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Leadwerks Creation Tool Continues The Push Onto Linux
Posted , 8 November 2013 at 6:36 pm UTC / 5812 views
Another blog post from Josh about the teams effort to bring the Leadwerks game creation kit to Linux.
QuoteThings have gone so remarkably smoothly so far in the process of building Leadwerks Linux
It's really great to see him start off the post so positively.

They went with GTK for the UI of the editor, when asked about why they didn't go with QT the reply was simple:

This means as well that the application itself will look right at home on our installs:
QuoteI greatly prefer the native look and feel GTK gives us, rather than using our own "home made" GUI.  Leadwerks for Linux looks like a Linux application, so you know how to use it right away.

Read the rest here, it's a nice read.

Josh does again point out how annoying graphical driver installs can be when changing graphics card vendors which to be fair I had this problem a few times in Windows, but that was some years back.

I also share this:
QuoteTo put it simply, installing a dual-boot system is not a solved problem.  I recently had one user who wanted to try out Ubuntu, so he made a dual-boot install and it made his Windows driver unbootable.
By driver he means partition of course, this happens to me especially since my PC is UEFI, each time I install Ubuntu I need to then run Boot Recovery as GRUB just fails miserably and that magically fixes it, although it never picks up my tiny Windows 7 emergency partition.

Josh does end it on a highnote though which is great to start and end positively:
QuoteIn conclusion, we've been through the difficult parts of porting a complex application to Linux. Although some annoyances and limitations have been discovered, overall I have found Linux to be a completely viable platform for application development.

I wish more developers shared so much about their porting process to Linux to help others.

Leadwerks is the creation tool that Kickstarted itself to be ported to Linux and got over double it's goal.

I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. A fan of anything techy, and not just Linux stuff.

You can follow my personal blog here.

Comments on this article are now closed.
Lord Avallon commented on 8 November 2013 at 8:03 pm UTC

It´s good to know they are having a smooth progress!

It´s good to know they are having a smooth progress!
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mirv commented on 8 November 2013 at 8:51 pm UTC
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The comments in the post are also interesting reading - Josh is pretty active in them it seems, and it's great to see people offering help to some of the problems he's running across.

It also sheds light on why some people might find Linux a bit daunting to develop on. I've always found Linux better to develop on personally, but it's all just what you're used to I suppose.

The comments in the post are also interesting reading - Josh is pretty active in them it seems, and it's great to see people offering help to some of the problems he's running across. It also sheds light on why some people might find Linux a bit daunting to develop on. I've always found Linux better to develop on personally, but it's all just what you're used to I suppose.
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minj commented on 8 November 2013 at 10:21 pm UTC

QuoteTo put it simply, installing a dual-boot system is not a solved problem.  I recently had one user who wanted to try out Ubuntu, so he made a dual-boot install and it made his Windows driver unbootable.
GRUB installation target selection may be slightly hidden in the Ubuntu Live ISO but it's certainly there. And AFAIK it works just fine by default. It's no wonder the system broke if the aforementioned user selected to install GRUB into a Windows partition.

If we're on that subject I can say I've also had Windows Update 'break' GRUB numerous times. Apparently changing the UUID of a partition that's not supposed to be even visible to Windows is not beneath them. Luckily it wasn't even my main system as I keep it Windows-free for 5 years now.

[quote]To put it simply, installing a dual-boot system is not a solved problem.  I recently had one user who wanted to try out Ubuntu, so he made a dual-boot install and it made his Windows driver unbootable.[/quote] GRUB installation target selection may be slightly hidden in the Ubuntu Live ISO but it's certainly there. And AFAIK it works just fine by default. It's no wonder the system broke if the aforementioned user selected to install GRUB into a Windows partition. If we're on that subject I can say I've also had Windows Update 'break' GRUB numerous times. Apparently changing the UUID of a partition that's not supposed to be even visible to Windows is not beneath them. Luckily it wasn't even my main system as I keep it Windows-free for 5 years now.
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Sabun commented on 9 November 2013 at 4:43 am UTC

Does anyone here use Leadwerks? I'm curious, what are the languages used in Leadwerks?
For example, Unity uses C#, Javascript or Boo. Does Leadwerks use Lua exclusively, or are there are usable languages?

