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Here’s the news you have been desperate to hear, Deus Ex: Mankind Divided [Official Site] is officially heading to SteamOS & Linux and it’s being ported by Feral Interactive.

Deus Ex: Mankind Divided is coming to Mac and Linux this year. Embrace what you've become. pic.twitter.com/0AS5HCQpaI

— Feral Interactive (@feralgames) September 15, 2016

They have confirmed the game will release this year, but they aren’t being any clearer than that right now. Could it be my early Christmas present? Oh please say it is–although even sooner than that would be great!

From the Press Release:

Quote“Over the past 16 years, the Deus Ex games have been leaders in game design, expertly blending innovative storytelling and gameplay within a compelling game world,” said David Stephen, Managing Director at Feral Interactive. “Deus Ex: Mankind Divided takes it to the next level, giving players an unprecedented degree of freedom in a spectacular cyberpunk setting, where their actions shape both narrative and gameplay.”


They will announce the required PC specifications closer to the launch date.

Incredible news! I played through the previous game years ago and thoroughly enjoyed it. So I am already a fan of the series.

It’s worth noting that reviews for the game overall on Steam are "Mixed", mainly due to microtransactions and an apparent abrupt ending. As usual though, I reserve all my thoughts on it until I actually play it.

It’s not cheap at £39.99, so at release you may need to dig a little deep into those pockets of yours. It also has a £24.99 season pass, so hopefully given that price it means extra actual story content will come too.

It’s also one of a select few games that you can buy bundled with a Steam Controller, so if you don’t own one it’s a chance to get some money off buying them together.

About the game

The year is 2029, and mechanically augmented humans have now been deemed outcasts, living a life of complete and total segregation from the rest of society.

Now an experienced covert operative, Adam Jensen is forced to operate in a world that has grown to despise his kind. Armed with a new arsenal of state-of-the-art weapons and augmentations, he must choose the right approach, along with who to trust, in order to unravel a vast worldwide conspiracy.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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cxpher@gmail.com 16 Sep, 2016
Quoting: boltronics
Quoting: m2mg2I think a lot of people are blaming OpenGL for performance issues that aren't really a problem with OpenGL. The biggest problem is that no one is really coding for good performing OpenGL, they are coding for DirectX.
Exactly this.

You know who is coding really good performing OpenGL? Id Software. Forget Doom as it's unplayable DRM junk, but Wolfenstein: The New Order and Wolfenstein: The Old Blood run great under Wine since it can pass through the bulk of the OpenGL calls directly. The performance of these games under GNU/Linux is amazing. Far better than many native GNU/Linux releases!

If Id software made GNU/Linux games, they'd be 1st class. Too bad they aren't interested.

Strange Bethesda don't publish for SteamOS really. I can understand Ubisoft and EA since they have their own DRM client/stores they would have to port and support as well, but Bethesda really have nothing holding them back and the work to port games that already work flawlessly under Wine would be almost nothing. It's like they don't like money or something.

Bethesda does not realize how much money there is here. Doom would be a cinch for them to port. And the amount of Linux/SteamOS users who would pick it up would more than make up for the porting effort of a few days. Heck, it's even Vulkan ready.

It's like you said, they either don't like money or are nuts.


Last edited by cxpher@gmail.com on 16 September 2016 at 4:53 pm UTC
RussianNeuroMancer 16 Sep, 2016
If they make Human Revolution port I will buy it at full price.
throgh 16 Sep, 2016
Quoting: valgusk
Quoting: throghThis will be another DRM-release on Steam, so no chance to buy this one for me. :)

I agree that everybody has their principles, but Linux users are so good at their pickiness that it makes me wonder why devs even bother trying to port their games. DRM, microtransations, paid DLC, ...
Not only we are less in numbers, but 7bigger part of us reject purchases too easily. I don't like these problems either, but I will always buy a great game made for Linux even when devs can see the community hostility that clearly. DRM? Their right, people do pirate games too much. Microtransactions? Just don't buy them, thats the best way to battle them. Paid dlc? You are offered something that was rejected from original games most likely due to lack of time/money - profits like these are better than making the game 1.5x more expensive and you don't have to buy them either.

Why not just buy games we want to play for now until Linux is stable as a dev choice and then battle secondary wars?

That's easy to answer but just also my perspective: When accepting all the modern rules and so-called standards I turn my installation of Linux in nothing more but another Windows. DLC? DRM? Microtransactions? Blobbed drivers and protected software within repositories? That's ruining the games and Linux at all, making especially the games to nothing more but a nice looking demo. And the forced online connections turns the fun in nothing more than an amusement park where I have to pay for every step, even watching an attraction costs money. Even not to mention that modern hardware is the opposite of freedom - UEFI anyone, protected firmware on NVidia-cards. So better to stay at old games for me, following up principles: DRM? Not with me! :) Otherwise the so-called "battle" is lost before it even has begun already!
tuubi 16 Sep, 2016
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Quoting: throgh... protected firmware on NVidia-cards.
You're free to stick to your principles, but all major CPU and GPU vendors run proprietary firmware/microcode in their hardware, not just Nvidia. Your choice of drivers makes no difference either.
PublicNuisance 16 Sep, 2016
My money will be waiting for them. Hopefully more Square Enix games will come to Linux such as Sleeping Dogs.
boltronics 17 Sep, 2016
Quoting: tuubi
Quoting: throgh... protected firmware on NVidia-cards.
You're free to stick to your principles, but all major CPU and GPU vendors run proprietary firmware/microcode in their hardware, not just Nvidia. Your choice of drivers makes no difference either.
Sorry, but you either misread or are mistaken. Of the big three PC GPU vendors, only Nvidia implements "protected firmware". That is to say, only drivers signed by Nvidia are permitted to talk to the GPU's proprietary firmware. That's why free software drivers on modern Nvidia cards is impossible to fully implement without Nvidia's full corporation.

