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3dSen PC will turn classic NES games into 3D on June 19

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3dSen PC is quite magical. An emulator that not only runs classic NES games, it changes the way you play them and it now has an Early Access release date.

Arriving with Linux support on June 19, it's been in development for quite a few years. It takes a lot more time than usually because of what it's doing. It makes each game 3D, giving you an entirely new perspective and integrates save states and Steam Input for easy gamepad support.

Over the last few months, Geod Studio have been providing regular Beta builds and it is genuinely impressive. With a list of games supported that continues to grow. Here's a quick test I did recently to show it in action:

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It really is quite incredible. Such a fun idea for an emulator. It's one thing to keep seriously old games running, it's another to change how they're rendered entirely.

You can follow 3dSen PC on Steam.

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12 comments
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apprentix 19 May
I got the VR version of 3DSen from https://geod.itch.io/3dnes and it came with a Steam key. There use to be a download link but it has been removed.
Dunc 19 May
That's pretty impressive. The video thumbnail of the title screen doesn't do it justice.

(Now someone do the C64 or Spectrum. The NES wasn't really a thing in Europe.)
tuubi 19 May
DuncThe NES wasn't really a thing in Europe.
Maybe that was just your corner of Europe? Plenty of people had them up here. I had a proper computer of course but I had several Nintendo (and Sega) console plebs in my circle of friends back then.



Console fans please don't murder me, that pleb bit was a joke.
dpanter 19 May
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DuncThe NES wasn't really a thing in Europe.
It most definitely was a thing.

The video game crash of 1983 hit USA hard, but didn't register much in Europe. The massive NES sales in USA (34 million) was a turning point in history where the western video game industry exploded back into life. Imagine if things had gone the other way...

The NES launched in EU late 1986, over three years after Japan and nearly a whole year after USA, and the next generation was already looming. The belated launch, distribution issues, lack of marketing, being second fiddle to Sega in the market did nothing to boost sales.

Eventually Nintendo stepped up to properly distribute the NES in EU, but by then it was the 90's and the SNES was knocking at the door. Nintendo must love distribution issues as they keep having them with every damn console...
The NES eventually sold well in EU, while not quite matching the Master System. NES ~6 million, MS ~7 million.


From my Swedish point of view, everyone and his mother had a Nintendo console and Sega barely registered on the radar.


Anyway 3dSen is awesome.
Dunc 19 May
dpanter
DuncThe NES wasn't really a thing in Europe.
It most definitely was a thing.
When I say “a thing”, I mean it wasn't the phenomenon it was in Japan or North America. 6 million sales is nothing compared to the 34 million it sold in the US.

QuoteThe video game crash of 1983 hit USA hard, but didn't register much in Europe. The massive NES sales in USA (34 million) was a turning point in history where the western video game industry exploded back into life.
The crash did register, but it didn't hit as hard. The European games market had already begun turning away from the first-generation consoles towards 8-bit computers by 1983, and North America's difficulties just accelerated that shift. At the time, it felt more like a generational change rather than a catastrophe. And, with little competition from either the US or Japan, the mid-'80s were actually the European games industry's gold-rush years. Ocean Software (now Bandai Namco UK) and Infogrames (now Atari) were founded in 1983. By '85, Ocean had the Konami arcade licence as well as a bunch of major movie tie-ins. Business was booming.

It's actually possible that if Nintendo had launched here in '83 or '84, soon after Japan, they might have found an even more receptive market than the US, but I doubt it. The main impact of the crash in Europe, although it's hard to believe today, was that consoles were seen as a thing of the past. Remember, computer games were being sold in filling stations and newsagents for pocket money prices at this stage. Why buy a console when you could get 20 games for the price of one cartridge? (And convince your parents that a computer would help with your school work, too. )

QuoteThe NES launched in EU late 1986, over three years after Japan and nearly a whole year after USA, and the next generation was already looming. The belated launch, distribution issues, lack of marketing, being second fiddle to Sega in the market did nothing to boost sales.

Eventually Nintendo stepped up to properly distribute the NES in EU, but by then it was the 90's and the SNES was knocking at the door.
Yes, that's pretty much it. By late 1986, the Japanese consoles had a well-established, highly talented, indigenous European industry to contend with. And the next generation of home computers looming on the horizon. They were just too late.

The best way I can describe how the NES and Sega Master System were seen by the European market is that they were a bit like the “PSOne” that Sony relaunched after the PS2 came out: outdated technology for younger kids who might not care that it wasn't the latest thing. Toys, really. (Which seems ridiculous when the whole market is games, but if you remember the PSOne, I hope you understand what I'm saying.) Less so with the SMS, because Sega was smart enough to emphasize is arcade connections*, which is possibly why Europe is one of the few markets it “won”. But both had to deal with the pricing problem, the established European developers (what good is a machine you can't play Starglider or Paradroid on?), and the rise of the 16 bit computers.

Sure, both had managed to save some face by 1993, and there's no doubt that the 16-bit generation very firmly re-established console gaming in Europe (assisted by the collapse of Commodore and Atari), but the 8-bit consoles always played second-fiddle to home computers.

*The only 8-bit console game I've ever played on real hardware was Space Harrier, back in 1987. And yes, it was better than any of the computer ports. (Although, much to my disappointment ever since, the friend who owned the console didn't have the 3D glasses. )
The_Aquabat 20 May
anyone knows when retroarch will release on Steam? if they could integrate remote play together on to Nes games that would be really awesome!
Cyril 20 May
I don't know why but I thought that was a free software project or something, still nice.
It seems there isn't alternatives, for now at least.
Eike 20 May
DuncIt's actually possible that if Nintendo had launched here in '83 or '84, soon after Japan, they might have found an even more receptive market than the US, but I doubt it. The main impact of the crash in Europe, although it's hard to believe today, was that consoles were seen as a thing of the past. Remember, computer games were being sold in filling stations and newsagents for pocket money prices at this stage. Why buy a console when you could get 20 games for the price of one cartridge? (And convince your parents that a computer would help with your school work, too. )

I heard games were even cheaper on school yards, which was an important reason for kids to prefer them over consoles as well... ;)


Last edited by Eike on 20 May 2020 at 11:03 am UTC
tuubi 20 May
Eike
DuncIt's actually possible that if Nintendo had launched here in '83 or '84, soon after Japan, they might have found an even more receptive market than the US, but I doubt it. The main impact of the crash in Europe, although it's hard to believe today, was that consoles were seen as a thing of the past. Remember, computer games were being sold in filling stations and newsagents for pocket money prices at this stage. Why buy a console when you could get 20 games for the price of one cartridge? (And convince your parents that a computer would help with your school work, too. )

I heard games were even cheaper on school yards, which was an important reason for kids to prefer them over consoles as well... ;)
About the price of an empty cassette if you had a double deck?
Eike 20 May
tuubi
EikeI heard games were even cheaper on school yards, which was an important reason for kids to prefer them over consoles as well... ;)
About the price of an empty cassette if you had a double deck?

It was floppy discs for the computers that were far spread here in Germany (mainly Commodore 64), but yes, that kind of price.

(I had an MSX and was exchanging games via mail. The letter kind of mail, you know... )


Last edited by Eike on 20 May 2020 at 12:16 pm UTC
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