat aged, the developer would likely have tried to produce a separate, more optimized version. No such support will be given to niche devices. Not even "laptop gamers" that can't just slot in a new graphics card are really being accounted for, and that should be a reasonably big market by comparison.

Remember the SMACH Z handheld? It's apparently going to be at E3 this year
5 June 2019 at 3:21 pm UTC Likes: 4

Eike
Arehandoro
BeamboomThe market for small dedicated handheld gaming devices. That market died right after the PSP.
20 million of Nintendo Switch owners don't agree with that statement.
Well, there are some people not using Switch outside their homes...
Handhelds are not exclusively about "on the go" use though. Using the detached Switch in bed or on a sofa, while the big screen is used for TV by someone else, ... The handheld form factor, combined with support for main-stream "stationary" games, opens up interesting possibilties also within a home. The same (albeit without explicit developer support for the form factor and with a higher price point) applies for this devicce I guess.

Remember the SMACH Z handheld? It's apparently going to be at E3 this year
5 June 2019 at 12:03 pm UTC

ageres
KlausThe switch is pretty cheap actually at 300-330€, and comes with access to traditionally developed "full" games
…which are overpriced as hell, especially indie games, and you have to re-buy them even if you've got them on Steam or elsewhere.
Matter of priorities really. For me "playing it comfortably" easily trumps "has a 75% steam discount", especially since I hardly even have the time to play through games quickly enough for the price difference to have a relevant effect on my budget. All those discounts have given me... is a large backlog.

Though I'll gladly admit, that I'd prefer locally streaming my already-owned games over rebuying, if it exceeds the 20€ mark.

ageres
KlausLacking this support, games that will run well on a Switch will likely fall behind quickly on the much more expensive SMACH.
Or they will not. Anyway, Smach is a computer, so you'll be able to tweak games to get better performance.
I'd rather pay more than have to spend time tweaking performance... Matter of subjective priorities again.

ageres
KlausIt also will have to fight with the battery-life and performance implications of running a full desktop OS with traditional pre-mobile multitasking.
But if that OS is Linux…
It's not really a Windows-specific issue though, but rather in the difference between dedicated mobile and desktop operating systems, and how it affects how their third-party software is written.

Remember the SMACH Z handheld? It's apparently going to be at E3 this year
5 June 2019 at 9:20 am UTC Likes: 1

ageres
UltraAltesBrotWhy purchase an expensive new device when you already have a smartphone or tablet?
Say this to Nintendo.
The switch is pretty cheap actually at 300-330€, and comes with access to traditionally developed "full" games, rather than an ecosystem dominated by F2P games. While there are plenty of good F2P games, they are usually designed to be played in short sessions over a long time, as opposed to traditional single-player games, where "one hour" is a short session, and a sense of "finishing" the game is usually part of the design. As a consequence, the Switch targets a market orthogonal to typical mobile gaming.

Additionally it is backed by an established company, and games will be optimized for it – notabily including UI adjustments to support the small internal screen, presumably. Lacking this support, games that will run well on a Switch will likely fall behind quickly on the much more expensive SMACH. Never mind the implications of the Startup-character of the company in terms of trust (repairs, replacement, future models, ...).

It also will have to fight with the battery-life and performance implications of running a full desktop OS with traditional pre-mobile multitasking.

Remember the SMACH Z handheld? It's apparently going to be at E3 this year
5 June 2019 at 9:20 am UTC

TheRiddick
DragunovMore rich people toys...Price is outrageous

yeah that's kinda what I was thinking, I mean you could get a switch for cheaper, aren't Nintendo allowing steam streaming on the switch soon via app?

Remember when Apple rejected the SteamLink app at first? Nintendo is presumably cross-financing the hardware with software sales, so they have even more reason to reject streaming support, unless it requires a pricey subscription.

I'd love it though. I'm currently holding out o buying new games, that are available on Switch, because I plan to buy one eventually and prefer playing in bed. A streaming feature would make it "instant buy" as it would allow me to bridge to playing games from my backlog and PC-only games (assuming controller support), or games where modding is important part of the experience.

Now, if only Nintendo truely arrived in the 21st century, by making cloud-saves a default feature for all games... I'd easily rebuy some games that sit unfinished on my PC to play them in bed or in the garden, but not if the save-games are tied to the hardware with no way to back them up.

Better yet, allow importing PC save-games to the Switch version of games, where technically possible. Sadly, it seems that Nintendo is concerned about such a feature being an attack vector for jailbreaks and playing illicit copies of games.

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