And Nvidia doesn't fully cooperate.

Eventually (well after the card release date) they will (or at least have so far) release a firmware that does permit unsigned drivers to talk to it, but the firmware has been partially crippled so it cannot function fully. To the best of my understanding, it is not technically possible (short of finding a way to bypass these digital restrictions) for free software drivers to ever match Nvidia's proprietary drivers. Contrast this to AMD and Intel, where it makes no sense for them to do this on GNU/Linux since the primary drivers for these vendors - the recommended drivers for most people - are the free software drivers.

So if using free software drivers is important to you, Nvidia is a really bad choice, and will always be a bad choice as long as they keep the requirement for signed drivers. Don't give them your support.
tuubi 17 Sep, 2016
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Quoting: boltronics
Quoting: tuubi
Quoting: throgh... protected firmware on NVidia-cards.
You're free to stick to your principles, but all major CPU and GPU vendors run proprietary firmware/microcode in their hardware, not just Nvidia. Your choice of drivers makes no difference either.
Sorry, but you either misread or are mistaken.
I'm not so sure. I just think that for most of us protected firmware isn't much more of a problem than proprietary firmware blobs in general. As long as they provide working drivers, from a purely non-ideological standpoint it's all good.

Quoting: boltronicsSo if using free software drivers is important to you, Nvidia is a really bad choice, and will always be a bad choice as long as they keep the requirement for signed drivers. Don't give them your support.
I still think this is just about picking what you consider acceptable in your system. You draw the line at that particular detail, others think anything short of of fully open hardware is evil. Nvidia is probably slightly worse than the competition if you feel strongly about these issues though, that I'll agree with.
boltronics 17 Sep, 2016
Quoting: tuubiI'm not so sure. I just think that for most of us protected firmware isn't much more of a problem than proprietary firmware blobs in general. As long as they provide working drivers, from a purely non-ideological standpoint it's all good.
Well I just got back from a Software Freedom Day meet-up, so... :)

Quoting: tuubiI still think this is just about picking what you consider acceptable in your system. You draw the line at that particular detail, others think anything short of of fully open hardware is evil.
That's true. I understand not everyone is as concerned about using free software, and it's up to the individual to make the call. I'll generally accept proprietary games since I only use them temporarily (but won't pay full price for games with nasty DRM or other mechanisms that disrespect or subjugate the user more than is typical), but I won't accept proprietary drivers since the OS would run those most/all of the time.

I do reluctantly accept proprietary firmware/microcode, but wouldn't if a 100% free microcode was available for modern hardware that can do what I want. Unlike some people, I don't care if it's loaded from the HDD or from flash embedded in the hardware (although many free software projects make the later much easier to deal with) - the risk is about the same either way.

For stuff not related to games and entertainment, I use a Lenovo X60 running Libreboot, which has 100% free software for the BIOS and HDD storage contents (which contains a dual-boot GuixSD and Parabola setup). The only proprietary code on the laptop I am aware of is in the HDD firmware, which I am not aware of any solution for.

I am also a backer of the EOMA68 micro-desktop and laptop on crowdsupply.com, so might switch to that later... although then instead of dealing with HDD firmware, I would need to deal with the firmware embedded in the SD card microcontroller. :)
m2mg2 17 Sep, 2016
accidental post


Last edited by m2mg2 on 17 September 2016 at 4:44 pm UTC
m2mg2 17 Sep, 2016
Quoting: boltronics
Quoting: tuubiI'm not so sure. I just think that for most of us protected firmware isn't much more of a problem than proprietary firmware blobs in general. As long as they provide working drivers, from a purely non-ideological standpoint it's all good.
Well I just got back from a Software Freedom Day meet-up, so... :)

Quoting: tuubiI still think this is just about picking what you consider acceptable in your system. You draw the line at that particular detail, others think anything short of of fully open hardware is evil.
That's true. I understand not everyone is as concerned about using free software, and it's up to the individual to make the call. I'll generally accept proprietary games since I only use them temporarily (but won't pay full price for games with nasty DRM or other mechanisms that disrespect or subjugate the user more than is typical), but I won't accept proprietary drivers since the OS would run those most/all of the time.

I do reluctantly accept proprietary firmware/microcode, but wouldn't if a 100% free microcode was available for modern hardware that can do what I want. Unlike some people, I don't care if it's loaded from the HDD or from flash embedded in the hardware (although many free software projects make the later much easier to deal with) - the risk is about the same either way.

For stuff not related to games and entertainment, I use a Lenovo X60 running Libreboot, which has 100% free software for the BIOS and HDD storage contents (which contains a dual-boot GuixSD and Parabola setup). The only proprietary code on the laptop I am aware of is in the HDD firmware, which I am not aware of any solution for.

I am also a backer of the EOMA68 micro-desktop and laptop on crowdsupply.com, so might switch to that later... although then instead of dealing with HDD firmware, I would need to deal with the firmware embedded in the SD card microcontroller. :)

I use Nvidia, but I'm waiting on AMDGPU to mature. If the performance comes up to par, Nvidia will get dropped quick. I love AMD, the performance just hasn't been there. It actually wasn't that bad with Catalyst, aside from having to patch the driver source before compiling it. With my old R9 270x there was only one game I couldn't play, all the rest performed fine. I haven't actually tried AMDGPU, just going by what I've heard. Also I got about $1000 invested between my 980 GTX and my GSYNC monitor to jump ship right now. The first game I go to install that prompts for privilege elevation to install, instant refund request.


Last edited by m2mg2 on 17 September 2016 at 4:44 pm UTC
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