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Raspberry Pi 4 goes 8GB, plus new 64bit OS

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The highly versatile Raspberry Pi 4 now has a new 8GB model and their official Debian-based operating system has a new 64bit version for you to play with. From running retro games, to making it into a whole gaming device with a screen and everything, the Raspberry Pi is seriously cool and now thanks to the bigger RAM in the 8GB model it can do even more fun things for you.

A model that was long rumoured but they had trouble doing it, until now. They said that while the BCM2711 chip used in the Raspberry Pi 4 actually supports up to 16GB of LPDDR4 SDRAM, the barrier was that lack of a 8GB LPDDR4 package which didn't exist but Micron stepped up with a suitable part for them.

Some adjustments were made to accomodate it, as it needed higher peak currents. So the power supply components have been shuffled around, and a removal of a switch-mode power supply from the right side with a new switcher next to the USB-C power connection. It's available right now for $75.

The Raspberry Pi OS (formerly known as Raspbian) also now has a 64bit version in Beta to fully take advantage of the extra memory. They have a video up about the latest changes to the OS as a whole for them May Update which we've included below:

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Read more about it and pick one up on the official Raspberry Pi website.

If any of our readers are planning to pick up the RPi 8GB and / or are tinkering with a current one for some kind of gaming, do let us know what you're up to in the comments. Would love to see.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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44 comments
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Dedale
legluondunetI have a raspberry pi 3b+ 2Go and a raspberry pi 4 4Go, the differences I saw:

(...)

Oh ! I don't have a RPi so i read and learn. But in another life long ago, i used to play PS1 games in EPSX on a pentium 4 @ 2,6Ghz and a GForce 5200.

And your computer hardware costed less than 100 dollars?
yes the RPI4B audio DAC is not amazing but it does the job
audio is quieter than my desktop (both at 100% vol)
if you increase the volume you begin to hear popping
you'll need amp boosted speakers instead of relying on the DAC to amp


i use my RPI4B 4GB to host servers for games
a backup solution to watch twitch with MPV
basically an idle low powered backup desktop
i also use it as a wifi router for my tablet

i can SSH VNC into the Rpi or switch HDMI (button)
wireless kb/mouse
audio mixer to handle multiple sources
also a BEEFY HDT heatpipe with Noctura Fan to keep things under 35C full load

granted i only use the SDcard, its slow but not painful.


Last edited by catbox_fugue on 30 May 2020 at 5:44 pm UTC
Dedale 30 May
legluondunet
Dedale
legluondunetI have a raspberry pi 3b+ 2Go and a raspberry pi 4 4Go, the differences I saw:

(...)

Oh ! I don't have a RPi so i read and learn. But in another life long ago, i used to play PS1 games in EPSX on a pentium 4 @ 2,6Ghz and a GForce 5200.

And your computer hardware costed less than 100 dollars?

Nope. But i am surprised to hear a modern quad-core ARM CPU struggles to do what a X86 CPU could do 15 years ago. I had no idea.

I was also surprised by remarks about the needed memory since i use an old netbook with 512 Mo of RAM from time to time.

Edit: and looking back in my old memory a friend of mine used EPSX and a N64 emulator on an Pentium III. So there is something i do not get.


Last edited by Dedale on 30 May 2020 at 6:18 pm UTC
mirv 7 years 30 May
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Dedale
legluondunet
Dedale
legluondunetI have a raspberry pi 3b+ 2Go and a raspberry pi 4 4Go, the differences I saw:

(...)

Oh ! I don't have a RPi so i read and learn. But in another life long ago, i used to play PS1 games in EPSX on a pentium 4 @ 2,6Ghz and a GForce 5200.

And your computer hardware costed less than 100 dollars?

Nope. But i am surprised to hear a modern quad-core ARM CPU struggles to do what a X86 CPU could do 15 years ago. I had no idea.

I was also surprised by remarks about the needed memory since i use an old netbook with 512 Mo of RAM from time to time.

Edit: and looking back in my old memory a friend of mine used EPSX and a N64 emulator on an Pentium III. So there is something i do not get.

x86 performance has been far superior to ARM (as it was then known) for a long time, but the cost of that is increase die space, and increase power usage. That modern quad-core arm (as it's now known) is using far superior manufacturing capabilities, I would guess superior graphics capabilities, a fraction of the wall socket power of x86, and who knows what missing instructions to help PS1 emulation, all for a greatly reduced cost.

