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Supraland stops supporting Linux shortly after leaving GOG entirely

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Supraland, a highly rated open-world puzzle adventure, has now removed mentions of Linux on Steam as the developer is unable to actually support it.

This comes shortly after the developer asked for Supraland to be completely removed from GOG, after being there less than a year citing lower sales. If you read that previous linked article, this news likely won't come as much of a surprise. Checking on SteamDB, it seems they removed the note of Linux support earlier in June. Looking around, the developer mentioned this in the official Discord, "I stopped direct linux support. Using the windows version with proton gives much better results like a much higher framerate.".

This quite likely means Supraland 2 that was funded on Kickstarter, which mentioned Linux as a planned supported platform, won't support Linux either if this is how the developer plans to go forwards.

We've seen how the developer has repeatedly mentioned before that they actually "know nothing about linux". A shame but if you're going to sell your game on a platform, that you don't test it on and don't support in any way, what's the point? It's not good for anyone.


A repeating problem too, the weird expectation that clicking to export in a game engine is enough to sell the game without testing or supporting it, which needs to stop. No one would do the same for Windows or Consoles but as usual, it comes down to the low market share cycle of doom. Developers don't support Linux directly with the lower market share, so less people use Linux and repeat. We're at least seeing a clear upwards trend right now, so perhaps one day we can see more direct support when the user share is big enough.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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Linuxwarper 27 Jun
Quoting: Whitewolfe80Thing for me its too late yes our marketshare has increased but almost every single video/article that says nows the time to try linux has one draw back proton its all they talk about and lutris I use both so i am part of the problem. That problem is of course proton has become the clutch we all rely on for games on linux. We have collectively given up on native gaming with the exception of indie games and the one to three games we get from feral a year. We have already seen developers say use the proton version if you want a linux version that attitude has quickly become the norm.
Few if anyone has given up on native gaming. It's simply factual that many major games will never be ported to Linux. To play them, we use Proton. And by the time they do come to Linux people will have either moved on or the wait has been so long that you could buy the Windows version of the game far cheaper than the Linux native one.

No matter how much you ask devs for native ports they simply will not come. If they do come by any chance the possibility of it being poorly handled isn't low. To point that as OS is updated the game runs into issues running or it has poor performance.

Developers telling us to rely on Proton for their games proves little about current state of native games. For all you know these devs had in mind a hacky release of their game for Linux. So poorly developed for Linux that Proton preceeds it with ease in performance. What is the point of native games for Linux if these native releases are poorly handled or of poor quality?


Last edited by Linuxwarper on 27 June 2020 at 11:33 pm UTC
Quoting: Whitewolfe80That problem is of course proton has become the clutch we all rely on for games on linux.
Speak for yourself. I've never used it. Not because I'm virtuous, mind you, just because most games I ever play are from Paradox and the rest are ones I read about here.
slaapliedje 28 Jun
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Quoting: mirv
Quoting: omer666It's more of a monopoly problem than a low market share problem. Back in the days, porting a game on 4/5 different OS was the norm.
Today all computers run on x86 architecture, all you need for testing your game on Linux is to install the damn distro.

Ignoring the main topic a little, "back in the day" games were also far less complicated to write. Game engines could likely be maintained and ported by a single person, or very small teams. It's far more complex these days.

...not to say that I don't think you're right. I do think you're right. They could just install GNU/Linux (and by now it's fairly easy to find the most popular) to do at least basic testing for a version they're asking people to pay money for.
I actually think the opposite is true. These days we have IDEs, we have prebuilt game engines and the 'click here to port to other platforms' option. I believe this one uses the Unreal Engine and that is how he 'supported' Linux in the first place, is clicked that button.

I mess around with a lot of retro systems. One would think porting from the Atari 8bit computers to the 5200 game console (and the other way) would be easy! They are basically the exact same hardware. Main differences is the memory banking, and the control mechanisms. But there are more subtle things you have to do, like memory mapping (and remembering where BASIC is on the 8bit computer line, etc.)

While it is true, if you're going to write a new game from scratch, the complexities you can put into it can be far greater than what used to be the case, the better development tools, the prebuilt engines, and hell even artwork packs you can buy for making your game. It's kind of sort of come full circle, from the single digit team of coders working in basements and releasing games on a floppy disk in a ziplock bag, to now you can have a single digit team working out of basements with things like RPG Maker, or Unreal, or Unity and using game art packs, etc. I've thought for a while that I should dabble with RPG Maker, but I have too many other things I'm working on...

This still is no excuse for developers to be like 'hey we think we got all the money we're gonna get from Linux customers, so let's just yank support so we don't have to actually support it...' Guess I won't be buying Supraland 2
saturnoyo 28 Jun
Quoting: mylkacan we talk about "support" here? he just press the "compile for linux" button and hopes for the best!
i wouldnt call that "support", so he cant stop supporting it, if he never supported it

Yep, we have lost nothing. It amazes me how unprofessional some people are.

How can you sell something that you haven't even tested? How can you say that you support a platform when you don't even look at it?

And then they go and blame Linux for all the amount of bugs that the game has in it. I wonder how many bugs they fixed in windows. Hundreds or thousands I guess, it's the normal process of creating a game. But for some reason they think Linux will just work with no extra work.

