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Original Natural Selection Source Code Now On Github

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The original Natural Selection modification of Half Life has been put onto github by the developers, pretty nice move.

Right now it seems sketchy at best to do anything with it as some of their original headers are in place like this:
Quote//======== (C) Copyright 2002 Charles G. Cleveland All rights reserved. =========
//
// The copyright to the contents herein is the property of Charles G. Cleveland.
// The contents may be used and/or copied only with the written permission of
// Charles G. Cleveland, or in accordance with the terms and conditions stipulated in
// the agreement/contract under which the contents have been supplied.


Given that it is a public repository that's incompatible with githubs own rules, it may have been an oversight by the developer so lets us hope they remove the restrictions and have not only a Linux port of the original Natural Selection, but keep it updated too.

Github link: https://github.com/unknownworlds/NS Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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The comments on this article are closed.
8 comments

Kamil 19 Jan, 2014
QuoteYou're under no obligation to choose a license. It's your right not to include one with your code or project, but please be aware of the implications. Generally speaking, the absence of a license means that the default copyright laws apply. This means that you retain all rights to your source code and that nobody else may reproduce, distribute, or create derivative works from your work.
Even if this is what you intend, if you publish your source code in a public repository on GitHub, you have accepted the Terms of Service which do allow other GitHub users some rights. Specifically, you allow others to view and fork your repository.
https://help.github.com/articles/open-source-licensing

Quote[ol]
  • We claim no intellectual property rights over the material you provide to the Service. Your profile and materials uploaded remain yours. However, by setting your pages to be viewed publicly, you agree to allow others to view your Content. By setting your repositories to be viewed publicly, you agree to allow others to view and fork your repositories.

  • [/ol]
    https://help.github.com/articles/github-terms-of-service

    I don't think it violates github's policy. It doesn't require the code to be open source, sadly.
    Liam Dawe 19 Jan, 2014
    Oh really?
    Quote By setting your repositories to be viewed publicly, you agree to allow others to view and fork your repositories.
    Their headers say otherwise since to copy it or "fork it" you would need written permission which is contrary to github public repo rules.
    berarma 19 Jan, 2014
    May I ask where did you get that idea about github public repositories from? The readme in the repository doesn't suggest an error in the copyright notice.
    Liam Dawe 19 Jan, 2014
    Quote from berarmaMay I ask where did you get that idea about github public repositories from? The readme in the repository doesn't suggest an error in the copyright notice.
    Huh? It's not a random idea about github repos, it's githubs rules.

    There is an issue open to discuss it, as of yet no reply
    https://github.com/unknownworlds/NS/issues/1
    berarma 19 Jan, 2014
    Quote from liamdaweOh really?
    Quote By setting your repositories to be viewed publicly, you agree to allow others to view and fork your repositories.
    Their headers say otherwise since to copy it or "fork it" you would need written permission which is contrary to github public repo rules.

    They're giving away some of those rights on github but not all of them and they're not forced to change their copyright notices neither.
    berarma 19 Jan, 2014
    Quote from liamdawe
    Quote from berarmaMay I ask where did you get that idea about github public repositories from? The readme in the repository doesn't suggest an error in the copyright notice.
    Huh? It's not a random idea about github repos, it's githubs rules.

    There is an issue open to discuss it, as of yet no reply
    https://github.com/unknownworlds/NS/issues/1

    I see, I wouldn't set my hopes too high on this since it's the developer's will really.
    Kamil 20 Jan, 2014
    Hmm, it's a bit unclear whether forking is copying. However, by accepting Github's terms of service, it seems to be allowed, no matter what the header says. However, you still can't do anything useful with it, just browse the code, that's right. It would be nice if Github provided more info for the users what such situations really mean. Can you send patches to such a forked project? Can people download it?
    berarma 20 Jan, 2014
    Quote from KamilHmm, it's a bit unclear whether forking is copying. However, by accepting Github's terms of service, it seems to be allowed, no matter what the header says. However, you still can't do anything useful with it, just browse the code, that's right. It would be nice if Github provided more info for the users what such situations really mean. Can you send patches to such a forked project? Can people download it?

    A fork in github is a git clone operation, it can involve copying and downloading, I guess we can clone the repository and even use it for private purposes but nothing else. I think github is just trying to prevent to be sued themselves, but everyone else will have to look after his/her own actions. There's been some debate about the dangers of these github licensing issues. I try to stay away from code not properly licensed for reuse.
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