If arm want to take on the server space, they need simple and highly parallel tasks - there's just no way they can (currently, or even for a long while) compete on number-crunching speed against x86. Price and low power? That they can compete on.
Dedale
legluondunetI have a raspberry pi 3b+ 2Go and a raspberry pi 4 4Go, the differences I saw:

(...)

Oh ! I don't have a RPi so i read and learn. But in another life long ago, i used to play PS1 games in EPSX on a pentium 4 @ 2,6Ghz and a GForce 5200.

I can only assume Leguondenet's experiences are not the norm, as PS1 emulation has been pretty solid even on the very weak Raspberry Pi 2, which was released 5 years ago. The Pi 4 is many times more powerful, so I would hope by now it's more powerful than a Pentium 4, while requiring a fraction of the electricity.
Dragunov 31 May
legluondunet
DragunovI was just a little disappointed with the Raspberry Pi 4 missing USB Boot support and the USB-C power supply issue.
I won't be buying another RPI until USB Boot is working from the factory.


Raspberry Foundation provides for some days a beta firmware for Pi 4 that enables RPi4 to boot directly from an USB drive:
https://www.tomshardware.com/how-to/boot-raspberry-pi-4-usb

When I say from the factory, I mean a Raspberry Pi with Firmware from the Factory that allows USB boot. On the Raspberry PI 3 B+ it just worked out of the box, without messing with the firmware.
IncandescentI can only assume Leguondenet's experiences are not the norm, as PS1 emulation has been pretty solid even on the very weak Raspberry Pi 2, which was released 5 years ago. The Pi 4 is many times more powerful, so I would hope by now it's more powerful than a Pentium 4, while requiring a fraction of the electricity.

I didn't nuanced enough my last comment:
for a PS1 you can use a RPi3 (and even 2 after watching your youtube video). But if you want play PS1 with good speed and graphic quality prefer a Rpi4.
For N64, you can play just some games that don't need a lot of power but in fact don't hope to play N64 games in good conditions on a Rpi3.

Emulators version that worked on a pentium III was compatible with far less games and did not displaying games on a HD screen, was not compatible with all gamepads, with some freeze or not enough speed...I don't call that a good playing experience.


Last edited by legluondunet on 1 June 2020 at 1:34 am UTC
Dunc 31 May
legluondunet- 4 Go is necessary if you wish to use a Linux distribution with a graphic environment. With 2Go, you can launch one ou two Windows maximum and the desktop experience is not very fast.
Can't say I've noticed that. I've been running a desktop on a basic Pi4 for about six weeks without issues. Mind you, I don't tend to have many things open at once. But Chromium and Firefox aren't exactly known for being light on memory, and I can run them simultaneously (with only one tab open in each, to be fair; I haven't tried any more).
drlamb 31 May
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DragunovI hope they make a Raspberry Pi 4 B+ with a 1.8ghz+ clock speed, 8gb Ram, USB Boot from the Factory, and get Hardware Acceleration 100% working. Then it will be a really great desktop PC.

Speaking from experience the RPI 4s can overclock to 2.0Ghz rather easily (provided you have the cooling capacity) though that does require editing a configuration file. I imagine once the USB boot firmware comes out of beta it'll be installed from the factory.



I use my RPI4 4GB as the ARM worker node in my mixed-architecture kubernetes cluster but would've gotten the 8GB model if it was available at launch.

  • AMD Epyc 7252 (8C16T) + 64GB DDR4 (tainted master)
  • AMD Ryzen Embedded R1505G (2C4T) + 16GB DDR4 - Snagged this DFI board for $100 on eBay (Retails for 300+)
  • RPI4 (4C) 4GB


The only node without an SSD is the PI as I'm waiting for a cheaper NVMe Hat solution and/or the USB-boot firmware to mature.


Last edited by drlamb on 31 May 2020 at 11:03 pm UTC
WJMazepas 1 Jun
Mar2ckFinally! We've been bottlenecked by a 32-bit os for too long. I just hope theyre making good progress on that vulkan driver.


They mentioned in a commentary while launching the Pi4 8GB that the progress is going well and that we should hear more news in the upcoming months
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