For some time I was interested in this game, it (still) looks great. But I investigated more about it before buying and I lost all my interest. Some people don't deserve my money and I don't deserve their games.

It's a pity. At least the developer is not hiding what they do. I would be extremely ashamed if I were so bad at my job.
Quoting: Linuxwarper
Quoting: Whitewolfe80Thing for me its too late yes our marketshare has increased but almost every single video/article that says nows the time to try linux has one draw back proton its all they talk about and lutris I use both so i am part of the problem. That problem is of course proton has become the clutch we all rely on for games on linux. We have collectively given up on native gaming with the exception of indie games and the one to three games we get from feral a year. We have already seen developers say use the proton version if you want a linux version that attitude has quickly become the norm.
Few if anyone has given up on native gaming. It's simply factual that many major games will never be ported to Linux. To play them, we use Proton. And by the time they do come to Linux people will have either moved on or the wait has been so long that you could buy the Windows version of the game far cheaper than the Linux native one.

No matter how much you ask devs for native ports they simply will not come. If they do come by any chance the possibility of it being poorly handled isn't low. To point that as OS is updated the game runs into issues running or it has poor performance.

Developers telling us to rely on Proton for their games proves little about current state of native games. For all you know these devs had in mind a hacky release of their game for Linux. So poorly developed for Linux that Proton preceeds it with ease in performance. What is the point of native games for Linux if these native releases are poorly handled or of poor quality?

I am sorry i disagree completely really how many linux gamers have bought Red dead 2 how many are going to by cyberpunk neither of which is ever coming to linux because the majority of linux gamers will buy them and play them on proton. Which means why the fuck would a small publisher waste the cash doing a linux port when they have seen their peers profit from no effort from linux gamers.
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: Whitewolfe80That problem is of course proton has become the clutch we all rely on for games on linux.
Speak for yourself. I've never used it. Not because I'm virtuous, mind you, just because most games I ever play are from Paradox and the rest are ones I read about here.

Good for you but you are in the minority
const 28 Jun
Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: constWe even celebrate those that ignore us but implement a Vulkan renderer.

Would you prefer that individual game devs became more tightly dependent on DirectX rather than developing their cross-platform skillset?

No, Vulkan renderers are awesome. My post was entirely around the fact that a big part of this community accepts developers that don't care about linux a lot more then those who at least give it a try but fail (for whatever reasons and not just this kind of extreme case). From the perspective of the developer, this raises the risk of entry enormously.
Microsoft doesn't need to bribe studios to stay away from linux. Members of this community do that job for free.
And it used to be very different.


Last edited by const on 28 June 2020 at 7:25 am UTC
Alm888 28 Jun
Quoting: constMy post was entirely around the fact that a big part of this community accepts developers that don't care about linux a lot more then those who at least give it a try but fail (for whatever reasons and not just this kind of extreme case). From the perspective of the developer, this raises the risk of entry enormously.
Bashing the failed attempts would be inexcusable if there was no money involved. But we do not speak just "Oops, we failed, sorry!" cases. In most cases there were Kickstarter campaigns, pre-orders and even actual full-fledged purchases before the "Oops" part. So, we are dealing with broken promises, second-class treatment and scammers -- nasty stuff!

Those who did not promise anything from the get-go are totally fine: some will "Just Use Proton™" (knowing well what they are doing and that there is no and will not be any support and they can just say their money "Good Bye!"), others will just walk away without any hard feelings.

TL;DR I'd rather not bash the community for "toxicity" towards failed Linux ports, most of the time the hatred is justified.
tuubi 28 Jun
Quoting: const
Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: constWe even celebrate those that ignore us but implement a Vulkan renderer.

Would you prefer that individual game devs became more tightly dependent on DirectX rather than developing their cross-platform skillset?

No, Vulkan renderers are awesome. My post was entirely around the fact that a big part of this community accepts developers that don't care about linux a lot more then those who at least give it a try but fail (for whatever reasons and not just this kind of extreme case). From the perspective of the developer, this raises the risk of entry enormously.
Clicking a button and releasing on a platform without testing? Sure. That does sound very risky. People might not like the result. Actually trying and failing does not usually result in a crappy release (or a release at all), but not bothering to do the bare minimum sometimes does.

Quoting: constMicrosoft doesn't need to bribe studios to stay away from linux. Members of this community do that job for free.
Why would a monopoly holder need to bribe anyone? And that jab at the community is just insincere. In my experience this gaming community is a damn sight more welcoming and helpful than most gaming communities.

I don't think we should avoid being critical of developers who have no intention of supporting our platform properly. Windows gamers sure don't shy away from crapping on bad console ports, and those are actually tested and supported on Windows.

Quoting: constAnd it used to be very different.
You mean back when none of us even considered calling ourselves Linux gamers because there were just a handful of commercial games available? And when nobody actually put out crappy releases by pressing an "Export to Linux" button and calling it a day, because buttons like that did not exist?

Do you remember a different past where we were so desperate for games that we threw our cash at whatever scraps were thrown our way? Because I was here, and I don't remember ever being that desperate.
const 28 Jun
I consinder myself a linux gamer since 2001. Before Steam for Linux, about every game developer using Unity was regularly asked to hit that button and let the community handle the rest. :D
And yes, this is an extreme case, but my argument was not related to this event alone.
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