Does anyone here use Leadwerks? I'm curious, what are the languages used in Leadwerks? For example, Unity uses C#, Javascript or Boo. Does Leadwerks use Lua exclusively, or are there are usable languages?
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s_d commented on 9 November 2013 at 6:34 am UTC
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C++ for engine work, Lua for scripting, if I recall correctly.

C++ for engine work, Lua for scripting, if I recall correctly.
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HMmm commented on 9 November 2013 at 11:51 am UTC

The Develop of this is a newb i don't think it's going to work out well

The Develop of this is a newb i don't think it's going to work out well
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mirv commented on 9 November 2013 at 4:43 pm UTC
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Quote from HMmmThe Develop of this is a newb i don't think it's going to work out well

Given that it was funded quite comfortably from Kickstarter, I'd say that there's at the very least a high level of interest. As for working out or not, well that's up to how developers find the tools, documentation, and support.

I wouldn't exactly call the guy a "newb", although he's certainly relatively new to Linux development. Still, from all I've seen he's gone into it with both eyes open, and is putting in a lot of effort. You can't really start off in an unfamiliar OS and expect everything to be immediately perfect; he's going to have to learn a few things and put in research time to determine the best way forward, and the updates show he's doing just that.
So let's hope he makes something decent, and gives a bit more competition to the unity folk.

Disclaimer: I don't really have an opinion too much on someone I've not met, nor tried their products, but I'm quite hoping he will succeed because I've long been wanting more native development possibilites under Linux, not just a final native binary.

[quote=Quote from HMmm]The Develop of this is a newb i don't think it's going to work out well[/quote] Given that it was funded quite comfortably from Kickstarter, I'd say that there's at the very least a high level of interest. As for working out or not, well that's up to how developers find the tools, documentation, and support. I wouldn't exactly call the guy a "newb", although he's certainly relatively new to Linux development. Still, from all I've seen he's gone into it with both eyes open, and is putting in a lot of effort. You can't really start off in an unfamiliar OS and expect everything to be immediately perfect; he's going to have to learn a few things and put in research time to determine the best way forward, and the updates show he's doing just that. So let's hope he makes something decent, and gives a bit more competition to the unity folk. Disclaimer: I don't really have an opinion too much on someone I've not met, nor tried their products, but I'm quite hoping he will succeed because I've long been wanting more native development possibilites under Linux, not just a final native binary.
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Speedster commented on 11 November 2013 at 1:03 am UTC
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Quote from mirv
It also sheds light on why some people might find Linux a bit daunting to develop on. I've always found Linux better to develop on personally, but it's all just what you're used to I suppose.

It's not just what you're used to, but partly your personality. Some of us are allergic to trying to troubleshoot anything involving black box components (proprietary, no source, so frustrating if things don't "just work), and would not be in the software development industry at all if it weren't for open platforms like Linux. That's not to say I've been able to avoid black-box components and tools altogether as a Linux developer, but it's not prevalent enough that I've stopped having fun with all the good parts of my job.

[quote=Quote from mirv] It also sheds light on why some people might find Linux a bit daunting to develop on. I've always found Linux better to develop on personally, but it's all just what you're used to I suppose.[/quote] It's not just what you're used to, but partly your personality. Some of us are allergic to trying to troubleshoot anything involving black box components (proprietary, no source, so frustrating if things don't "just work), and would not be in the software development industry at all if it weren't for open platforms like Linux. That's not to say I've been able to avoid black-box components and tools altogether as a Linux developer, but it's not prevalent enough that I've stopped having fun with all the good parts of my job.
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