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Latest Comments by Samsai
Our quick-picks of the best Linux games of 2020 so far
3 July 2020 at 11:20 am UTC Likes: 4

Quoting: PatolaOf course you can. It would just not be the same thing as actually feeling there. It would be a rationalization of being there, maybe, but then again, you would not easily deceive your mind, you would not trigger automatic processes which happens when you are in a setting.
The kind of immersion you are talking about does not exist in any game, using any graphics or any virtual reality technology. Even if the graphics were more or less accurate to life (which they are not, not even with ray-tracing), you still wouldn't reach the level of immersion you describe as you would still not feel the wind and draft, smell the distinct smells of the environments or feel the tactility of the ground underneath you.

The kind of immersion that is possible, I claim is possible just as well with VR as it is with books. VR might aid you in feeling immersed, but is not a strict requirement for doing so. And thus, I will make the claim that graphics are not a strict requirement for a game to feel immersive. And I will make the further claim that a game does not need to feel immersive for it to feel fun, since some games I enjoy for mechanical reasons rather than for feeling like I am there.

Our quick-picks of the best Linux games of 2020 so far
3 July 2020 at 10:57 am UTC Likes: 2

Quoting: Patola
Quoting: SamsaiSometimes I get really immersed in books and those things have no graphics at all.
Because it is a different type of immersion. One that is not reliant on getting environmental cues, shadows, noticing details, taking the pitch and direction of sound into account, etc., instead you picture it into your mind with conscious effort. Sometimes the narration is so engaging and descriptive that it helps you forming this mind picture, but then again, this is a different thing -- you are not processing and interpreting the environment, you are creating it.
So you are saying graphics turn off one's ability to imagine environments? That I cannot use a 2D game as a representation of the game world and project my own imaginary world on it? Okay then.

To me there is only one immersion, the feeling of being part of a fictional world, and I can accomplish that by reading books, watching movies, playing games of textual, 2D and 3D variety.

Our quick-picks of the best Linux games of 2020 so far
3 July 2020 at 10:35 am UTC Likes: 8

Sometimes I get really immersed in books and those things have no graphics at all.

A chat with the developer of the action-packed roguelike Burning Knight
2 July 2020 at 5:31 pm UTC Likes: 4

Lots of props to developing a full game at that age and much respect for going with a code-oriented approach instead of going for a full-fledged engine. Obviously sad to hear that the game hasn't had much commercial success, but I'm still hoping you continue developing games. Getting a full game out at 17 is definitely impressive, something that I can only look at with admiration as a 23 yo CS student that never seems to get any side-projects completed.

Will need to check this game out at some point, it looks quite a bit like some games I already enjoy.

Godot Engine 3.2.2 is out with 2D batching for the GLES2 renderer
28 June 2020 at 8:16 pm UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: setzer22I've been on the alpha/rc versions of 3.2.2 for a while and I can confirm emacs for GDscript works quite well! Also Godot is a great engine overall and it's nice to see it progress!

@Samsai A note on emacs and GDscript: This relies on lsp-mode, which is painfully slow on emacs 26 due to a custom JSON parser written in elisp. If that happens to you, don't blame Godot. For this to be usable, you'll need to make sure you have emacs >27 compiled with native JSON parsing support (not all distros enable it). On arch, emacs27-git from the AUR worked for me.
I use lsp-mode for Rust and JS already on 26 and the performance is fine. My setup has pretty much got everything compiled down to bytecode anyway, so even Elisp stuff runs pretty smoothly. Might test 27 though, since that's what is recommended for Doom anyway.

Supraland stops supporting Linux shortly after leaving GOG entirely
27 June 2020 at 2:56 pm UTC Likes: 10

Quoting: LibertyPaulMAnother case of "if you are not familiar with linux don't port your game to linux", that will just lead to having a bad time. Developing a game for linux is NOT easy and we all have been guilty of spreading the myth that it is.

Frankly my dream is that ultimately one day the OS you run will become irrelevant and then the "native gaming" nonsense goes away for good.
You do understand that the "if you are not already familiar with X, don't become familiar with X" is a really pointless mantra to follow, right? Why learn new things ever? A better idea to follow is to factor in the time and cost of executing a port properly and not doing this "let's hope and see" approach where devs place their trust on a magic export button. If the time and cost investment seem reasonable, then commit to the port.

Developing a Linux game is no harder than developing a Windows game. You can make it harder for yourself or you can make it easier for yourself, but those are choices one makes. Developers deal with the same sorts of choices all the time: do you invest some time and work up front to ensure your architecture holds in the future or do you do a rush job early on and eventually pay back the technical debt.

As for the final point, it is possible that in the future general purpose operating systems may converge to become nearly indistinguishable from one another. However, if that happens because all alternative operating systems ditch their good ideas to mimic the popular but garbage operating system, that's not progress.

Also, "native gaming nonsense"? I take offense to that.

Supraland stops supporting Linux shortly after leaving GOG entirely
27 June 2020 at 12:44 pm UTC Likes: 13

Quoting: Whitewolfe80Thing for me its too late yes our marketshare has increased but almost every single video/article that says nows the time to try linux has one draw back proton its all they talk about and lutris I use both so i am part of the problem. That problem is of course proton has become the clutch we all rely on for games on linux. We have collectively given up on native gaming with the exception of indie games and the one to three games we get from feral a year. We have already seen developers say use the proton version if you want a linux version that attitude has quickly become the norm.
It's definitely an annoying and stupid trend. People don't realize that Proton is putting our eggs in one ever-growing basket that will eventually collapse in on itself. We need game devs that know how to work with Linux that will contribute to the ecosystem.

But on the topic of "collectively giving up on native gaming", I will point out that there are those of us that still totally reject Proton as the future of Linux gaming.

Godot Engine 3.2.2 is out with 2D batching for the GLES2 renderer
26 June 2020 at 4:51 pm UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: Dunc
Quoting: SamsaiI think this release also brings LSP improvements to the crazy people that want to write GDScript in editors like Emacs instead of the integrated editor.
I totally understand why they're doing stuff like this (and GD-Native, to allow other languages), but I wish more people would give GDScript in the integrated editor a chance. For me, it's what makes Godot special.
I've personally written GDScript inside the integrated editor. It's aggressively okay, as in, it works but that's about it. It doesn't match the editing comfort of my Doom Emacs configuration though and LSP should provide all the completion information that I lacked previously to write the code in an external editor. If I was using a "regular" editor like VSCode/Atom/Geany as my main editor I would probably stick to the integrated editor, but it just cannot hope to match the perfect immortal machine that is a precision-tuned, custom configured editor with modal keybindings.

Godot Engine 3.2.2 is out with 2D batching for the GLES2 renderer
26 June 2020 at 3:21 pm UTC Likes: 1

I think this release also brings LSP improvements to the crazy people that want to write GDScript in editors like Emacs instead of the integrated editor.

Attentat 1942, a 'historically-accurate' World War 2 adventure is now on Linux
17 June 2020 at 7:52 pm UTC Likes: 3

Quoting: JarnoHistory is always written by the winners.
Making this comment on this article in particular? Certainly an interesting choice.

If someone is willing to consume some more winners' history, this game seems to be covering Operation Anthropoid, the assassination attempt of Reinhard Heydrich, which is worthwhile to read about. There's also a movie made about said operation called "The Man with the Iron Heart".