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After multiple streaming services announced they were dropping their quality for a while, to help internet providers cope with so many more at home, Valve have started speaking about their own ways to manage bandwidth too.

In the blog post on Steam, Valve mentioned how they've now adjusted download priorities so that games you've not played recently will move from using off-peak timings for auto-updates to spreading them over multiple days. Only games you've played in the last three days will update immediately. This doesn't change you clicking on a game that needs an update, as it will begin to update as normal when you request it. They also said they're looking into "additional solutions to help on our side" so we might see more download options in the Steam client eventually.

Valve's other suggestions were (help link here):

  • Schedule auto-update windows! This will ensure that Steam doesn’t start updating a game while you’re in the middle of your work day.
  • If you don’t play a game in your library often, you can keep it installed but choose to no longer download automatic updates.
  • You can self-throttle your own connection to Steam. This might ease the load on your network connection, and may help ease bandwidth loads if network traffic in your area needs to be reduced.
  • Take advantage of Library Folders settings, so you can move infrequently-played games from an SSD to a storage HDD. This is usually better for you (and your bandwidth) rather than uninstalling the game and needing to re-download it later.

Given that Steam is such a massive platform, and it continues to break records, it's nice to see them react and try to relieve a little pressure.

Personally, I really dislike auto updating on my Library. I use the auto-update window feature, set to 4-5AM when my PC is never on so that games and software installed through Steam only update when I manually tell them too. Still, having a proper option in Steam to have no auto updates sure would be nice. You can do that on a per-game basis as noted by Valve, but not for your entire library which is a bit annoying.

Why? For me it's not just a matter of bandwidth use, it's also control—if a game updates I want to know so I can go in and see what's going on with it. When you have 100s of games, it's hard to keep track if they all update constantly and it's not surprising people forget about so many fantastic games when that happens. Perhaps fine-grained controls is what Valve will give us at some point, could be part of the additional solutions they mentioned.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Steam, Valve
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Nanobang 31 Mar
Everything I do online conserves bandwidth, but not by choice. Stuck with AT&T DSL I've got so little bandwidth that nothing auto-updates on my system without my giving it the go-ahead. :/

In the case of Steam, I only run it when I'm going to play a game, so --- unless I'm going to play a multi-player online game --- I have things update in the background while I'm playing something. If it's really big (like Borderlands-OMG-it's-dead-whale-bloated-fat 3) I might leave Steam on when I go to bed and shut it down when I get up in the morning.


Last edited by Nanobang on 31 March 2020 at 11:42 am UTC
The_Aquabat 31 Mar
Liam Dawe
Pinguino
QuoteAfter multiple streaming services announced they were dropping their quality for a while, to help internet providers cope with so many more at home

What's the source on that?
I'm really surprised anyone hasn't heard about it. Practically all video streaming: disney, amazon, netflix and so on are reducing stream quality on Europe for a while. It's reported on basically any news site.

https://gritdaily.com/internet-based-brands-struggling-during-coronavirus/

Not only in Europe but also here in South America they are doing the same... so this is probably worldwide.

https://www.lanacion.com.ar/economia/netflix-bajara-calidad-del-streaming-30-dias-nid2346451


Last edited by The_Aquabat on 31 March 2020 at 2:52 pm UTC
The_Aquabat 31 Mar
NanobangEverything I do online conserves bandwidth, but not by choice. Stuck with AT&T DSL I've got so little bandwidth that nothing auto-updates on my system without my giving it the go-ahead. :/


also me I have a 12megabit DSL connection so I'm not sure how saving bandwidth from my end could improve anything at all.
lejimster 2 Apr
stanSteam should NOT force game updates on us. If a game....
I guess thatd be fair for single player games, but if there is a multiplayer element ideally you want all your players on the same version. I must admit it is quite annoying all the frequent updates for games you may have finished and don't even plan to go back to. So I think Valve made a smart choice at this time to conserve bandwidth.
stan 2 Apr
lejimsterI guess thatd be fair for single player games, but if there is a multiplayer element ideally you want all your players on the same version.
Yes, probably (although a group of friends could decide to stay on an older version for whatever reason).
But it can be the game that detects if the player is using an old version, only when they try to play online, instead of bothering solo/split-screen players and wasting resources.
chr 3 Apr
I wanted to mention a DL-related feature I would like in Steam - shutdown/sleep/close_steam after downloads finish - a functionality that torrent programs usually have. I would be very happy also if I would have more control and I could just via CLI run Steam specifically to update stuff and then it exits when done and I can chain a shutdown command after that (like I often do with other updates - sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade -y && sudo flatpak update -y && sudo snap refresh && sudo systemctl halt).
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