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Steam isn't perfect, that's for sure and one particular issue that constantly comes up is how some developers have been abusing the release date display.

Previously, it seems developers were able to change their upcoming release date whenever they wanted to. Some took advantage of this, to constantly ensure their game showed up on the first two pages of the Coming Soon section on Steam. The issue is that it constantly pushed games with legitimate release dates back, sometimes multiple pages of searching. I saw it all the time and it was a massive nuisance, when clearly a lot of these games had no intention to release then.

Going by this Reddit post, which included the image below, it seems like Valve are finally starting to do something about this:

Going by that, it seems Valve will now be requiring at least some developers to contact them if they want to delay their release date. While a lot of people do value a more open store, there has to be limits somewhere.

Hat tip to Mr. Doomguy in Discord.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Misc, Steam
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Purple Library Guy 8 Aug, 2019
Quoting: EikeI feel you're hurting your point by using the wrong term.
I feel I'm not. We're really at a place in the discussion where there's not much point going further. I get that some people are upset by my use of the term and think it's out of place. I disagree. (shrug)

Quoting: EikeGreed is not the same as seeking your own advantage. Yes, most of us are often driven by monetary advantages (which is probably good enough to prove your original point). Greed is the exzessive, antisocial variant, which I don't think most people adhere to.
Clearly we could have a very subtle semantic argument about this. The distinction I'm seeing is not really in meaning, just that one part of our socialization says "greed is bad" and another part says "seeking your own advantage, entrepreneurialism etc. is good" and so we figure they can't be the same thing, because one is bad and the other is good. But if you just read the sentence "Greed is not the same as seeking your own advantage"--well, what is it then?
Perhaps we could come up with a decent, reasonably well defined distinction between bad greed and good not-exactly-greed, but I would suggest that it's subtle enough to make use of the term pretty defensible . . . especially since nobody seems to quite agree what they want to call it instead.

In any case, I couldn't really have used a different term. The point I was making was in reply to someone accusing game developers of greed--not accusing them of enlightened self-interest. And I was saying "Yeah, so?" Trying to mess around with other words would have destroyed the whole point.


Last edited by Purple Library Guy on 8 August 2019 at 7:54 am UTC
Eike 8 Aug, 2019
Quoting: Purple Library GuyBut if you just read the sentence "Greed is not the same as seeking your own advantage"--well, what is it then?
Perhaps we could come up with a decent, reasonably well defined distinction between bad greed and good not-exactly-greed, but I would suggest that it's subtle enough to make use of the term pretty defensible . . . especially since nobody seems to quite agree what they want to call it instead.

Let me give it a try:

Everbody deserves its share.
The border between being seekingyouradvantagely and greedy is if you're trying to get "your share" (whatever that may be) or if you're trying to get way more than "your share" (whatever that may be) - and thus eating away from other people's share.

It's clearly hard to say what's on which side (starting with the huge problem of defining "your share" in different parts of the world), but I don't think there's any subtility to the overall difference.

It's "I want what I deserve" contra "I want what you deserve".


Last edited by Eike on 8 August 2019 at 7:53 am UTC
Purple Library Guy 8 Aug, 2019
Quoting: Eike
Quoting: Purple Library GuyBut if you just read the sentence "Greed is not the same as seeking your own advantage"--well, what is it then?
Perhaps we could come up with a decent, reasonably well defined distinction between bad greed and good not-exactly-greed, but I would suggest that it's subtle enough to make use of the term pretty defensible . . . especially since nobody seems to quite agree what they want to call it instead.

Let me give it a try:

Everbody deserves its share.
The border between being seekingyouradvantagely and greedy is if you're trying to get "your share" (whatever that may be) or if you're trying to get way more than "your share" (whatever that may be) - and thus eating away from other people's share.

It's clearly hard to say what's on which side (starting with the huge problem of defining "your share" in different parts of the world), but I don't think there's any subtility to the overall difference.

It's "I want what I deserve" contra "I want what you deserve".
If you're going to define greed as anything beyond just trying for "your share", then I think it's going to include a lot of what some of the other people here want to exclude. And it's certainly going to include about all the people I was talking about in my original post that got people annoyed, thus meaning there was no point in bugging me about it.
Let's see . . . one might distinguish greed as the refusal to weight other factors such as causing distress to others when deciding whether to pursue a gain, or something like that. But then, some people are clearly greedy and yet have limits to what they would do for a buck. It's tricky.


Last edited by Purple Library Guy on 8 August 2019 at 8:08 am UTC
Eike 8 Aug, 2019
Quoting: Purple Library GuyIf you're going to define greed as anything beyond just trying for "your share", then I think it's going to include a lot of what some of the other people here want to exclude. And it's certainly going to include about all the people I was talking about in my original post that got people annoyed, thus meaning there was no point in bugging me about it.

I didn't expect you to be "bugged" by discussing terms.

IMO, "greedy" is pejorative and not suitable to be applied generally to about all people.
You can say, me (and others) were bugged by this usage.

Quoting: Purple Library GuyLet's see . . . one might distinguish greed as the refusal to weight other factors such as causing distress to others when deciding whether to pursue a gain, or something like that. But then, some people are clearly greedy and yet have limits to what they would do for a buck. It's tricky.

I'd be fine with that, yes. And I wouldn't say that only those people could be called greedy that have no limits at all.

Would you still say that all/nearly all people are greedy by this definition of yours?

PS: But, if you like, we can stop it here. You saw people being unhappy with everybody being called greedy. I guess most of us still got an idea what you were up to.


Last edited by Eike on 8 August 2019 at 8:13 am UTC
kuhpunkt 8 Aug, 2019
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: Eike
Quoting: Purple Library GuyBut if you just read the sentence "Greed is not the same as seeking your own advantage"--well, what is it then?
Perhaps we could come up with a decent, reasonably well defined distinction between bad greed and good not-exactly-greed, but I would suggest that it's subtle enough to make use of the term pretty defensible . . . especially since nobody seems to quite agree what they want to call it instead.

Let me give it a try:

Everbody deserves its share.
The border between being seekingyouradvantagely and greedy is if you're trying to get "your share" (whatever that may be) or if you're trying to get way more than "your share" (whatever that may be) - and thus eating away from other people's share.

It's clearly hard to say what's on which side (starting with the huge problem of defining "your share" in different parts of the world), but I don't think there's any subtility to the overall difference.

It's "I want what I deserve" contra "I want what you deserve".
If you're going to define greed as anything beyond just trying for "your share", then I think it's going to include a lot of what some of the other people here want to exclude. And it's certainly going to include about all the people I was talking about in my original post that got people annoyed, thus meaning there was no point in bugging me about it.
Let's see . . . one might distinguish greed as the refusal to weight other factors such as causing distress to others when deciding whether to pursue a gain, or something like that. But then, some people are clearly greedy and yet have limits to what they would do for a buck. It's tricky.

Greed is wanting more of everything even though you already have more than you need.

And no matter the semantics... you accuse everybody of being greedy. That's bad.
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